Irving G. Vann
Papers, 1863-1918; bulk, 1895-1913

SC11393

Quantity: 3 boxes (ca. 2.0 cubic ft.)
Access: Open to research
Acquisition: Gift from Albert Vann Fowler in November 1944
Processed By: Abigail L. Fahrenwald Simkovic, Student Assistant, University at Albany, April 2013.

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Related Exhibit: Governor Sulzer Impeached

Biographical Note:

Irving Goodwin Vann (1842-1921) was born on his parents' farm at Willow Creek in the town of Ulysses, Tompkins County, New York, on January 3, 1842. He was the only child of Samuel R. Vann and Catherine H. Goodwin Vann. His great-grandfather on his father's side, Samuel Vann, had been a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War. His grandfather on his mother's side, Joseph Goodwin, fought in the War of 1812.

Vann received no formal education until he attended the Trumansburg Academy in preparation for college. He also spent a year of study at Ithaca Academy, which enabled him to enroll at Yale College in 1859. After struggling his first year to catch up with his more formally-schooled classmates, Vann graduated with his class in 1863. During his time at Yale Vann was an active member of the then literary society, now famous fraternity, Delta Kappa Epsilon.

Initially pursuing a career in education, Vann became a high school principal and teacher in Owensboro, Kentucky. Although his employers urged him to continue in that field, he resigned after a year and began to study law at the office of Boardman & Finch in Ithaca, New York. In the fall of 1864, he entered Albany Law School, graduating in the spring of 1865. Although he never returned to a full-time teaching career, the cause of public education was one he championed throughout his time as both mayor and judge. Later in life Vann lectured at the Syracuse, Albany, and Cornell law schools.

Upon his graduation from Albany Law School, Vann accepted a position at the Department of Treasury in Washington, D.C. In less than a year, however, he returned home to central New York, joining the law firm of Raynor & Butler in Syracuse. Thus began an illustrious career in private practice in a succession of law firms bearing his name: Vann & Fiske, Raynor & Vann, Fuller & Vann, and Vann, McLennan & Dillaye. Irving Vann became an accomplished appellate lawyer.

Vann married Julie Florence Dillaye (1846-1934), the daughter of a prominent Syracuse real estate developer, on October 11, 1870. The couple had two children: Florence (1871-1942) and Irving Dillaye (1875-1944). Vann was an active member of the Syracuse legal community, was one of the founders of the New York State Bar Association, and served as an early president of the Onondaga Bar Association. He also served as president of a number of civic and philanthropic organizations, including the Woodlawn Cemetery Board and the Onondaga Red Cross Society, and was a member of many others, including the New York State Historical Society and the Albany Historical Society. He founded the Onondaga Country Club and was its first president in 1898, and was active in a number of social organizations, including the Century Club, the Fort Orange Club, and the University Club. Though a member of the liberal wing of the Republican Party, Vann remained popular with all partisan party members while participating extensively in local political affairs.

Vann's return to work in the private sector after the completion of a one-year term in 1880 as mayor of Syracuse was short-lived. In 1881 his party nominated him to run for Justice of the Supreme Court in the Fifth Judicial District. He won by a margin of over 11,000 votes. Justice Vann served on the Supreme Court trial bench until 1889 when he began the first of his two associations with the Court of Appeals. When a Second Division of the Court of Appeals was created in 1889 to address the court's overwhelming case load, Vann was one of seven Supreme Court justices from throughout the state who were appointed to decide appeals sitting as a separate body from the original court. Justice Vann served on the Second Division until it was dissolved in 1892 at which time he returned to the trial bench. At the conclusion of his first term on the Supreme Court in 1895, Justice Vann was endorsed by both parties to run for re-election.

In 1896 Governor Levi P. Morton appointed Vann to the Court of Appeals, filling the vacancy created when Judge Rufus W. Peckham, Jr., was elevated to the United States Supreme Court. Since a Court of Appeals judgeship was then an elected position, Vann soon found himself running in a statewide election. He again proved his strength as a candidate, winning by a majority of 243,180, which at that time was the largest majority ever achieved by a state officer in a contested election.

