The Adirondack Forty-Sixers
Records, 1940-2013; bulk 1970-2013

SC19467

Quantity: 93.0 cubic ft. (308 boxes: Series I: 192 boxes; Series II: 32 boxes; Series III: 18 boxes; Series IV: 5 boxes; Series V: 61 boxes)
Access: Records are open to research upon signing agreement regarding publication and photoduplication of contents.  Please see Research Use and Access note for further information.
Acquisition: The Adirondack Forty-Sixers designated the New York State Library as the official repository for its records in March 1990.  Accretions have been received by this repository periodically, often annually, since May 1993.
Processed By: Fred Bassett, Senior Librarian, New York State Library Manuscripts and Special Collections, March 1991; last revised March 2014.

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Historical Note:

The Adirondack Forty-Sixersexternal link can trace its origins back to 1936 when Ernest R. Ryder and Edward L. Hudowalski formed a social club for like-minded individuals who had successfully climbed to the summit of the forty-six peaks in the Adirondack Mountain Range that are four thousand feet or higher in elevation.  It was originally known as the Troy Forty-Sixers, as the founders and other early members were residents of that city and surrounding communities.  On May 30, 1948 this club was formally incorporated by the State of New York as the Adirondack Forty-Sixers in an effort to secure a larger geographic base from which it could attract new members.  Today, it has members from almost every state and some foreign countries, though the large majority is from New York and other northeastern states.  The organization meets several times a year offering special programs not only on mountain climbing, but also on such topics as history, ecology, and geology of the Adirondacks.  In addition, they hold an annual business meeting to recognize new members, elect officers, adopt a budget, and consider other organizational matters.  The annual business meeting is generally held in May.  There is also a special category known as the Winter 46ers to recognize individuals who have climbed all the high peaks during the winter months when weather conditions make the task especially difficult.

Scope and Content Note:

The records of the Adirondack Forty-Sixersexternal link are organized into five series: I) Correspondence; II) Questionnaires; III) Winter Forty-Sixers Records; IV) Historical Files and Personal Narratives; and V) Summit Logbooks.  The correspondence files are comprised chiefly of letters between Grace (Mrs. Edward) Hudowalski, longtime secretary/historian for the organization, and individual climbers.  Letters from the climbers consist generally of descriptions of their ascents to the summits of mountains along with dates, times, and names of fellow climbers.  Grace Hudowalski's letters are more than brief congratulatory notes; they contain many interesting personal recollections and reminiscences of her own and others' experiences in climbing particular peaks.  Since 1999 other individuals holding the office of club historian have answered the correspondence.  Correspondence files are generally arranged in chronological units that are subdivided alphabetically by surname.  Prior to 1985, these files cover multiple years. Thereafter, the correspondence files according to the year (class) in which individuals completed the task of climbing the requisite 46 peaks. Within the file for a particular individual, the letters can range from a few days to several years depending on how long it took to accomplish the feat. In these files the membership number for each individual is noted as a cross-reference to his/her questionnaire.

The questionnaire series is comprised of general information forms submitted by the individual climber after he or she has successfully conquered all forty-six Adirondack peaks having an elevation of 4,000 feet or more.  These forms contain biographical and other general information about an individual’s hiking and mountain climbing experiences.  Most forms include an attached list of the forty-six peaks climbed; on the list, the climber notes the date each peak was climbed, companions, and other remarks.  Many forms have a photograph of the climber that was usually taken when the feat of all forty-six was accomplished.  These forms are arranged in numerical order according to the membership number assigned to an individual upon verification of having reached the summit of all 46 peaks.  The forms commenced in 1948 with information submitted retrospectively from 53 individuals known to have accomplished the feat prior to that year.  These records show that Herbert Clark, George Marshall, and Robert Marshall, were the first three to climb all 46 peeks over a period of years from 1918 to 1925. Many of the other early members accomplished the feat between 1933 and 1941. Beginning with 1970, an annual list of names precedes the questionnaire forms.  Beginning in 1999 a copy of the questionnaire is also filed with the correspondence.

The Winter Forty-Sixers’ records consist of correspondence and reports much like that of the first two series.  Included is a subseries of each individual’s winter climbing record that has been filed chronologically beginning in 1962.  This is followed by a series of correspondence and reports arranged alphabetically by surname.  In both subseries an individual’s regular membership number, appended with "w," is noted. 

The historical files and personal narratives consist mostly of unpublished manuscripts related to the history of the organization or special reminiscences of individual members. Here is included an annotated manuscript of the published history compiled by Dorothy O. Haeusser, et al, circa 1958.

