The New York State Library Services and Technology Act Five-Year Plan


The New York State Library Services and Technology Act Five-Year Plan

October 1, 2012–September 30, 2017
FY 2013–2017

A Focused Program for the
Improvement of Library Services for the People of New York State
Utilizing Local, State, and Federal Resources

The University of the State of New York
The State Education Department
The New York State Library
Cultural Education Center
Albany, New York 12230
2012

Contents | This document in .PDF format pdf icon [207k]

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK

Regents of The University

Merryl H. Tisch, Chancellor, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.

New York
Anthony S. Bottar, Vice Chancellor, B.A., J.D. Syracuse
Robert M. Bennett, Chancellor Emeritus, B.A., M.S. Tonawanda
James C. Dawson, A.A., B.A., M.S., Ph.D. Plattsburgh
Geraldine D. Chapey, B.A., M.A., Ed.D. Belle Harbor
Harry Phillips, 3rd, B.A., M.S.F.S. Hartsdale
James R. Tallon, Jr., B.A., M.A. Binghamton
Roger Tilles, B.A., J.D. Great Neck
Charles R. Bendit, B.A. Manhattan
Betty A. Rosa, B.A., M.S. in Ed., M.S. in Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D. Bronx
Lester W. Young, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ed. D. Oakland Gardens
Christine D. Cea, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Staten Island
Wade S. Norwood, B.A. Rochester
James O. Jackson, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Albany
Kathleen M. Cashin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D. Brooklyn
James E. Cottrell, B.S., M.D. New York
T. Andrew Brown, B.A., J.D. Rochester

President of The University and Commissioner of Education

JOHN B. KING, JR.

Executive Deputy Commissioner

VALERIE GREY

Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education

JEFFREY W. CANNELL

Assistant Commissioner for Libraries and State Librarian

BERNARD A. MARGOLIS

The New York State Education Department does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, race, gender, genetic predisposition or carrier status, or sexual orientation in its educational programs, services, and activities.  Portions of this publication can be made available in a variety of formats, including Braille, large print, or audio tape, upon request. Inquiries concerning this policy of nondiscrimination should be directed to the Department’s Office for Diversity, Ethics, and Access, Room 530, Education Building, Albany, NY 12234. Requests for additional copies of this publication may be made by contacting the New York State Library, Division of Library Development, Cultural Education Center 10B41, Albany, NY 12230.

Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

INTRODUCTION

MISSION

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT

SUMMARY OF GOALS

GOALS OF THE PLAN: ACTIVITIES, OUTCOMES AND OUTPUTS

Goal 1: All New Yorkers will have improved access to library resources that advance and enhance their personal, educational and working lives.

Program Activities

Key Output Targets

Key Outcome Targets

Goal 2: The New York State Library, library systems and libraries will deliver new and improved library programs that anticipate and meet New Yorkers' constantly changing needs for library services.

Program Activities

Key Output Targets

Key Outcome Targets

Goal 3: New Yorkers of all ages will perceive libraries as community learning spaces offering high-quality lifelong learning, literacy, and knowledge creation opportunities that enhance civic engagement and economic vitality.

Program Activities

Key Output Targets

Key Outcome Targets

Goal 4: All New Yorkers will benefit from statewide programs and services of the New York State Library that effectively leverage private and public funding through collaboration and partnerships and maximize value in order to achieve goals one, two and three.

Program Activities

Key Output Targets

Key Outcome Targets

COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC AVAILABILITY

EVALUATION PLAN AND MONITORING PROCEDURES

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The following pages describe in detail New York State’s Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Five-Year Plan for the period October 1, 2012, through September 30, 2017.

The federal Institute of Museum and Library Services, which administers the LSTA Program, requires a Five-Year Plan that describes the State Library’s mission, the library service needs identified for the state, and the ways in which the state plans to use Library Services and Technology Act funds to meet those needs.

This 2012-17 Five-Year Plan consists of four major goals:

  1. All New Yorkers will have improved access to library resources that advance and enhance their personal, educational and working lives.
  2. The New York State Library, library systems and libraries will deliver new and improved library programs that anticipate and meet New Yorkers' constantly changing needs for library services.
  3. New Yorkers of all ages will perceive libraries as community learning spaces offering high-quality lifelong learning, literacy, and knowledge creation opportunities that enhance civic engagement and economic vitality.
  4. All New Yorkers will benefit from statewide programs and services of the New York State Library that effectively leverage private and public funding through collaboration and partnerships and maximize value in order to achieve goals one, two and three.