Upon the completion of his 14-year term, Vann was nominated by both parties and succeeded at being re-elected to a second term in the fall of 1910. He served on the Court of Appeals until January 1, 1913, when he reached the mandatory retirement age of 70. Following his retirement, he continued to serve the people of New York State as the official referee appointed to hear claims arising out of the construction of the barge canal.

During his tenure on the Court of Appeals, Irving G. Vann authored a number of significant opinions. Perhaps the most well known is In Re Totten (179 NY 112 [1904]), in which the Court articulated the common law rules applicable to what has come to be known as a "Totten Trust." This cogent statement remains black-letter law, Irving G. Vann's opinion having been cited by the Court of Appeals as recently as 2003 (see Eredics v. Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A., 100 NY2d 106, 110 [2003]). Equally significant was his decision in Tabor v. Hoffman (118 NY 30 [1889]), where Vann articulated fundamental principles that have since governed trade secret law, i.e., distinguishing between the free imitation of a competitor's product and the stealing of product secrets through bribery or other wrongdoing. But the opinion that best displays Irving G. Vann's personality and literary skill is Smith v. United States Casualty Co. (197 NY 420 [1910]) in which the court held that, under the common law, a person has the right to change his or her name at will as long as the alteration is done in good faith and for an honest purpose. In this opinion Vann cited historical instances of figures changing their names from Roman politicians to Romantic poets.

Vann had an extensive knowledge of history, art, and literature that was displayed in many of his sentencing speeches. His home library contained more than 10,000 volumes, many of which were rare.

Vann spent much of his leisure time outdoors, collected antique firearms and was known as an avid sportsman until advancing years and ill health limited his activity. That he had lost none of his literary deftness was evident when, in 1913, he addressed the University Club in Albany. In a speech entitled "Yale Fifty Years Ago," the manuscript of which is in this collection, Vann described life as a student in New Haven from 1859 to 1863. He gave the talk at the end of 1912 on the last day of his life on the court "before becoming disqualified by constitutional softening of the brain," he said.

In 1913 Vann, with D-Cady Herrick [sic] and others, defended Governor William Sulzer during his impeachment trials. Although involved in the preparation of the defense, poor health prevented Vann from being present at the actual court proceedings. After the trial Vann refused to accept any payment for his work, claiming that since he was already an employee of the state, further remuneration was not required.

Vann died at his home in Syracuse on March 22, 1921. He was survived by his wife and their children. Their daughter, Florence, married Albert Perry Fowler (1867-1915), and it was their son, Albert Vann Fowler (1904-1968), who donated this collection to the New York State Library.

Scope and Content Note:

The correspondence in this collection covers 40 years of Irving G. Vann's life, and encompasses pieces from his personal, business, and political correspondence. The correspondence not only provides one with an extensive picture of Vann's personality, it also gives one a detailed picture of his involvement in various social causes, such as his suggestions for the improvement of the government's execution of the death penalty. Many of the items in his correspondence are related to his political career, including many letters containing his recommendations for various people to political positions including presidents, vice presidents, governors, and judges. There are letters from two presidents in the correspondence: two from William Howard Taft, one as president-elect and one as president, and two from Theodore Roosevelt, both from his time as governor of New York. The correspondence deals with many topics in the political and social realm: labor regulations, the Federal Reserve Act of 1913, various New York bar associations, capital crimes and their trials in New York State versus other states, Republican politics in New York, and the New York State Civil Service Committee. Most of his personal correspondence concerns the lives of other judges and their families.

