James B. Turner

Papers, 1859-1876

SC12613

Quantity: 1 box (0.25 cubic ft.)
Access: Open to research
Acquisition: Purchased, Whitlock (vendor), January 1953
Processed By: Nicholas Webb, Student Assistant, State University of New York at Albany, October 2008

Printable Version (PDF, 78 KB)pdf icon

View catalog record

Biographical Note:

James B. Turner served in the “Irish Brigade,” a New York-based volunteer brigade consisting largely of Irish immigrants, during the American Civil War. Educated and widely read, Turner was a lawyer in civilian life. His dispatches from the front, including detailed accounts of several major battles, were published in the New York City-based Irish-American newspaper under the pen names “Jersey Blue” and “Gallowglass.”

Turner was born in Ireland and emigrated to the United States with his family as a young man. The family settled in Jersey City, New Jersey, and in 1859 Turner became an American citizen. After the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter in April 1861, Turner enlisted for military service in the 2nd Regiment of the Hudson Brigade, a ninety-day volunteer regiment. In late April he joined his regiment at Camp Olden in Trenton; in May the regiment moved to Camp Scott near Washington, D.C., and in June they moved to Camp Princeton in Arlington, Virginia. During the First Battle of Bull Run the regiment remained in reserve in Alexandria, where they guarded a bridge.

When his ninety-day service was over, Turner re-enlisted in the 88th New York State Volunteers, a regiment in Brigadier General Thomas Meagher’s “Irish Brigade.” In December 1861 he was appointed a first lieutenant and assigned as an aide-de-camp to General Meagher. After training for several months at Camp California in Alexandria, Virginia, the Irish Brigade took part in the Peninsular Campaign and fought in the Seven Days’ Battles. In July 1862 Turner was appointed acting Assistant Adjutant General of the Brigade, but he did not receive a permanent appointment to the position; instead, he returned to the 88th regiment, for which he was appointed adjutant.

In September 1862, during the Battle of Antietam, Turner was shot in the arm and badly injured. In February 1863 he underwent reconstructive surgery in Washington, D.C. He visited the front in March 1863 to see his friends in the Brigade and write a report for the Irish-American, and by the autumn of 1863 he was back on active duty and serving as an Inspector in the office of the Assistant Provost Marshal General. In 1864 he returned to his regiment, and in May 1864 he was killed in action during the Battle of the Wilderness.

The collection also contains material related to Turner’s commanding officer, Brigadier General Thomas Francis Meagher. Meagher was born in Ireland in 1823. During his youth he was a member of the “Young Ireland” movement against British rule and created the green-white-and-orange tricolor which is now the national flag of Ireland. Deported to Australia by the British, he escaped to the United States in 1852 and became an American citizen. During the Civil War Meagher recruited and led a brigade of Irish-American volunteers which fought for the Union in many of the war’s major battles. After the war he became Acting Governor of the Montana Territory, where he died in 1867.

Scope and Content Note:

This collection consists primarily of letters sent by James B. Turner to his family in Jersey City, N.J., during his service in the Union Army and of various other records related to Turner’s military service. It also contains a small assortment of material related to Turner’s commanding officer, Brigadier General Thomas Francis Meagher.

Although Turner’s letters to his family contain relatively few discussions of specific battles and military maneuvers, which he generally saved for his published columns in the Irish-American, they give detailed descriptions of life in camp and of the daily routines of military service. Turner’s early letters, dating from his ninety-day volunteer service prior to the defeat at Bull Run, are generally enthusiastic about the conflict and excited at the prospect of battle. His later letters, although they remain optimistic about a Union victory, are more disillusioned about the hardships and difficulties of war. In several letters, Turner gives strongly negative descriptions of military life in order to persuade his father not to enlist in the Army.

Turner’s letters also give a glimpse of the worries afflicting an Irish immigrant family in Civil War-era New York. During Turner’s military service he was the sole breadwinner for his family, and his letters offer encouragement to his unemployed father and advice to his mother on how best to spend the paychecks he sends her. (Turner’s father, Samuel J. Turner, was unemployed throughout his son’s service, although by 1865 he seems to have secured a position as a clerk in the U.S. Mustering and Disbursing Office.) His letters also display ethnic pride in the courage and skill of his brigade; of particular note is a July 1862 letter in which Turner instructs his young sister in the glories of Irish military history.