The personal narratives, compiled by Kevin B. MacKenzie and Jeffery R. Harper, are lavishly illustrated with photographs. This series also includes news clippings, programs, and issues of Smoke Signals, the organization’s newsletter, and a video cassette of the 1992 membership meeting.

The summit logbooks were maintained in canisters on the summits of 24 of the high peaks, and contain signed names and comments from climbers who scaled the peaks between 1946 and 2001. The logbooks are arranged alphabetically by mountain and thereafter chronologically. 

The correspondence, questionnaires, logbooks and other materials altogether comprise a valuable archive for the study of hiking and mountaineering activities in the Adirondacks as well as the growth and development of these activities as a popular form of recreation. 

Related Collections:

This repository has a number of other collections related to the history of outdoor recreation in the Adirondack Mountains.  One of the early members of the 46ers, C. Howard Nash compiled an excellent collection of photographs and journal of his hiking experiences in the Adirondack Mountains and other ranges in New York and New England. The records of the Adirondack Mountain Club (1922- ) details its work in establishing and maintaining hiking trails as well as publishing guides to hiking trails in the Adirondacks.

Research Use and Access

To use the records of the Adirondack Forty-Sixers, researchers must sign the “Conditions of Use of Records of Adirondack Forty-Sixers” form in which they agree not to publish anything about or from these records that indicates any identifiable surnames without the express written permission of the persons named.  Researchers also understand that literary rights to any correspondence or other documents found in these records reside with the writer of the correspondence or other documents.  It is the explicit responsibility of researchers to seek permission of those writers during their lifetime or their heirs fifty years thereafter prior to citing, quoting, or publishing from the correspondence or other documents.

Series Description and Container List:

Series I: Correspondence, 1940-2013

The correspondence series consist chiefly of letters exchanged between the individual climber  and the secretary/ historian of the Adirondack Forty-Sixers. Prior to 1999, the task was handled by Grace (Mrs. Edward) Hudowalski, who served as secretary/historian for the organization for many years.  Letters from the climbers consist generally of descriptions of their ascents to the summits of mountains along with dates, times, and names of fellow climbers.  Grace Hudowalski's letters are more than brief congratulatory notes; they contain many interesting personal recollections and reminiscences of her own and others' experiences in climbing particular peaks.  Since 1999 other individuals holding the office of club historian have answered the correspondence.  Correspondence files are generally arranged in chronological units that are subdivided alphabetically by surname.  Prior to 1985, these files cover multiple years. Thereafter, the correspondence files according to the year (class) in which individuals completed the task of climbing the requisite 46 peaks. Within the file for a particular individual, the letters can range from a few days to several years depending on how long it took to accomplish the feat. In these files the membership number for each individual is noted as a cross-reference to his/her questionnaire. 