Each of these four goals is closely linked to recommendations issued in 2012 by the New York State Regents Advisory Council on Libraries and to one or more of the priorities of the Library Services and Technology Act (listed under “Needs Assessment”).

In 2010, the Board of Regents charged the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to take a visionary look at the future of library services and develop a comprehensive set of policy recommendations to improve library services to the people of New York State. The resulting report, Creating the Future:  A 2020 Vision and Plan for Library Service in New York State— Recommendations of the New York State Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to the New York State Board of Regents, includes sixty recommendations for creating “excellent libraries and library services.” Additional documents used in assessing needs included, but were not limited to, the 2012 State Library Opinion Survey, the LSTA 2007-2012 evaluation report, and New York State Education Department Office of Cultural Education strategic priorities.  See a full list of resources.

In the description of each of the four goals and its supporting activities, the plan notes specific evaluation measures, i.e., key output targets and key outcome targets.  The State Library will track outputs and outcomes, enabling accurate evaluation of the success of the program in reaching its goals, as well as efficient and effective use of LSTA resources.

The 2012-2017 Five-Year Plan was developed in consultation with the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries. It has been available for public comment during its development, and incorporates input from many key stakeholder groups.

The State Library will continue to involve key stakeholders in various aspects of the 2012-2017 LSTA Five Year Plan’s implementation.  The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries will ensure that the execution of the plan is coordinated with the overall plan and priorities of the New York State Library, resulting in unified state library policy in terms of federal, state and private fund expenditures.

LSTA Five-Year Plan
October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2017

INTRODUCTION

The Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA), a federal program for libraries administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), requires a five-year plan from each state. This document outlines New York’s fourth LSTA Five-Year Plan, developed primarily from the findings and recommendations of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries and from the evaluation study of the first four years of the former plan carried out by an independent evaluation consultant. The plan covers the period October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2017.

The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries is appointed by the Board of Regents of The University of the State of New York. Because libraries, including the New York State Library, are the responsibility of the Board of Regents, policy on library services is part of education policy in New York State.

The State Library includes the Division of Library Development and the Research Library.  The Division of Library Development provides leadership, funding, and expert assistance for all New York’s libraries and library systems.  Staff experts work with librarians, trustees, public officials, and local leaders to ensure that library resources are available to all their communities.  Library Development administers more than $100 million in state and federal aid to New York’s libraries, and facilitates participation in federal, state, and private funding programs.

The Research Library is the principal library for New York State government and serves New Yorkers and New York’s libraries statewide.  Its collection of more than 20 million items makes it one of the 125 largest research libraries in North America. It is the only State Library to qualify for membership in the Association of Research Libraries.

More than 7,000 libraries serve the people of New York.  Most of these libraries are linked with others in resource-sharing library systems and networks.  New York’s Library Services and Technology Act program reaches libraries through their systems and through statewide services.

The State Library and New York State’s library systems work together as partners to expand and improve statewide library services and to implement initiatives and activities such as those described in this plan.  Three different types of library systems connect and serve the state’s libraries as follows:

Public Libraries and Library Systems: Some 755 public libraries with 1069 outlets serve the people of New York State. All but one of the 755 public libraries are members of one of the state’s 23 public library systems. New York State’s public libraries range in size from The New York Public Library which serves 3.3 million people through 90 outlets to the Thousand Island Park Library which serves a population of 121 in rural Jefferson County. Fifty nine per cent of New York’s public libraries serve populations of less than 7500 and therefore are not required to employ a certified library director with a Masters Degree in Library and Information Science.

Reference and Research Library Resources Systems: Nine regional consortia, encompassing all of New York State, include libraries in public and private colleges and universities, special libraries, public libraries and public library systems, and school library systems in a complex network of resource sharing. These systems serve their regions and the entire state as an important link to the rich and varied resources of the special, college, and university libraries and provide a strong program of professional development for library staff. As of 2011, the state had 271 degree-granting institutions of higher education, including 83 public, 148 independent, and 40 proprietary.

School Libraries and Library Systems: Forty-one school library systems serve 4,437 school libraries in 713 public school districts and 485 nonpublic schools statewide, enabling them to participate in resource sharing with all types of libraries, professional development, and other services. 

MISSION

The mission of the New York State Education Department—“To raise the knowledge, skill, and opportunity of all the people in New York”—provides direction for libraries, archives, and museums, as well as the formal educational structure of schools and colleges.

The Office of Cultural Education, a major unit of the State Education Department encompassing the State Library, the State Archives, the State Museum and the Office of Public Broadcasting, operates under the following principles:

  • a focus on the public as primary audience;
  • a focus on statewide impact and value;
  • inclusion of an educational component accessible to a variety of learning levels in all activities;
  • stewardship of collections, including research and availability for use;
  • digital technology as a component of all activities.