The collection includes various other papers related to Turner’s military service, including commission and discharge papers, orders, and a muster-out roll, as well as several letters to his father Samuel regarding his death on the battlefield and subsequent burial.

Finally, the collection contains two notebooks of pre-Civil War material reflecting Turner’s intellectual interests and his study of the law. Turner appears to have been a participant in a debating society, and the majority of the notebooks are taken up with essays or addresses on such questions as “Are the incentives to the Commission of Crime greater in an age of Civilization than in an age of Barbarism?” and “Is the public press conducive to morality?” They also include reflections on Turner’s reading in ancient and modern history, several short poems, and notes on contemporary legal practice. The second notebook contains a brief, emotional account (apparently torn out of the notebook after it was written but later slipped back in) of an encounter with a pair of high-class prostitutes, during which Turner struggled to resist temptation and maintain his chastity. The blank pages of the second notebook were later used as a scrapbook containing Turner’s published dispatches in the Irish-American.

Brigadier General Meagher is represented by a small assortment of correspondence and military orders, including an 1861 letter from an Irish volunteer regiment requesting that he become their commanding officer and an 1862 order instructing Meagher to visit New York City and recruit more volunteers for the Brigade.

Container List:

Box Folder Item Description
      James B. Turner – Letters to Family, 1861-1863
1 1 1 A.L.S., 27 April 1861, Headquarters, Hudson Brigade, Trenton, N.J., to “My dear Father, Mother and Sisters.” Turner has arrived in camp and is excited to be going to war.
1 1 2 A.L.S., 30 April 1861, Camp Olden, Trenton, N.J., to “My dear Father, Mother and Sisters.” Turner misses his family. His regiment has been drilling and will soon move out.
1 1 3 A.L.S., 2 May 1861, Camp Olden, Trenton, N.J., to “My dear Father, Mother, Sisters.” The regiment remains in camp, waiting for orders.
1 1 4 A.L.S., 2 May 1861, Camp Olden, Trenton, N.J. to “My dear Father, Mother, Sisters.” (This letter is missing its bottom third.) The regiment is preparing to move.
1 1 5 A.L.S., 4 May 1861, Steamboat Delaware, to “My dear Father, Mother and Sisters.” (This letter is missing its second page.) The regiment is on a steamboat en route to the Chesapeake. Turner describes the daily life of his company; some of its more musical members have acquired a banjo and a fiddle.
1 1 6 A.L.S., [May 1861?, Annapolis, Md.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner’s boat has arrived in Annapolis Harbor. He has heard that another volunteer from Jersey City was injured in an accident en route, but he does not know the details.
1 1 7 A.L.S., 11 May 1861, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner longs for more letters from his family and discusses an incident in which a mess hall table was overturned because the soldiers were unhappy with their food.
1 1 8 A.L.S., 12 May 1861, Washington, D.C., to “My dear little sissy.” A brief, affectionate note to his sister, Sarah Turner.
1 1 9 A.L.S., 12 May 1861, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Father.” Describes a false alarm in which he and other soldiers were sent to investigate “suspicious characters prowling about” the harbor.
1 1 10 A.L.S., 15 May 1861, Camp Runyon, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment has left its barracks for an encampment. Turner describes his shift on cooking duty and mentions a troop-inspection visit by “Old Abe, Seward and Secretary Chase.” Despite the impending war, life in camp is quiet.
1 1 11 A.L.S., 17 May 1861, Camp Runyon, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner discusses his work as a war correspondent for the Irish-American, where he writes under the pen name “Jersey Blue.”
1 1 12 A.L.S., 19 May 1861, Camp Runyon, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Describes life in camp and gives a long, lyrical account of watching the stars during late-night guard duty.
1 1 13 A.L.S., 20 May 1861, Camp Monmouth, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Describes the daily camp routine of drill and meals.
1 1 14 A.L.S., 23 May 1861, Camp Scott, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Describes a late-night military parade attended by a Colonel Miller, who (to Turner’s disappointment) is unable to control his horse when it gets spooked by the crowd. Mentions that the name of his camp has changed repeatedly, from Camp Runyon to Camp Monmouth to Camp Scott.