Box Description
  1940-1969 Correspondence (1-589)
1 A-Fr
2 Ga-Mc
3 Ma-Z
  1970-1972 Correspondence (590-865)
4 A-J
5 K-Z
  1973-1974 Correspondence (866-1158)
6 A-Ha
7 He-Rh
8 Ri-Z
  1975 Correspondence (1159-1284)
8 A-E
9 F-Z
  1976-1977 Correspondence (1285-1460)
10 A-Ho
11 K-Z
  1978-1980 Correspondence (1461-1662)
12 A-Fu
13 G-O
14 P-Z
  1981-1982 Correspondence (1663-1830)
14 A
15 B-L
16 M-V
17 W-Z
  1983-1984 Correspondence (1831-2064)
17 A-Ch
18 Cl-K
19 L-Sc
20 St-Z
20 1985 Correspondence (2065-2195)
20 A-Ch
21 Co-M
22 N-Y
  1986 Correspondence (2196-2314)
23 A-J
24 K-T
25 U-Z
  1987 Correspondence (2315-2456)
25 A-De
26 Di-L
27 M-Z
  1988 Correspondence (2457-2575)
28 A-H
29 I-R
30 S-Z
  1989 Correspondence (2576-2712)
30 A-B
31 C-K
32 L-S
33 T-Z
  1990 Correspondence (2713-2859)
33 A-E
34 F-Le
35 Li-Pl
36 Po-V
37 W-Z
  1991 Correspondence (2860-3041)
37 A-D
38 E-Kee
39 Keh-Mon
40 Moo-Se
41 Sh-Z
  1992 Correspondence (3042-3186)
42 A-Fr
43 G-Mc
44 Ma-Sm
45 So-Z
  1993 Correspondence (3187-3371)
46 A-Dar
47 Dau-Hob
48 Hof-Lun
49 Mag-Slo
50 Smi-Z
  1994 Correspondence (3372-3566)
51 A-Cha
52 Che-F
53 G-K
54 L-O
55 P-Sh
56 Si-Woods, C.
57 Woods, F.-Z
  1995 Correspondence (3567-3832)
57 A-Bru
58 Bu-De
59 Di-Fu
60 G-He
61 Hi-Knu
62 Kon-Mu
63 N-Ri
64 Ro-Th
65 To-Z
  1996 Correspondence (3833-4052)
66 A-Bul
67 Buo-F
68 G-K
69 L-Mo
70 Mu-Sa
71 Sc-Z
  1997 Correspondence (4053-4249)
72 A-Che
73 Cho-F
74 G-J
75 K-Mo
76 Mu-Sch
77 Sco-To
78 Tu-Z
  1998 Correspondence (4250-4447)
79 A-Dob
80 Dou-Han
81 Har-Kir
82 Kla-Loe
83 Lom-M
84 N-R
85 S
86 T-Z
  1999 Correspondence (4448-4638)
87 A-Clem
88 Co-Fer
89 Fl-J
90 K-M
91 N-R
92 S-Tay
93 Ter-Z
  2000 Correspondence (4639-4771)
94 A-B
95 C-F
96 G-Kin
97 Kro-Sea
98 Sha-V
99 W-Z
  2001 (4772-4934)
99 A-Cit
100 Cle-E
101 F-Kea
102 Kel-M
103 N-Squi
104 Ste-Z
  2002 Correspondence (4935-5155)
105 A-B
106 C-Fin
107 Fin-Hen
108 Hor-Mil
109 Min-R
110 S-T
111 U-Z
  2003 Correspondence (5156-5327)
111 A-B
111A Barney, Walter B. (#5311)
112 C-D
113 E-Haz
114 Hed-K
115 L-M
116 O-Sch
117 Sli-Z
  2004 Correspondence (5328-5536)
118 A-Cas
119 Cha-Dou
120 Dro-Her
121 Hig-L
122 Ma-Moore (includes Mac, Mc)
123 Mul-Rus
124 S-Ter
125 Tho-Z
  2005 Correspondence (5537-5743)
126 A-B
127 C-F
128 G-J
129 K-L
130 M-P
131 Q-Sh
132 Si-Z
  2006 Correspondence (5744-5964)
133 A-Cas
134 Cha-D
135 E-H
136 I-L
137 M-O
138 P-Smi
139 Som-Z
  2007 Correspondence (5965-6212)
140 A-B
141 C-F
142 G-Hui
143 Hul-Mau
144 Mc-Pat
145 Pen-Slo
146 Smi-V
147 W-Z
  2008 Correspondence (6213-6385)
148 A-Con
149 Coo-F
150 G-La
151 Le-P
152 Q-Z
  2009 Correspondence (6386-6680)
153 A-B
154 C-E
155 F-J
156 K-Lip
157 Lis-M
158 N-Sco
159 Sim-War
160 Web-Z
  2010 Correspondence (6681-7009)
161 A-Cha
162 Che-Ga
163 Ge-K
164 La-Mi
165 Mo-Rob
166 Roc-Ste
167 Sto-Z
  2011 Correspondence (7010-7355)
168 A-Cha
169 Cla-Fin
170 Fir-K
171 La-Mis
172 Mit-Ry
173 Sa-Ve
174 Vi-Z
  2012 Correspondence (7356-7805)
175 A-Bou
176 Bra-Cyn
177 Da-Fu
178 Ga-Hum
179 Hur-Ku
180 La-Mal
181 Man-Nye
182 O-Rut
183 Sa-Tul
184 Tun-Z
  2013 Correspondence (7806-8285)
185 Aa-Bu
186 Ca-Dem
187 Den-Glu
188 Go-Ku
189 La-Nee
190 Nem-Sco
191 Se-Vol
192 Von-Z

Series II: Questionnaires, 1948-2013

The questionnaire series is comprised of general information forms submitted by the individual climber after he or she has successfully conquered all forty-six Adirondack peaks having an elevation of 4,000 feet or more.  These forms contain biographical and other general information about an individual’s hiking and mountain climbing experiences.  Most forms include an attached list of the forty-six peaks climbed; on the list, the climber notes the date each peak was climbed, companions, and other remarks.  Many forms have a photograph of the climber that was usually taken when the feat of all forty-six was accomplished.  These forms are arranged in numerical order according to the membership number assigned to an individual upon verification of having reached the summit of all 46 peaks.  The forms commenced in 1948 with information submitted retrospectively from 53 individuals known to have accomplished the feat prior to that year.  These records show that Herbert Clark, George Marshall, and Robert Marshall, were the first three to climb all 46 peeks over a period of years from 1918 to 1925. Many of the other early members accomplished the feat between 1933 and 1941. Beginning with 1970, an annual list of names precedes the questionnaire forms.  Beginning in 1999 a copy of the questionnaire is also filed with the correspondence.