The Office of Cultural Education’s collections serve as primary material for all New Yorkers in developing their knowledge. The Office supports the State Education Department’s mission through its commitment to infusing educational activities throughout its services and presentation of collections.

The mission of the New York State Library, through the Division of Library Development and the Research Library, is “to provide leadership and guidance for the planning and coordinated development of library services and to serve as a reference and research library for the people of the State.” The State Library works in partnership with the three types of library systems to carry out planning and coordination for the development of library services throughout the state.

New York’s 2012-2017 LSTA Plan supports all of these missions by strengthening the provision of library services that help all New Yorkers access the wealth of information in collections across the state and beyond. Activities in the plan will provide New Yorkers instruction in new and existing tools to unlock the information in those collections and through the Internet. The State Library will augment its programs through a wide range of strategic partnerships in order to achieve better reach and service to the State’s residents.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

This plan operates under priorities established by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and based in Library Services and Technology Act law.

LSTA priorities:

  1. expand services for learning and access to information and educational resources in a variety of formats, in all types of libraries, for individuals of all ages in order to support such individuals' needs for education, lifelong learning, workforce development, and digital literacy skills;
  2. establish or enhance electronic and other linkages and improve coordination among and between libraries and entities for the purpose of improving the quality of and access to library and information services;
  3. (a) provide training and professional development, including continuing education, to enhance the skills of the current library workforce and leadership, and advance the delivery of library and information services and (b) enhance efforts to recruit future professionals to the field of library and information services;
  4. develop public and private partnerships with other agencies and community-based organizations;
  5. target library services to individuals of diverse geographic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds, to individuals with disabilities, and to individuals with limited functional literacy or information skills;
  6. target library and information services to persons having difficulty using a library and to underserved urban and rural communities, including children (from birth through age 17) from families with incomes below the poverty line;
  7. develop library services that provide all users access to information through local, state, regional, national, and international collaborations and networks; and carry out other activities consistent with the purposes set forth in section 9121, as described in the State Library Administrative Agency’s plan.
  8. carry out other activities consistent with the purposes set forth in section 9121, as described in the State Library Administrative Agency’s plan.

For the five-year period October 1, 2012, through September 30, 2017, New York will base the goals and activities of its Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) program on recommendations of the 2007-2012 LSTA Evaluation report, results of a 2012 State Library Opinion Survey conducted  through a Gates Foundation project, selected recommendations from Creating the Future:  A 2020 Vision and Plan for Library Service in New York State—Recommendations of the New York State Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to the New York State Board of Regents, Office of Cultural Education strategic priorities, and input from the stakeholder community received during draft review.

2007-12 LSTA Evaluation Report

The 2007-2012 LSTA Evaluation report recommends several existing programs and services to be maintained or further developed through 2017.

  • Continue to support and build new partnerships for NOVELNY and Summer Reading at New York Libraries. The collaborative work with partners and subsequent widespread promotion during the evaluation period greatly expanded these two programs.
  • Foster partnerships at regional and local levels. The LSTA Partnership Survey indicated the great value of library system and local library collaborations with others in carrying out LSTA-funded activities.
  • Seek out grant opportunities, especially for technology and training. Significant work was done during the evaluation period; however, technologies are constantly evolving. Insufficient broadband services also remain in many parts of the state, preventing full access to NOVELNY and other electronic resources provided by libraries.
  • Further the OBE Initiative through continued training, online resources and support. The State Library, library systems and libraries need impact data to show their value and to compete for limited funds in difficult economic times. The incorporation of OBE also strengthens the State Library’s grant applications.
  • Continue to provide Service Improvement Grants to library systems. The programs and services developed met the systems’ unique needs and those of their member libraries and communities. They fostered innovation and better customer service, allowing systems to implement new ideas, methods and technologies.
  • Offer online training to librarians via webinars, teleconferences and videoconferencing. Webinars and teleconferences were consistently used and well-received.
  • Strengthen State Library public education and promotion regarding the value of public library services. The State Library is not alone in experiencing staffing and funding constraints. Many library systems and libraries across New York State are dealing with cuts amidst an economic downturn. In addition, NOVELNY is fully funded through LSTA (New York is one of the few remaining states without state funding for statewide subscriptions to electronic information resources). Informing policymakers of the value of libraries and statewide services such as NOVELNY, providing training to library professionals and trustees and working closely with library advocacy groups are all activities that should be continued and expanded.