The speeches in the collection provide not only a broad view of Irving G. Vann throughout his life, but also a broad representation of America and the American politics of his time. During his time at Yale Vann was a member of the then college literary society, now fraternity, Delta Kappa Epsilon. The earliest speeches in this collection are dissertations compiled for presentation and defense within his college literary society meetings. The later speeches in the collection date from the last decade of his life. The political topics covered by Vann in his speeches include Reconstruction, the impeachment of Andrew Jackson, the American legal system, Abraham Lincoln, the rise of modern medicine, women and the suffrage movement, the Panama Canal, public education in America. The speeches also include samples of his sentencing speeches, including three for capital crimes. Several of the speeches are directed towards Vann's Jewish constituency.

A large quantity of materials in this collection relates to the impeachment of Governor William Sulzer in 1913. There are manuscript drafts of Governor Sulzer's defense by Irving G. Vann, D-Cady Herrick, and Alton Parker, as well as many published court copies of the proceedings of the impeachment trial. Within the correspondence are letters and telegrams from Alton Parker discussing the scheduling of the trial. The scrapbook in Box 3 contains many clippings from New York State newspapers, at least two of which are in German, about the impeachment case. Each of the clippings was marked by the scrapbook's creator with the origin and date of the clipping. Within the scrapbook also are pieces of correspondence between counsel on the case and between counsel and Governor Sulzer, as well as a copy of the series of telegrams in support of Governor Sulzer that were sent to New York State periodicals. A bound copy of the Court of Impeachment Testimony, which contains the arguments, witnesses, and exhibits from the trial, is also in the collection. The entirely of this is found within Box 2; however because of the degradation of the binding this copy of the Testimony has been separated into folders by the date of the proceeding, with the original order of the publication respected.

Related Collections:

The holdings of the Onondaga Historical Association in Syracuse, New York, include a series of scrapbooks of clippings relative to the political and judicial career of Judge Irving Vann; scrapbooks containing invitations to banquets, memorial services, receptions, bar association activities, and the White House, 1892-1914; and a scrapbook of appointments and correspondence, related chiefly to judicial politics and activities, 1865-1891.

Box and Folder List:


Box Folder Description
    Correspondence.
    Letters by Irving G. Vann.
1 1
  1. To the Bar of the Fifth Judicial District, New York, October 17, 1918. Signed also by Chas. Andrews and Nathan L. Miller.
  2. To Hon. William Barnes, Jr., Syracuse, N.Y., September 17, 1910.
  3. To the Commission on Capital Punishment, Syracuse, N.Y., December 14, 1835 (later copy) attached to circular of Commission on Capital Punishment's, December 10, 1886.
  4. To Charles E. Hughes, July 11, 1917.
  5. To Henry W. Jessup, November 29, 1915.
  6. To Henry W. Jessup, December 13, 1915.
  7. To Mr. McCarthy, Syracuse, N.Y., June 20, 1893.
  8. Draft to Hon. Mr. Milburn, Syracuse, N.Y., April 18, 1913.
  9. To Judge O'Brien, Syracuse, N.Y., September 15, 1910.
  10. To Senator James A. O'Gorman, April 17, 1916.
  11. Tribute to Judge Alton Brooks Parker, undated.
  12. To William Howard Taft, Syracuse, N.Y., November 4, 1908.
  13. To Governor Charles S. Whitman, December 16, 1914.
  14. To Governor Timothy L. Woodruff, September 21, 1910.
    Letters to Irving G. Vann.
1 2 Letters to Irving G. Vann, A-C.
  1. ALS Chas. Adams, Newburgh, N.Y., September 19, 1910.
  2. ALS Charles Andrews, Albany, N.Y., December 3, 1895.
  3. TLS William Barnes, Jr., Albany, N.Y., September 19, 1910.
  4. TLS Willard Bartlett, September 16, 1910.
  5. ALS Willard Bartlett, Albany, N.Y., November 23, 1913.
  6. ALS Willard Bartlett, Brooklyn, N.Y., January 4, 1917.
  7. TLS Frank S. Black, Albany, N.Y., November 23, 1898.
  8. ALS Geo. B. Bradley, Corning, September 21, 1910.
  9. TLS Emory A. Chase, Catskill, N.Y., October 31, 1914.
  10. ALS John C. Churchill, Oswego, N.Y., December 6, 1895.
  11. TLS A. T. Clearwater, Kingston, N.Y., August 2, 1913.
  12. TLS D. Raymond Cobb, Albany, N.Y., August 14, 1915.
  13. TLS Frederick Collin, Elmira, N.Y., October 6, 1910.
  14. ALS W.H. Cuddeback, Buffalo, N.Y., November 8, 1912.
  15. ALS Edgar M. Cullen, Brooklyn, N.Y., May 31, 1906.
1 3 Letters to Irving G. Vann, D-J.
  1. TLS Chauncey M. Depew, New York, N.Y., November 9, 1908.
  2. ALS John R. Dos Passos, October 4, 1910.
  3. ALS Timothy Dwight, New Haven, Conn., September 29, 1898.
  4. TLS J. Newton Fiero, Albany, N.Y., December 7, 1915.
  5. TLS David L. Follett, Norwich, N.Y. September 15, 1894.
  6. ALS Albert Haight, Albany, N.Y., December 3, 1895.
  7. TLS Charles M. Harrington, Buffalo, N.Y., August 26, 1910.
  8. TLS Edward W. Hatch, New York, N.Y., June, 2, 1914.
  9. TLS D-Cady Herrick, August 1, 1913.
  10. ALS Frank H. Hiscock, December 15, 1884.
  11. TLS David B. Hill, Albany, N.Y., September 16, 1910.
  12. TLS Henry W. Hill, Buffalo, N.Y., August 19, 1910.
  13. TLS Charles E. Hughes, New York, N.Y., July 3, 1917.
  14. TLS Charles E. Hughes, New York, N.Y., July 13, 1917.
  15. TLS Charles E. Hughes, New York, N.Y., August 13, 1917.
  16. ALS Almet F. Jenks, Brooklyn, N.Y., June 25, 1914.
  17. TLS W. S. Jenney, Syracuse, N.Y., October 6, 1910.
  18. TLS Henry W. Jessup, New York, N.Y., November 8, 1915.
  19. TLS Henry W. Jessup, New York, N.Y., December 6, 1915.
1 4 Letters to Irving G. Vann, K-O.
  1. TLS George S. Klock, Albuquerque, N.M., November 7, 1910.
  2. ALS Martin A. Knapp, Washington, D.C., April 26, 1913.
  3. TLS Frederick W. Kruse, Rochester, N.Y., May 19, 1913.
  4. ALS L.S. Landon, Schenectady, N.Y., October 27, 1899.
  5. ALS Peter B. McLennan, July 24, 1910.
  6. TLS Peter B. McLennan, Ischua, N.Y., August 6, 1910.
  7. TLS John A. Mason, New York, N.Y., October 7, 1910.
  8. TLS Edward R. O'Malley, Buffalo, N.Y., October 31, 1916.
  9. ALS Lou Marshall, Albany, N.Y., February 14, 1918.
  10. TLS John G. Milburn, New York, N.Y., April 25, 1913.
  11. ALS Nathan L. Miller, Albany, N.Y., March 12, 1913.