Box Description
II-1 1948-1964 (1-318) 
II-2 1965-1967 (319-460)
II-2 1968 (461-518)
II-3 1969 (519-589)
II-3 1970 (590-668)
II-3 1971 (669-719)
II-4 1971 (720-771)
II-4 1972 (772-865)
II-4 1973 (866-950)
II-5 1973 (951-992)
II-5 1974 (993-1158)
II-6 1975 (1159-1284)
II-6 1976 (1285-1412)
II-7 1977 (1413-1460)
II-7 1978 (1461-1527)
II-7 1979 (1528-1586)
II-8 1980 (1587-1662)
II-8 1981 (1663-1738)
II-8 1982 (1739-1830)
II-9 1983 (1831-1948)
II-9 1984 (1949-2064)
II-10 1985 (2065-2195)
II-10 1986 (2196-2314)
II-11 1987 (2315-2456)
II-11 1988 (2457-2575)
II-12 1989 (2576-2712)
II-12 1990 (2713-2859)
II-13 1991 (2860-3041)
II-13 1992 (3042-3100)
II-14 1992 (3101-3186)
II-14 1993 (3187-3371)
II-15 1994 (3372-3566)
II-15 1995 (3567-3600)
II-16 1995 (3601-3832)
II-17 1996 (3833-4052)
II-18 1997 (4053-4249)
II-19 1998 (4250-4447)
II-19 1999 (4448-4525)
II-20 1999 (4526-4638)
II-20 2000 (4639-4771)
II-20 2001 (4772-4800)
II-21 2001 (4801-4934)
II-21 2002 (4935-5100)
II-22 2002 (5101-5155)
II-22 2003 (5156-5327)
II-23 2004 (5328-5536)
II-24 2005 (5537-5743)
II-24 2006 (5744-5875)
II-25 2006 (5876-5964)
II-25 2007 (5965-6212)
II-26 2008 (6213-6385)
II-27 2009 (6386-6680)
II-28 2010 (6681-7009)
II-29 2011 (7010-7355)
II-30 2012 (7356-7675)
II-31 2012 (7676-7805)
II-32 2012 (7806-8285)
Series III: Winter 46ers Records, 1962-2011

The Winter Forty-Sixers’ records consist of correspondence and reports much like that of the first two series.  Included is a subseries of each individual’s winter climbing record that has been filed chronologically beginning in 1962.  This is followed by a series of correspondence and reports arranged alphabetically by surname.  In both subseries an individual’s regular membership number, appended with "w," is noted. 

Box Description
III-1 Reports, 1962-1966 (Filed Chronologically)
  Correspondence and Reports, 1962-1997 (Filed Alphabetically)
III-2 A-E
III-3 F-K
III-4 L-Sh
III-5 Sm-Z
III-6 A-Z, 1998-1999
  Correspondence and Reports, 2000-2006
III-7 A-D
III-8 E-G
III-9 H-J
III-10 K-Mo
III-11 Mu-S
III-12 T-Z
  Correspondence and Reports, 2007-2011
III-13 A-Ci
III-14 Cl-Do
III-15 Du-Ken
III-16 Kle-Mu
III-17 N-Tra
III-18 Tur-Z

Series IV:  Historical Files and Personal Narratives, 1958-2004

The historical files and personal narratives consist mostly of unpublished manuscripts related to the history of the organization or special reminiscences of individual members. Here is included an annotated manuscript of the published history compiled by Dorothy O. Haeusser.

The personal narratives, compiled by Kevin B. MacKenzie and Jeffery R. Harper, are lavishly illustrated with photographs. This series also includes news clippings, programs, and issues of Smoke Signals, the organization’s newsletter, and a video cassette of the 1992 membership meeting.

Box Description
IV-1 Manuscript of “The Adirondack Forty-Sixers” and other historical materials compiled by Grace Hudowalski, circa 1958-1994.
IV-2 “The Long Road Home: An Adirondack Journey: Trials and Triumphs in the Wilderness of New York’s High Peaks” by Kevin B. MacKenzie; unpublished manuscript, ca. 2004 (215p.)
IV-3 “Adirondack Adventures, 1993-2004” by Jeffrey R. Harper; unpublished manuscript, ca. 2005 (3 v.)
IV-4 Videocassette recording of the annual meeting, 1992
IV-5 Film: “1950 Adirondack” – available in DVD, Digital Betacam, and 16 mm. reel formats

Series V: Summit Logbooks, 1946-2001

The summit logbooks were maintained in canisters on the summits of 24 of the high peaks, and contain signed names and comments from climbers who scaled the peaks between 1946 and 2001. The logbooks are arranged alphabetically by mountain and thereafter chronologically. 