2012 State Library Opinion Survey

The 2012 State Library Opinion Survey, part of a multi-state Gates Foundation-supported project, yielded responses from over 700 library and library system staff. The survey confirmed the high value/high use attached to two statewide initiatives: the database project currently known as NOVELNY and Summer Reading at New York Libraries.  Questions about possible new services identified several priorities including:

  • more support for training staff in helping end users with new technologies (including digital literacy),
  • library trustee education,
  • early literacy programs,
  • the extension of the statewide database program to e-books

Regents Advisory Council on Libraries

The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries, created in 1894, advises the New York State Board of Regents and the State Education Department about library-related legislation, policies, staffing, regulations and long-range planning.  In 2010, the Board of Regents challenged the Council to develop and recommend an innovative vision and statewide plan for library services to replace the previous document developed in 2000 by the Regents Commission on Library Services.  The Council appointed a 2020 Vision Planning Taskforce and invited comments from a wide range of stakeholder groups in the library and education communities and from the general public in a series of online surveys. The plan was discussed at open meetings during the annual New York Library Association conferences in 2010 and 2011.  The Council widely disseminated drafts of the 2020 vision and plan recommendations to the library and education communities and to government, business, media, and other statewide organizations.  Over 700 comments from groups and individuals were received and considered during the writing of the report.

The final document, Creating the Future, a 2020 Vision and Plan for Library Services in New York State: Recommendations of the New York State Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to the New York State Board of Regents, was presented to the Board of Regents in April, 2012. The State Library will work in concert with the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to effect implementation of the vision plan over the next eight years.

Creating the Future includes sixty recommendations for creating excellent academic, public, school and special libraries and library services. Recognizing both the possibilities of technology and economic realities in the near future, several “musts” are articulated for all types of libraries. These include: collaboration among libraries and systems to integrate services and collections (especially e-resources) for a better end user experience; achieving operational and cost efficiencies using technological opportunities; and creating partnerships with cultural and educational organizations in the state to offer New Yorkers comprehensive educational opportunities. Creating the Future provides the underpinning for State Library initiatives and guides the goals in this LSTA plan.

STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT

The three documents described under “Needs Assessment” in this plan present the results of information collected from stakeholder responses to surveys, telephone interviews or public meetings.

The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries developed the visionary recommendations of Creating the Future after extensive work with a wide range of stakeholder groups and input from a broad range of constituent groups, including library users.  

The crafting of New York’s fourth Library Services and Technology Act Five-Year Plan involved a large number of stakeholders throughout the process. Initial drafts of the plan were prepared by State Library staff and discussed with members of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries LSTA Committee and with key leaders within the State Education Department. A first draft of the plan was posted on the State Library’s website, and comment invited through messages on NYLINE, New York’s listserv for the library community, and direct messages to leaders of statewide library organizations and potential partner organizations.

In addition to including a wide range of stakeholders during Plan development, the State Library will continue to involve these stakeholders in various aspects of its implementation. For example, expanding and enhancing statewide e-resources and statewide services will require the cooperation and collaboration of many individuals and groups as well as libraries and library systems of all types—e.g., the Executive and the New York State Legislature, other government agencies, educational groups, businesses, the vendor community, and statewide library organizations such as the Library Trustee Association of New York State, the New York Library Association, the New York Alliance of Library Systems and the New York State Higher Education Initiative.

SUMMARY OF GOALS

New York State’s LSTA Five-Year Plan consists of four goals with their program activities, key output targets, and key outcome targets. Each of these goals, listed below, is related to one or more of the recommendations contained in the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries document, an observation from the 2007-12 LSTA Evaluation, or a finding from the 2012 State Library Opinion Survey, and to one or more Library Services and Technology Act priorities.

  1. All New Yorkers will have improved access to library resources that advance and enhance their personal, educational and working lives.
  2. The New York State Library, library systems and libraries will deliver new and improved library programs that anticipate and meet New Yorkers' constantly changing needs for library services.
  3. New Yorkers of all ages will perceive libraries as community learning spaces offering high-quality lifelong learning, literacy, and knowledge creation opportunities that enhance civic engagement and economic vitality.
  4. All New Yorkers will benefit from statewide programs and services of the New York State Library that effectively leverage private and public funding through collaboration and partnerships and maximize value in order to achieve goals one, two and three.

The State Library will carry out the goals of this plan through statewide services and, as funding allows, a grants program. The grant categories and eligibility will be defined in annual grant program guidelines.

GOALS OF THE PLAN: activities, outcomes and outputs

NOTE: All activities in this plan will be carried out over the 2012-2017 period unless otherwise indicated.