  12. TLS Nathan L. Miller, Cortland, N.Y., July 27, 1915.
  13. ALS Morgan J. O'Brien, September 19, 1910.
  14. ALS Hugh Walker Ogden, Cambridge, Mass., April 3, 1895.
  15. TLS Thomas Mott Osborne, Auburn, N.Y., November 24, 1914.
1 5 Letters to Irving G. Vann P-S.
  1. TLS Alton B. Parker, New York, N.Y., September 13, 1910.
  2. TLS Alton B. Parker, New York, N.Y., September 21, 1910.
  3. TLS Alton B. Parker, New York, N.Y., July 2, 1913.
  4. Telegram Alton B. Parker, New York, N.Y., August 2, 1913.
  5. TLS Alton B. Parker, New York, N.Y., August 4, 1913.
  6. ALS Alton B. Parker, New York, N.Y., August 5, 1913.
  7. Telegram Alton B. Parker, New York, N.Y., August 8, 1913.
  8. ALS Amasa J. Parker, Albany, N.Y., June 3, 1913.
  9. TLS Theodore Roosevelt, Albany, N.Y., January 25, 1899. (copy: original stored in the vault)
  10. TLS Theodore Roosevelt, Albany, N.Y., December 18, 1899. (copy: original stored in the vault)
  11. TLS Elihu Root, January 27, 1915.
  12. TLS [James] T. Sherman, Utica, N.Y., June 26, 1912.
  13. TLS W. F. Shulan, New York, N.Y., October 4, 1910.
  14. TLS Alfred Spring, Franklinville, N.Y., October 1, 1910.
  15. TLS Thaddeus C. Sweet, Albany, N.Y., March 15, 1915.
1 6 Letters to Irving G. Vann T-W.
  1. TLS Henry W. Taft, New York, N.Y., December 15, 1915.
  2. TLS Henry W. Taft, New York, N.Y., December 21, 1915.
  3. TL William Howard Taft, Hot Springs, Va., November 30, 1908.
  4. TLS William Howard Taft, D.C., June 25, 1912. (copy: original stored in the vault)
  5. ALS J.B. Whitfield, October 2, 1910.
  6. TLS Charles S. Whitman, December 18, 1914.
  7. TLS George W. Wickersham, Albany, N.Y., April 28, 1915.
  8. TLS George W. Wickersham, Albany, N.Y., June 8, 1915.
  9. TLS T.S. Williams, September 20, 1892.
  10. TLS Timothy L. Woodruff, September 20, 1910.
    Letters neither by nor to Irving G. Vann.
  7
  1. TLS B.H.L. to the Senate Civil Service Committee, Albany, N.Y., March 4, 1915.
  2. TLS Louis Marshall to J. Newton Fiero, June 18, 1910.
  3. TLS Elihu Root to Charles L. Stone, December 9, 1895.
  4. TLS Benjamin F. Tracy to Charles Andrews, New York, N.Y., November 26, 1895.
    Letters to Judge Peter B. McLennan.
  7
  1. TLS Edgar T. Brackett, Sarasota Springs, N.Y., July 18, 1910.
  2. TLS Charles N. Bulger, Oswego, N.Y., July 22, 1910.
  3. TLS Thomas Carmody, July 18, 1910.
  4. TLS Henry G. Danforth, July 22, 1910.
  5. TLS H.R. Dufree, Palmyra, N.Y., July 27, 1910.
  6. TLS J.B. Fisher, Albany, N.Y., July 21, 1910.
  7. TLS F.D. Kilburn, Malone, N.Y., July 22, 1910.
  8. TLS George F. Lyon, Binghamton, N.Y., August 1, 1910.
  9. ALS Edgar S.K. Merrell, July 20, 1910.
  10. TLS James A. Robson, July 27, 1910.
  11. TLS Sanford E. North, Batavia, N.Y., July 23, 1910.
    Printed and typed materials relating to the impeachment of Governor Sulzer.
1 8
  1. "Upon Filing Articles of Impeachment, the Lieutenant-Governor Does Not Become Acting Governor", unsigned, Albany, N.Y., August 11, 1913.
  2. "Articles Exhibited by the Assembly and Summons to Governor Sulzer to Appear Before the Court of Impeachment," signed (in type) by Robert F. Wagner, president of the Senate, August 13, 1913.
  3. Memorandum of the challenges for arguments on the part of the managers of impeachment, unsigned, undated.
1 9
  1. Draft memorandum, "Can the Assembly prefer Articles of Impeachment against a public officer," typed with notations, unsigned, undated.
  2. Argument of D-Cady Herrick, counsel for the respondent, upon the challenge to senators being sworn as members of the court, unsigned, undated.
  3. "Legality of Extraordinary Session," with attached handwritten notes, undated, unsigned.
  4. Memorandum on impeachable offenses, undated, unsigned.