1 1 15 A.L.S., 25 May 1861, “Columbia Springs, Virginia, opposite Washington, D.C.,” to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Describes his company’s march out of Washington and into Virginia.
1 1 16 A.L.S., 28 May 1861, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner spends a day’s leave at an inn in Beltsville, Virginia, where he enjoys the good food and comfortable bed. He worries that the hospitable Southern family which runs the inn will become victims of the war.
1 1 17 A.L.S., 30 May 1861, Roaches Springs, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” On guard duty in a pleasant rural area, Turner reflects on the tragedy of a “fratricidal war” which has driven the Southerners whose land he sits on to flee their home. He describes a conversation with the former slave woman who does his washing.
1 1 18 A.L.S., 31 May 1861, Camp Scott, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Mother.” Describes overnight guard duty.
1 2 1 A.L.S., 2 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Discusses life in camp, the poor quality of the government whiskey, and the death of Colonel Ellsworth.
1 2 2 A.L.S., 3 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment is digging trenches. They are full of patriotic spirit and eagerly awaiting the order to fight.
1 2 3 A.L.S., 4 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Describes a long night during which the regiment is woken up several times and told to prepare to march.
1 2 4 A.L.S., 11 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Despite widespread rumors of upcoming orders, for now the regiment remains in camp.
1 2 5 A.L.S., 14 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment remains in camp. Mentions that General McDowell and President Lincoln have made inspections of the troops.
1 2 6 A.L.S., 20 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment remains in camp, and “the inaction is becoming irksome.” Includes a detailed description of the earthworks at Camp Princeton.
1 2 7 A.L.S., 25 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment remains in camp; one volunteer accidentally shot another in the leg while cleaning a revolver.
1 2 8 A.L.S., 26 June 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Mother.” The regiment remains in camp; life in camp is “monotonous, and were it not for the tremendous interests of the country which are at stake one would soon tire of it.” The presence of a large military encampment has severely inflated food prices in the surrounding countryside.
1 3 1 A.L.S., 6 July 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment remains in camp; Turner spent Independence Day in Washington, D.C., observing the opening of Congress in his capacity as a journalist.
1 3 2 A.L.S., 13 July 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment remains in camp. Turner’s ninety-day volunteer service will end soon and he will be mustered out; he looks forward to seeing his family again.
1 3 3 A.L.S., 16 July 1861, Camp Princeton, [Arlington, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The regiment is preparing to march to Alexandria, Va.
1 3 4 A.L.S., 23 July 1861, Alexandria, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner reassures his family that he was not hurt at Bull Run; his regiment remained in reserve at Alexandria, where they guarded a bridge.
1 3 5 A.L.S., [26?] December 1861, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Mother and Sisters.” Turner is in Washington; if the family needs money, they can pick up his correspondent’s pay at the offices of the Irish-American.
1 3 6 A.L.S., 27 December 1861, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Mother and Sisters.” Turner has been appointed a first lieutenant in Colonel Baker’s regiment and assigned as an aide-de-camp to Brigadier General Thomas Meagher. Because of the ongoing reorganization of the Army, he is having trouble receiving the back pay due him.
1 4 1 A.L.S., 2 January 1862, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner has no news to report and still has not received his back pay. He recommends that his father visit the newpapermen Cole and Meehan with his letter of recommendation to ask about finding a job.
1 4 2 A.L.S., 10 January 1862, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Life in camp remains quiet. Turner’s regiment will be on picket duty.
1 4 3 A.L.S., 17 February 1862, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Despite fierce competition from other candidates, Turner has been confirmed as aide-de-camp to General Meagher.