Goal 1: All New Yorkers will have improved access to library resources that advance and enhance their personal, educational and working lives.

This goal supports the following:  LSTA priorities 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6.

RAC Recommendations:

The Regents Advisory Council found that providing New Yorkers with equitable access to electronic information resources through libraries continues to be an important priority. They urge all libraries to:

  • Collaborate to integrate services and collections.
  • Function at the front lines of e-resource purchasing, licensing, digital curation and resource sharing.
  • Actively participate in statewide/national initiatives to bring a digital library of shared use, freely accessible books and research materials to all New Yorkers.
  • Collaborate with other libraries in the development of statewide licensing of electronic databases and e-resources of all kinds.
  • Encourage the New York State Library and the state’s library systems to develop statewide delivery infrastructure and to investigate the need for a statewide union catalog.

Program Activities

  • Develop opportunities and partnerships among libraries, library systems, state government, private industry, the nonprofit sector and others to expand statewide access to e-resources for all New Yorkers.
  • Achieve a model of consortial licensing of commercial e-resources with shared cost or tiered pricing among New York State Library, SUNY, CUNY, library systems, state agencies and other partners such as NYLA and NYSHEI.
  • Expand the core collection of commercial e-resources available statewide to include additional library materials for academic research, small business, K-12 education, workforce development and lifelong learning.
  • Partner with vendors and others to explore technology solutions such as geo-location to streamline and enhance remote access to commercial e-resources for all New Yorkers.
  • Participate in regional, state and national initiatives to expand public access through libraries to the digital holdings of New York libraries and other cultural institutions.
  • Partner with vendors and others to provide training for library staff and patrons in accessing and using e-resources.
  • Strengthen partnerships among the State Library, library systems and others to improve the delivery of library materials statewide.
  • Leverage federal E-Rate telecommunications discounts to improve and sustain high-speed broadband connections at libraries and enhance public access computing services for all New Yorkers.
  • Partner with national, state and other government agencies and organizations in cooperative efforts to ensure that every library in New York State obtains and sustains robust high-speed broadband connections and Internet access.
  • Develop opportunities for more libraries to offer virtual meetings, distance education and other technology-based applications for the public.
  • Partner with library systems and others to ensure that all New Yorkers have access to a local public library.

Key Output Targets

  • By 2017, 500 libraries and library systems in New York State will use preferential pricing negotiated under terms of a new model for statewide access.
  • At least 5,000 library staff and end-users will participate in e-resources training between 2012 and 2017.
  • By 2017, 20% of public library outlets will have virtual meetings, distance education and other technology-based applications available to the public.
  • Sixty million searches will be conducted in 2017 in databases delivered to New Yorkers through statewide licenses.
  • An average of 350 libraries and library systems per year will receive E-rate discounts between 2012 and 2017.
  • By 2017 the State Library website will demonstrate a 10% increase in use from 2012.

Key Outcome Targets

  • By 2014, at least 50 percent of library and library system staff who have attended a training session on products of the statewide database program will indicate in focus groups, surveys, or interviews that they feel confident in promoting and facilitating use of these resources.
  • By 2017, an additional 100,000 formerly unserved New Yorkers will benefit from having a local library in their community.
  • By 2016, 30 per cent of libraries receiving E-rate discounts will report via survey that E-rate discounts enable them to offer services valued by their end users.
  • By 2017, 80 percent of New Yorkers replying to a survey will report benefiting from use of an e-resource through a library.

Goal 2: The New York State Library, library systems and libraries will deliver new and improved library programs that anticipate and meet New Yorkers' constantly changing needs for library services.

This goal supports the following:  LSTA priorities: 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.

RAC Recommendations:

  • Create incentives for collaboration, innovation, and shared services among systems.
  • Expand the existing Commissioner’s Regulations, Section 91.2, to require an elementary school librarian in every school to strengthen instructional leadership in meeting the P-12 Common Core Learning Standards, and enforce library staffing regulations in all public schools.
  • Collaborate to integrate services and collections of all types of libraries while developing a transparent and seamless world of library services that are ubiquitous and instantaneous yet personalized and flexible, serving all ages and needs.
  • Innovation in the creation of new services such as the deployment of systems for intelligent processing and correlation of large data sets.
  • Collaboration with other libraries and community organizations to develop seamless information literacy initiatives, promote cultural understanding and protect local historical and cultural treasures.
  • The collaborative development of consistent, cost-effective digital preservation strategies.
  • Library systems—as with all libraries—to anticipate and develop innovative and entrepreneurial services; and to discontinue out-of-date services when they no longer provide benefit to their members or the end-users.
  • Public Library Systems to proactively encourage and assist their member libraries that are eligible to pursue the Regents’ Public Library District model of public governance and support.
  • Continuously review and update outdated standards and guidelines.
  • Mandate public library trustee education similar to that required of School Boards.
  • Encourage and reward best practices throughout the state.