  5. Memorandum "Can a member of the Court of Impeachments be challenged for any reason?", undated, unsigned.
  6. "Memorandum on Procedure", undated, unsigned.
  7. "Impeachment Does Not Render Governor Functus Officio," undated, unsigned.
1 10
  1. "Argument of D-CADY HERRICK, one of Counsel for the Respondent, upon Objections to the Sufficiency of the First, Second, and Sixth Articles of Impeachment," printed, 1913.
  2. "Argument of D-CADY HERRICK, of Counsel for Respondent, upon Challenge to Senators being Sworn as Members of the Court," printed, 1913.
  3. "Memoranda for Argument on the Part of the Managers of Impeachment.—Subject: Challenges," printed, 1913. Two copies.
  4. "Articles Exhibited by the Assembly of the State of New York," printed, 1913.
  5. "Proposed Rules of the Court for the Trial of Impeachments," printed, 1913.
  6. "In Senate - Articles Exhibited by the Assembly of the State of New York," printed, August 13, 1913.
  7. "Argument of IRVING G. VANN, of Counsel for Respondent, upon the Sufficiency of Articles First, Second, and Sixth," printed, 1913.
1 11 "Argument of Louis Marshall on Motion to Dismiss for Want of Jurisdiction," printed, 1913.
1 12 "Impeachment of Gov. Sulzer - Read the Evidence Yourself," publication, 1913. In delicate condition.
1 13
  1. "Argument of D-CADY HERRICK, of Counsel for Respondent, upon Challenge to Senators being Sworn as Members of the Court," printed, 1913.
  2. "Argument of D-CADY HERRICK, one of Counsel for Respondent, upon Objections to the Sufficiency of the First, Second, and Sixth Articles of Impeachment," printed, 1913.
  3. "Argument of IRVING G. VANN, of Counsel for Respondent, upon the Sufficiency of Articles First, Second, and Sixth," printed, 1913.
    Speeches.
1 14
  1. Speech on judges and the undesirability of their recall, prepared to be given before the University Club of Brooklyn but unused, undated.
  2.  Speech on the education of African-Americans in the South, undated.
  3. Speech on veto power, given at Yale College, March 13, 1863.
  4. Speech titled "Mushrooms" on the inefficacy of 19th century statesmen attacking Abraham Lincoln, given at Yale College, February 12, 1863.
  5. Speech given before the Albany Bar Association upon Vann's retirement as Judge, 1912.
  6. Speech titled "Yale 50 Years Ago," delivered before The University Club, 1913.
  7. Speech in honor of Charles Andrews of Syracuse, N.Y., and Alton B. Parker, delivered before the Century Club, undated.
  8. Notes on the Presidential campaign of 1867 favoring the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, [1867].
1 15
  1. Speech memorializing Edward J. Bartlett given on behalf of the Onondaga Bar Association, 1910.
  2. Speech of introduction and notes from a Delta Kappa Epsilon meeting, 1895.
  3. Speech to Senator Dennis McCarthy, unused, undated.
  4. Speech on the Onondaga Bar Association, undated.
  5. Speech given at the Syracuse Jewish Fair to raise funds for the Jewish Orphan Asylum, 1880.
  6. Speech for the election of General Gustavus Sniper to the office of the County Clerk of Onondaga County, undated.
  7. Speech in honor of Bishop Haven, undated. Both manuscript and typed copies.
  8. Speech for the election of President James A. Garfield, unused, [ca. 1881].
  9. Speech and notes from the Delta Kappa Epsilon banquet on February 23, 1894.
  10. Speech on Robert Burns, undated.  Both manuscript and typed copies.
  11. Sentence of Eugene Guest, accused of assault in the second degree, to the States Prison in Auburn, N.Y., undated.
1 16
  1. Speeches to the Grand Jury of Onondaga County, undated.
  2. Resolutions honoring the late President James A. Garfield, [1881].
  3. Resolutions in memory of Judge Leroy Morgan, undated.
  4. Speech on women's suffrage, given before the Onondaga Bar Association banquet on February 9, 1882.