1 4 4 A.L.S., 4 March 1862, Headquarters, Irish Brigade, Sumner’s Division, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner has no news to report that is not in his published letters. The weather in Virginia is inconstant and disagreeable.
1 4 5 A.L.S., 23 March 1862, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Describes a late-night journey through the forest from Manassas back to camp.
1 4 6 A.L.S., [?] March 1862, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Describes Turner’s surroundings, uniform and daily routine as a member of the general’s staff.
1 4 7 A.L.S., 28 March 1862, Warrenton Station, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The brigade has been marching through Virginia, where the civilians are “blanched with fear” at the sight of Union troops.
1 5 1 A.L.S., 3 April 1862, Camp California, [Alexandria, Va.], to “My dear Mother.” A brief note. Turner is in “a dreadful hurry” and preparing to board a ship for Fort Monroe.
1 5 2 A.L.S., 9 April 1862, “Steamer Columbia, lying near Fortress Monroe, Va.,” to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner is en route to Fort Monroe. He still has not received his back pay, but he recently purchased a “fine mare” from a lieutenant colonel in another regiment.
1 5 3 A.L.S., 18 April 1862, Headquarters, Irish Brigade, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Despite bad weather, the brigade has left Fort Monroe and is approaching the front.
1 5 4 A.L.S., 23 April 1862, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The Brigade remains in reserve at Camp Scott.
1 5 5 A.L.S., 26 April 1862, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” In camp. The weather is bad, but the Brigade has received new tents; Turner gives a detailed description of the tent he shares with “McCoy, the Assistant Adjutant General.”
1 5 6 A.L.S., 1 May 1862, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner has recently recovered from an illness. He has finally received the first installment of his back pay, of which he encloses a portion for his family.
1 5 7 A.L.S., 2 May 1862, Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner advises his parents on how best to spend the money he recently sent them; despite the hard times, he says, they are lucky to have at least one family member working.
1 5 8 A.L.S., 9 May 1862, no location given, to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The Brigade is within six miles of Richmond. There was a recent battle [Williamsburg?]. Turner is safe, but he tells the story of how he was almost hit by a falling shell. His mare, “Katie Darling,” won a recent steeplechase, and his success in defending Colonel Baker at a recent court-martial has led to requests from other regiments for his service as counsel.
1 5 9 A.L.S., 11 May 1862, Yorktown, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” A brief note informing his family that he is well. He is preparing to board a steamboat up the York River to West Point, Va.
1 5 10 A.L.S., 21 May 1862, “camp 13 miles from Richmond,” to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The army is marching to Richmond, and Turner is hopeful: “The more I see of the execution of McClellan’s plans, the more I like him and appreciate his talents, which at one time I doubted the existence of.” He has recently been sick with a fever, which the staff doctor thinks was caused in part by homesickness; Turner longs to see his family again and is hoping to get sick leave soon.
1 6 1 A.L.S., 14 June 1862, “camp near Fair Oaks, Va.,” to “My dear Parents.” Turner begins his letter with “not a word of news” to write, but as he sits writing he hears “the rebel drums beat their tattoo” in the distance. Other than “the little troubles that are always incident to camp,” however, he is in good spirits.
1 6 2 A.L.S., 25 June 1862, Headquarters, Irish Brigade, “camp near Fair Oaks, Va.,” to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Briefly describes a “little affair, principally with artillery” on the previous day, during which a friend of Turner’s, a lieutenant in the 7th New Jersey Regiment, was killed by friendly fire.
1 6 3 A.L.S., 16 July 1862, “Head Quarters, Meagher Brigade, Harrison’s Landing, Va.,” to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner has been promoted to acting Assistant Adjutant General of the Brigade. He will be sending a large sum of money home soon. He tells his family that he will have many stories to tell of the Seven Days’ Battles and shares one of them: during the Battle of Malvern Hill, a falling bullet put a hole in the brim of his straw hat as he was giving orders to the troops.