Program Activities

  • Strengthen partnerships among the State Library, library systems and others to educate library staff, library trustees and others about innovative models of public library governance, program delivery and support.
  • Support, encourage and expand innovative library programs, improved services and effective evaluation processes in libraries and library systems by providing a range of advisory services to help library staff use performance (outputs) and results (outcomes) in measuring progress toward excellence and community impact.
  • Enhance national, state and regional communications about the innovative and exemplary library programs and best practices of New York’s libraries and library systems.
  • Strengthen partnerships among the State Library, library systems, libraries, IMLS and others to provide user-friendly, timely, and accurate data via the Internet for the ongoing evaluation and continuous improvement of library services and programs.
  • Strengthen partnerships among the State Library, the State Education Department’s Office of P-12, school library systems, and others to improve, enhance and sustain programs and services of New York’s school libraries.
  • Strengthen partnerships among the State Library, the State Education Department’s Office of Higher Education, reference and research library resources systems and academic and special libraries (both statewide and nationally), and others to improve, enhance and sustain programs and services of  New York’s academic and special libraries.
  • Strengthen partnerships among the State Library, the State Education Department’s Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services, public library systems and public libraries and others to improve, enhance and sustain workforce development, lifelong learning and literacy programs and services of New York’s public libraries.
  • Expand and sustain conservation/preservation program activities in New York’s libraries, including technological solutions.
  • Strengthen partnerships with federal, state and regional organizations to assist libraries in developing continuity of services and disaster recovery strategy plans

Key Output Targets

  • Fifteen public library districts will be established between 2012 and 2017.
  • Seventy-five percent of State Library librarians will complete at least twelve hours of work-related training annually.
  • By 2017, the number of libraries with disaster recovery plans will increase from 47% (based on 2009 survey results) to 60%.
  • By 2017, the number of participants contributing to the dark archive for audio digitization projects maintained by the State Library will increase by 5 percent.

Key Outcome Targets

By 2015, 60 percent of library and library system staff and library trustees will indicate through surveys that they are better able to anticipate and meet changing customer needs and better able to measure their progress toward achieving service excellence as a result of training provided by the State Library and its partners.

Goal 3: New Yorkers of all ages will perceive libraries as community learning spaces offering high-quality lifelong learning, literacy, and knowledge creation opportunities that enhance civic engagement and economic vitality.

This goal supports the following:  LSTA priorities: 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6.

RAC Recommendations:

  • Create incentives for school libraries to collaborate with other libraries and communities (such as public libraries, university and community college libraries) to result in full-time, full-year access to information that will further opportunities for all students.
  • The continuation and strengthening of collaborations with other communities in support of life-long learning, information literacy and research.
  • Advancement of the primary role of academic librarians in fostering the integration of information literacy competencies into teaching and learning on their campuses to support student academic achievement and to prepare students for the global information economy that will shape their professional and personal lives.
  • Support state and national digital literacy learning initiatives providing this 21st century skill to people of all walks of life, not just those enrolled in schools and colleges.
  • The provision of robust early childhood education programs and the provision of homework assistance as a core service; the alignment of outreach services with societal priorities, such as teen services and gang prevention.
  • The provision of full access to library services by people with disabilities, including accessible buildings, homebound services, and assistive technology.
  • Investment in public library facilities in order to be able to respond to the changing needs of communities.
  • All public libraries to proactively create and collect local content and serve as a catalyst for civic engagement to promote civil discourse and confront society’s most difficult problems.