  5. Speech of welcome to "some distinguished gentlemen from Ireland" visiting the United States, undated.
  6. Notes on law, written on a New York Court of Appeals envelope, undated.
  7. Speech in honor of the retiring principal of Ithaca Academy, undated.
  8. Dissertation on the Protective Tariff, [ca. 1861-1864].
  9. Speech for the Yale Alumni meeting, representing the class of 1863, undated.
  10. Speech nominating A. J. Northrup for the office of County Judge, undated.  
  11. Speech in honor of ex-chief Judge Charles Andrews, delivered at a banquet in his honor at the University Club, undated.
  12. Notes in favor of the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, [ca.1866-1870].
  13. Speech on Reconstruction and promoting Ulysses S. Grant as President, [ca.1868-1869].
  14. Speech in memory of Chief Justice George F. Comstock, undated.
  15. Speech in memory of Judge William Z. Rugan, undated.
1 17
  1. Speech to a Grand Jury on charges of false election returns in one election district, undated.
  2. Speech on Memorial Day advocating for the erection of a war monument in Onondaga County commemorating the soldiers of "The War of Rebellion," year unknown.
  3. Speech to a grand jury on a case involving a prize fight, undated.
  4. Speech delivered after dinner to new members of the bar, undated.
  5. Speech on the election of Judge Hiscock as an associate judge of the Court of Appeals, delivered before the Onondaga Appellate Court, undated.
  6. Speech nominating George P. Heir as a candidate for Mayor of Syracuse, delivered at the Republican Convention, 1875.
  7. Sentence of Joshua Gifford for the murder of his wife, 1883.
  8. Notes on doctors, lawyers, and judges, undated.
  9. Speech against doctors, undated.
  10. Speech on the Panama Canal, delivered before the Men's Club of Syracuse, undated.
  11. Speech in memory of Page Munro, undated.
  12. Sentence of Cooper to life imprisonment in The People v. Cooper, undated.
1 18
  1. Speech on the mutual agreement between members of the Onondaga Bar Association, delivered at the annual dinner of the Onondaga Bar Association, 1881.
  2. Speech in memory of Judge Pratt.
  3. Speech on the value of education at Yale, given to the Yale Glee Club in Syracuse, N.Y., December 20, 1901.
  4. Speech on the Onondaga bar given before the Onondaga Bar Association, 1912.
  5. Dissertation on Mohammedanism, [ca.1859-1863].
  6. Speech given on Memorial Day to the G. A. R. of Syracuse, N.Y., [ca.1880-1889].
  7. Speech on the duties of a judge and the inadvisability of his recall, given before the Oswego County Bar Association, [ca.1913].
1 19 Newspaper- Syracuse, N.Y., Evening Herald, August 4, 1882.
    Court of Impeachment Testimony
2 1 Front cover.
2 2 "Index of Proceedings"
2 3 Proceedings of September 18, 1913. Pages 1-16.
2 4 Proceedings of September 19, 1913. Pages 17-142.
2 5 Proceedings of September 22, 1913. Pages 143-244.
2 6 Proceedings of September 23, 1913. Pages 245-392.
2 7 Proceedings of September 24, 1913. Pages 393-556.
2 8 Proceedings of September 25, 1913. Pages 557-708.
2 9 Proceedings of September 26, 1913. Pages 709-812.
2 10 Proceedings of September 29, 1913. Pages 813-900.
2 11 Proceedings of September 30, 1913. Pages 901-1020.
2 12 Proceedings of September 1, 1913. Pages 1021-1096.
2 13 Proceedings of October 2, 1913. Pages 1097-1110.
2 14 Proceedings of October 6, 1913. Pages 1111-1186.
2 15 Proceedings of October 7, 1913. Pages 1187-1292.
2 16 Proceedings of October 8, 1913. Pages 1293-1414.
2 17 "Index of Proceedings"
2 18 Proceedings of October 9, 1913. Pages 1415-1542.
2 19 Proceedings of October 10, 1913. Pages 1543-1640.
2 20 Proceedings of October 13, 1913. Pages 1641-1644.