1 6 4 A.L.S., 19 July 1862, “Head Quarters, Meagher’s Brigade, Harrison’s Landing, Va.” to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner remains in camp while General Meagher travels to New York to recruit more soldiers; while there, the General will inquire about permanently promoting Turner to Assistant Adjutant General. Turner strongly dissuades his unemployed father from joining the military: it would be “utterly foolish” decision, for “the associations of the commissioned officers, to say nothing of the rank and file, are not the most agreeable or comfortable. Take my advice and put everything like that out of your head.”
1 6 5 A.L.S., 26 July 1862, “Head Quarters, Irish Brigade, Harrison’s Landing, James River, Va.,” to “My dear little Sister Sarah.” A reply to his sister, who has sent him a letter. Turner describes his quarters in camp and explains that his sister should be proud to hear of the Irish Brigade’s bravery during the Seven Days’ Battles: “When you begin to study History you will read how the Irish have been fighting all over the world, and how valiant and brave they have always been; and therefore you and I and all of us are glad that they are just as courageous and noble now as hundreds of years ago when our people fought in France and Spain.”
1 6 6 A.L.S., 26 July 1862, Harrison’s Landing, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” The brigade remains in camp, performing “the usual routine duties of military life.” Turner is glad to hear that his father met General Meagher in person at the offices of the Irish-American.
1 6 7 A.L.S., 29 July 1862, “Head Quarters, Meagher’s Brigade, Harrison’s Landing, Va.,” to “My dear Father.” A note to his father; Turner is concerned that he has not yet heard whether the family has received the money he sent them. Once again, he discourages his father in the strongest possible terms from joining the military.
1 6 8 A.L.S., 2 August 1862, “Head Quarters, Irish Brigade, Harrison’s Landing, Va., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner remains very concerned about the money he sent his parents; meanwhile, the rebels have set up artillery across the river and may soon start shelling the camp.
1 6 9 A.L.S., 9 August 1862, “On picket near Rockville, Maryland,” to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” After spending time on leave with his family, Turner has rejoined the Brigade only to find that he has been replaced as Assistant Adjutant General by “a young, inexperienced gentleman, not at all connected with the brigade.” He has returned to his old regiment, under the command of a Lieutenant Colonel Kelly, where he has been appointed adjutant.
1 6 10 A.L.S., 11 August 1862, “Head Quarters, Irish Brigade, On Picket near Malvern Hill,” to “My dear Mother, Father and Sisters.” Turner hopes the money he is earning will allow his family to set themselves up in a house or cottage. He describes the high prices and low quality of goods in camp – he bought a blue shirt from a sutler, but its colors began to run as soon as he started sweating.
1 7 1 A.L.S., 6 February 1863, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner is in Washington with an injured arm. Dr. Clymer, an eminent surgeon, will be operating on it later in the week.
1 7 2 A.L.S., 8 February 1863, Ebbitt House, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Dr. Clymer has postponed the operation, and Turner has rented a room in a private house. He has received his commission as assistant adjutant general and has been offered the position of lieutenant colonel by Colonel Kelly of the 88th Regiment.
1 7 3 A.L.S., 18 February 1863, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” A brief letter. Turner is in bed recovering from his surgery.
1 7 4 A.L.S., 21 February 1863, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner’s arm has been put in a splint and he is able to stand up for brief periods, but he is still confined to bed and spends most of the day reading.
1 7 5 A.L.S., 28 February 1863, 417 G Street, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Three weeks after the operation, Turner is still confined to his bedroom.
1 7 6 A.L.S., 10 March 1863, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner encloses money; he remains in recovery.
1 7 7 A.L.S., 13 March 1863, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner has received permission from Dr. Clymer to return temporarily to the front for a visit with his friends, although his arm is still in a sling and he will not be on duty.
1 7 8 A.L.S., [8?] April 1863, Washington, D.C., to “My dear Parents and Sisters.” Turner has returned from the front to Washington. He hopes he can obtain a leave of absence from Dr. Clymer so he can visit his family.