Program Activities

  • Partner with public library systems and other organizations to periodically assess public library needs for building construction, expansion, and renovation.
  • Partner with national, state, regional and local organizations to ensure that library staff, trustees and patrons have ongoing access to high-quality digital literacy training programs.
  • Partner with library systems and others to ensure that all library staff and trustees are highly-skilled in using new technologies.
  • Support and encourage libraries to offer a broad range of community learning opportunities for all ages that support literacy, workforce development, civic engagement and economic vitality.
  • Expand partnerships among national, state, regional and local organizations to increase participation in and awareness of “Summer Reading at New York Libraries.”
  • Incorporate the use of library e-resources into summer reading program materials, activities and promotion.
  • Strengthen partnerships that enable public libraries to assist young families and child care providers in fostering early literacy skills for all children in New York State.
    • Connect local libraries with statewide networks of childcare providers, non-profit organizations, public broadcasters and others to enhance early childhood services, including parent education (see Goal 4).
    • Provide library staff with ongoing access to research-based early literacy skills training.
    • Partner with national, state, regional and local organizations to increase family and caregiver participation in library-based early literacy programs that foster a literacy-rich home environment.
  • Strengthen partnerships among the New York State Council for the Humanities, the State Library, library systems, libraries and others to enable more public libraries to offer early literacy/family reading program in their communities.
  • Strengthen partnerships among the State Library, the library systems and local libraries to increase both awareness and use of the digital talking book program offered through The New York Public Library’s Andrew Heiskell Talking Book Library and the New York State Library’s Talking Book and Braille Library. 
  • Enhance local library programming through partnerships among libraries, library systems, historical records repositories, the State Library, State Archives, State Museum and the Office of Public Broadcasting, and other national and state organizations that will provide libraries with timely, free access to New York State themed traveling exhibits, selected exhibit materials and related online resources.

Key Output Targets

  • By 2017, eighty percent of the P-12 schools in New York State will have collaborated with one or more public libraries in promoting student participation in Summer Reading at New York Libraries.
  • Summer Reading at New York Libraries will report an annual participation level of 1.8 million children and teens by 2017.
  • By 2017, the number of public libraries offering early literacy programs will increase by 20 percent.
  • By 2017, the number of public libraries involved in local collaborations to enhance early childhood health and school readiness will increase by 20 percent.
  • By 2017 the number of public libraries offering adult literacy and/or English as a Second Language (ESL) programs will increase by 25 percent.
  • Thirty three percent of registered TBBL customers will use the digital talking book program (BARD service) by 2017.
  • A minimum of 1,200 library staff will be trained to deliver digital literacy services to library users.
  • By 2017, 75 percent of public libraries will have staff skilled in provision of early literacy services.
  • By 2017, 30 percent of libraries will use online or traveling exhibits provided by the State Library.

Key Outcome Targets

  • School leaders will indicate that students have benefited through participation in Summer Reading at New York Libraries as reported by a sampling of school leaders through qualitative surveys conducted annually at selected schools.
  • By 2017, 75% of public library and library system staff will indicate through surveys that they are better equipped to provide strong summer reading programs for their communities and that they use materials provided by the New York State Library for this purpose.
  • 30 percent of childcare providers participating in the QUALITYstarsNY childcare rating and improvement system will work with public libraries to support and enhance their early learning programs.
  • People using public libraries will benefit from expert staff trained in delivering digital literacy services as reported by a sample of users through qualitative surveys conducted annually from 2014 to 2016 at selected public libraries.

Goal 4: All New Yorkers will benefit from statewide programs and services of the New York State Library that effectively leverage private and public funding through collaboration and partnerships and maximize value in order to achieve goals one, two and three.

This goal supports the following:  LSTA priorities: 1, 2, 4 and 7.

RAC Recommendations:

  • Create collaborative partnerships with all cultural and educational organizations in the state to offer residents the most comprehensive educational opportunities available anywhere in the world.
  • [State Library] to provide clear and relevant standards, guidelines and regulations designed to improve library services.
  • Library systems to consider restructuring their governance and initiating partnerships for greater collaboration at the regional and state level; up to and including consolidation.
  • Collaborate to integrate services and collections of all types of libraries while developing a transparent and seamless world of library services that are ubiquitous and instantaneous yet personalized and flexible, serving all ages and needs.