2 21 Proceedings of October 14, 1913. Pages 1645-1700.
2 22 Proceedings of October 15, 1913. Pages 1701-1702.
2 23 Proceedings of October 16, 1913. Pages 1703-1824.
2 24 Proceedings of October 17, 1913. Pages 1825-1871.
2 25 Back cover.
    Scrapbook (folio)
3 2-56 Newspaper clippings relating to the William Sulzer impeachment, 1913.
3 57
  1. TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Vann, New York, N.Y., November 16, 1912.
  2. TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Vann, Albany, N.Y., May 15, 1913.
3 58
  1. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, Albany N.Y., August 15, 1913.
  2. TLS Chester C. Platt to Irving G. Vann, Albany, N.Y., September 10, 1913.
3 59
  1. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, August 11, 1913.
  2. TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Vann, Albany, N.Y., August 11, 1913.
3 60
  1. TLS J. Aspenwall Hodge to Irving G. Vann, August 14, 1913.
  2. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, August 16, 1913.
3 61 TLS Louis Marshall to Irving G. Vann, August 19, 1913.
3 62
  1. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to D-Cady Herrick, August 18, 1913.
  2. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, August 19, 1913.
  3. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, August 26, 1913.
  4. Copy of letter to D-Cady Herrick from Irving G. Vann, September 4, 1913.
3 63
  1. TLS Valentine Taylor, September 5, 1913.
  2. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, September 15, 1913.
3 64 Excerpt from the Knickerbocker Press, August 11, 1913.
3 65
  1. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, September 25, 1913.
  2. ALS Austen G. Fox to Irving G. Vann, Albany, N.Y., September 25, 1913.
3 66
  1. TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Van, October 1, 1913.
  2. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to William Sulzer, October 3, 1913.
3 67
  1. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to D-Cady Herrick, October 3, 1913.
  2. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, October 13, 1913.
3 68
  1. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to D-Cady Herrick, October 17, 1913.
  2. TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Vann, October 18, 1913.
3 69
  1. TLS James Creelman to Irving G. Vann, October 22, 1913.
  2. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to James Creelman, October 24, 1913.
3 70
  1. TLS Louis Marshall to Irving G. Vann, October 29, 1913.
  2. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to Thomas Carmody, December 18, 1913.
  3. TLS Thomas Cormody to Irving G. Vann, December 22, 1913.
3 71
  1. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to D-Cady Herrick, December 15, 1913.
  2. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, December 17, 1913.
3 72
  1. TLS Thomas C. Spelling to Irving G. Vann, December 13, 1913.
  2. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to Thomas C. Spelling, December 15, 1913.
3 73
  1. TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Vann, February 6, 1914.
  2. Copy of letter from Irving G. Vann to William Sulzer, February 10, 1914.
3 74
  1. TLS D-Cady Herrick to Irving G. Vann, February 13, 1914.
  2. TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Vann, February 13, 1914.
3 75
  1. Copy of letter from Counsel to William Sulzer, October 5, 1913.
  2. Copy of letter from William Sulzer to Counsel, October 8, 1913.
3 76 TLS Judge Frank Hiscock to Irving G. Vann, Albany, N.Y., February 25, 1914.
3 77 TLS William Sulzer to Irving G. Vann, December 8, 1916.
3 79-88 Copy of telegrams in support of William Sulzer sent to newspapers by William Sulzer's office, August 17, 1913.
Last Updated: October 16, 2013