Box Description
  Allen Mountain:
V-1 Sept. 1, 1946-Aug. 31, 1985
V-2 Aug. 31, 1985-Sept. 16, 1995
V-3 Sept. 16, 1995-May 28, 2000
  Cliff Mountain:
V-4 Oct. 19, 1974-Aug. 6, 1992
V-5 Aug. 8, 1992-June 9, 2001
  Couchsachraga Peak:
V-6 Aug. 10, 1956- June 5, 1990
V-7 June 5, 1990-June 23, 2001
  Mount Donaldson:
V-8 July 17, 1964-July 13, 1991
V-9 July 14, 1991-June 27, 2001
  East Dix:
V-10 Oct. 14, 1949-July 15, 1983
V-11 July 9, 1983-Aug. 5, 1994
V-12 Aug. 5, 1994- June 23, 2001
  Mount Emmons:
V-13 Sept. 3, 1950-July 13, 1991
V-14 July 14, 1991-June 27, 2001
  Esther Mountain:
V-15 July 29, 1946-Oct. 17, 1983
V-16 Oct. 15, 1983-Dec. 31, 1993
V-17 March 9, 1994-June 10, 2001
  Gray Peak:
V-18 Sept. 26, 1947- June 17, 1982
V-19 June 17, 1982-May 28, 1994
V-20 May 28, 1994-June 7, 2001
  Hoffman Mountain:
V-21 Sept. 17, 1957-April 19, 1958
  Hough Peak:
V-21 Aug. 17, 1956-Aug. 18, 1981
V-22 Aug. 18, 1981-Aug. 12, 1992
V-23 Aug. 12, 1992-June 4, 2000
  Iroquois Peak:
V-24 Aug. 12, 1967-Oct. 11, 1995
  MacNaughton Mountain:
V-25 Aug. 19, 1957-May 16, 2004
  Macomb Mountain:
V-26 1956-July 28, 1977
V-27 July 31, 1977-July 6, 1990
V-28 July 6, 1990-March 5, 1997
V-29 April 26, 1997-May 15, 2001
  Mount Marshall:
V-30 Aug. 4, 1946-July 25, 1978
V-31 July 26, 1978-Oct. 8, 1992
V-32 Oct. 11, 1992-Oct. 1, 2000
  Nye Mountain:
V-33 Aug. 5, 1946-July 29, 1984
V-34 July 29, 1984-Aug. 23, 1992
V-35 Aug. 23, 1992- June 23, 2001
  Panther Peak:
V-36 July 9, 1961-June 5, 1990
V-37 June 5, 1990-June 23, 2001
  Phelps Mountain:
V-38 Aug. 1, 1960-April 24, 1971
  Redfield:
V-39 Aug. 6, 1946-July 31, 1982
V-40 July 31, 1982-Aug. 6, 1994
V-41 Aug. 6, 1994-July 1, 2001
  Rocky Peak Ridge
V-42 July 25, 1946-May 29, 1968
  Santanoni Peak:
V-43 July 5, 1957-Sept. 4, 1978
V-44 Sept. 9, 1978-May 29, 1991
V-45 June 2, 1991-Sept. 7, 1997
V-46 Sept 6, 1997 [sic] – July 6, 2001
  Seward Mountain:
V-47 Aug. 12, 1946-June 29, 1986
V-48 June 29, 1986-Sept. 4, 1994
V-49 Sept. 10, 1994-June 29, 2001
  Seymour Mountain:
V-50 Aug. 11, 1946-Oct. 9, 1982
V-51 Oct. 27, 1982-Sept. 9, 1994
V-52 Sept. 10, 1994-June 24, 2001
  South Dix:
V-53 Aug. 31, 1946-Oct. 10, 1981
V-54 May 21, 1982-Aug. 1, 1993
V-55 Aug. 1, 1993-June 4, 2000
  Street Mountain:
V-56 1949-Oct. 31, 1982
V-57 June 5, 1983-July 31, 1994
V-58 Aug. 1, 1994-June 23, 2001
  Table Top Mountain:
V-59 May 30, 1952-April 14, 1983
V-60 April 16, 1983-Sept. 29, 1994
V-61 August 29, 1994-Feb. 24, 2001
Last Updated: April 10, 2014