Program Activities

  • Increase the visibility of the statewide programs and services of the State Library available to New Yorkers.
  • Regularly share information concerning the impact of LSTA federal funds with the library community and the general public.
  • Seek public and private partners in the implementation of the activities identified within this five year plan.
  • Use new communications technologies to provide leadership, technical assistance, advisory services and professional development more effectively to libraries and library systems.
  • Identify and facilitate opportunities for libraries, library systems and the State Library to leverage additional public and private support that will improve library programs and services available to New Yorkers.
  • Provide grants to library systems and libraries, as funds are available, to enable libraries to   improve access, deliver innovative programs and offer high-quality lifelong learning, literacy and knowledge creation opportunities that enhance civic engagement and economic vitality.
  • Revise State Education Department policies, regulations and program guidelines as needed to keep pace with change and to implement this five year plan.
  • Continuously improve online planning, budgetary, and reporting tools for use by the State Library and by local libraries and systems.
  • Participate in national, state and regional partnerships that promote collaborative collection development, access to resource sharing, and sustaining information in all formats.
  • Build capacity to enhance early childhood outcomes by partnering with statewide early childhood networks including (but not limited to) the NYS Early Childhood Advisory Council; the Early Care and Learning Council and its network of childcare resource and referral agencies; United Way of NYS and its local United Ways; public television stations; and early childhood teacher preparation programs.
  • Partner with the State Archives, the State Museum, the Office of Public Broadcasting and Educational Television, and others to provide seamless access for New Yorkers to the holdings of State Education Department research collections.
  • Expand use of State Library resources onsite, through email and through interlibrary loan by providing timely access to requested copies of materials and information from State Library collections.
  • Expand online services for interlibrary loans by investigating State Library partnerships with existing resource sharing platforms similar to IDS-Information Delivery Services (such as Connect NY and SUNYConnect).
  • Partner with national, state and local organizations to improve statewide access to full-text electronic federal and New York State government documents.
  • Expand access to information provided by the State Library both onsite and through the library’s website, including information about State Library collections and statewide programs and services.
  • Promote user self-service or non-intermediated access to State Library collections using enabling technologies.
  • Participate with the State Education Department Office of Educational Design and Technology in the implementation of the University of the State of New York (USNY) Statewide Learning Technology Plan
  • Work with public and private entities to ensure that New York’s libraries obtain and sustain robust high-speed broadband connections through increased use of partnerships, E-rate telecommunications discounts and other mechanisms.

Key Output Targets

  • The State Library will demonstrate an annual increase of 5 percent in use of Research Library services from 2012 to 2017.
  • By 2017, the State Library will create a repository for state agencies to use in self publishing agency documents; 20% of agencies will use this service.
  • The State Library will display information about LSTA-supported activities at 25 meetings or public events by 2017.
  • The State Library will provide electronic metadata for three “hidden collections” by 2017.
  • Twenty five new finding aids or collection guides and thirty new or revised pages to Research Library collections will be made available online annually during the period 2012-2017.
  • The number of hits pertaining to LSTA-supported activities on the New York State Library website will increase 10 percent each year over 2012 levels.
  • The State Library will participate in at least three collaborative resource-sharing projects by 2017.
  • The State Library will facilitate two community partnerships to support early childhood education.
  • State Library staff will provide at least 25 public classes or programs annually from 2012-17.

Key Outcome Targets

  • By 2017, 40% of people responding to web-based or onsite surveys will report benefiting from information obtained from State Library collections or services.
  • By 2017, the number of public libraries involved in local collaborations to enhance early childhood health and school readiness will increase by 20 percent.

Communications and Public Availability

After this plan has been approved by IMLS, it will be published on the New York State Library website and will be available on the website throughout the term of the Five-Year Plan.

The State Library is aware of a need to communicate clearly to the library community the rationale for the content of the new Five-Year Plan and for any annual Grant Program Guidelines. Greater use of new technologies will be explored to assure broader and timelier coverage of issues related to the Library Services and Technology Act program within the library community.

The State Library has informed the library community that the plan may be amended annually As the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries and the State Library begin work on implementation of Creating the Future, new activities and measures may appropriately refine and advance those named in this plan. In addition, the State Library will work closely with the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries and other specific groups within the library community to discuss the LSTA Plan’s implementation, to develop grant program guidelines, and to manage other important issues relating to the LSTA program.

Evaluation Plan and Monitoring Procedures

The State Library will continue to sharpen its focus on evaluation and will incorporate outcome-based evaluation (1) within its own operations and its statewide services to libraries and library systems and (2) within the projects supported by Library Service and Technology Act funding.

To measure the progress of statewide service activities, the State Library will use a variety of measures to collect both quantitative and qualitative data, such as web-based surveys and focus groups. In presenting each of its four goals, this Five-Year Plan notes specific evaluation measures, along with the anticipated outputs and outcomes. State Library staff will track outputs and outcomes annually, as appropriate. Data driven assessments will be conducted annually or as significant activities proceed.

Over the course of the 2012–2017 LSTA Five-Year Plan, the State Library will continue a training program for State Library and library system staff to assist them in using performance (outputs) and results (outcomes) measures in their progress towards excellence. Applicants for LSTA-supported sub-grants will be encouraged to frame their applications to include outputs and outcomes in their applications and report on the results at the end of the project.

The State Library will assign staff to track implementation of the Five-Year Plan, prepare reports as required, and monitor any sub-grantee projects funded under an LSTA grants program. Library Development staff who have consulting and liaison roles will make as many onsite visits as possible. Reports are required from each sub-grantee, and these reports will be a part of the monitoring procedure.

Last Updated: September 21, 2012