      James B. Turner – Papers and Non-Family Correspondence, 1859-1864
1 8   A.L.S., 24 April 1863, M.F. [Lewis?], Brooklyn, N.Y., to Governor Horatio Seymour. Letter recommending promotion of James B. Turner to lieutenant colonel.
1 9   A.L.S., 21 October 1863, James B. Turner, New York, to Brigadier General L. Thomas. Turner reports that he is on duty, serving as an inspector in the office of Colonel Nugent, the Acting Assistant Provost Marshal General.
1 10   Certificate of Naturalization, 5 October 1859 (1 item)
1 11 1 Discharge Certificate, 2nd Regiment, New Jersey State Militia, 31 July 1861. Signed by Col. Henry M. Baker.
1 11 2 Commission, First Lieutenant, 88th Regiment, New York State Volunteers, 2 January 1862. Signed by Assistant Adjutant-General Campbell and Governor E.D. Morgan.
1 11 3 Commission, Adjutant, 88th Regiment, New York State Volunteers, 8 August 1862. Signed by Adjutant-General [signature illegible] and Governor E.D. Morgan.
1 12   Muster-Out Roll, 7 March 1863 (1 item)
1 13   Orders, 1862-1864 (4 items)
      Samuel J. Turner – Correspondence re: Death of James B. Turner. Papers and Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1864-1876
1 14 1 A.L.S., undated [May 1864], C.S. Langdon to Samuel J. Turner. Brief note informing S.J. Turner that his son was killed in action on May 5.
1 14 2 A.L.S., 6 June 1864, C.S. Langdon, near Cold Harbor, Va., to Samuel J. Turner. Letter regarding the burial of James Turner’s body (the gravesite is now behind enemy lines) and the disposition of his effects.
1 14 3 A.L.S., 22 June 1864, C.S. Langdon, City Point, Va., to Samuel J. Turner. James Turner’s effects will be sent to New York with a wounded officer returning from the front.
1 14 4 A.L.S. 29 July 1864, C.S. Langdon, “bivouac on the banks of the James River, Va.,” to Samuel J. Turner. Letter regarding the location of Turner’s gravesite and the loss of his overcoat, which was lent to a fellow officer and later taken by the enemy.
1 14 5 A.L.S., 28 August 1865, [Thomas?] Smyth, Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, to Samuel J. Turner. Describes the death of James Turner and offers condolences.
1 15   Correspondence – E. Wood to “Mr. Turner” [Samuel J. Turner], 1876 (2 items)
1 16   Samuel J. Turner – Papers [U.S. Mustering & Disbursing Office?], 1865-1866 (6 items)
      Thomas Francis Meagher – Papers, 1861-1863 (9 items)
1 17 1 Engraved portrait of T.F. Meagher, undated. Caption: “Photograph by Brady, engraved by J.C. Buttre.”
1 17 2 A.L.S., 31 July 1861, Lt. Col. F.D. Kelly to Capt. T.F. Meagher. Letter from the officers of the 3rd Irish Volunteers requesting that Meagher take command of their regiment. Includes transcript.
1 17 3 Special Order No. 205, 16 July 1862. An order from General McClellan, signed by Assistant Adjutant General S. Williams, instructing Meagher to go to New York and recruit volunteers for the Irish Brigade.
1 17 4 Application for leave of absence of Quartermaster P.M. Haverty, 88th Regiment N.Y.S.V. Approved with signature by Lt. Col. P. Kelly and Brig. Gen. T.F. Meagher; denied by Major General Richardson with signature by Assistant Adjutant General John McDowell.
1 17 5 General Order No. 9, 9 Nov 1862. Certified copy with signature of Brig. Gen. T.F. Meagher. Meagher orders his regimental commanders to prepare a parade of the troops for General McClellan. Includes transcript.
1 17 6 A.L.S., 18 December 1862, Samuel L.M. Barlow, New York, N.Y. to Brig. Gen. T.F. Meagher. A friend from New York writes to Meagher to find out whether he was injured at Fredericksburg and to inform him that the now dismissed General McClellan often praises the courage of the Irish Brigade. Includes transcript.
1 17 7 A.L.S., 20 December 1862, [signature illegible], Washington, D.C., to Brig. Gen. T.F. Meagher. Response to an invitation to view the presentation of new colors to the brigade.
1 17 8 A.L.S., 29 March 1863, Col. George W. von Schack, Headquarters, 7th Regiment N.Y.S.V., camp near Falmouth, Va., to Brig. Gen. T.F. Meagher. Thanks Meagher for his compliments and wishes him well.
1 17 9 A.L.S., 10-11 August 1863, T.F. Meagher, Southfields, Orange County, N.Y., to James B. Turner. Meagher advises Turner on writing a history of the Irish Brigade.
      Notebooks, [late 1850s]-1863
1 18   James B. Turner – Notebook, [late 1850s.]
Contains essays and addresses, poetry, and notes on the law.
1 19   James B. Turner – Notebook and scrapbook, 1860-1863.
Contains essays and addresses, poetry, and a diary entry describing an encounter with a prostitute. Blank pages used as scrapbook of Turner’s columns in the Irish-American, 1861-1863.
Last Updated: January 19, 2010