IMLS New York State Program Report Summary Fiscal Year 2009

Submitted by the New York State Library December 2010

Version: 2 Allotment: $9,233,751
Total Projects: 64 Total LSTA Funds Expended: $9,233,751

Project # / %
LSTA Funds $ / %
Statewide 8 / 13% $8,040,544 / 87%
Partnership 4 / 6% $1,620,588 / 18%
Exemplary 8 / 13% $74,195 / 1%
OBE-Related 0 / 0% $0 / 0%

Section 1 | Grant Award Summary

Public Library Grants
Number of Libraries Submitting: 23 Total Libraries Receiving Grants: 23
Number of Applications: 45 Total Number of Grants Funded: 45
Total Requested: $465,156 Total Awarded: $465,156
 
Parent Libraries Receiving Grants: 0 Child Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Parent Number of Grants Funded: 0 Child Number of Grants Funded: 0
    Parent/Child Total Awarded: $0
 
Single Libraries Receiving Grants: 23    
Single Number of Grants Funded: 45    
Single Total Awarded: $465,156    
 
School Library Grants
Number of Libraries Submitting: 1 Total Libraries Receiving Grants: 1
Number of Applications: 1 Total Number of Grants Funded: 1
Total Requested: $150,000 Total Awarded: $150,000
 
Parent Libraries Receiving Grants: 0 Child Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Parent Number of Grants Funded: 0 Child Number of Grants Funded: 0
    Parent/Child Total Awarded: $0
 
Single Libraries Receiving Grants: 1    
Single Number of Grants Funded: 1    
Single Total Awarded: $150,000    
 
Academic Library Grants
Number of Libraries Submitting: 0 Total Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Number of Applications: 0 Total Number of Grants Funded: 0
Total Requested: $0 Total Awarded: $0
 
Parent Libraries Receiving Grants: 0 Child Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Parent Number of Grants Funded: 0 Child Number of Grants Funded: 0
    Parent/Child Total Awarded: $0
 
Single Libraries Receiving Grants: 0    
Single Number of Grants Funded: 0    
Single Total Awarded: $0    
 
Special Library Grants
Number of Libraries Submitting: 0 Total Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Number of Applications: 0 Total Number of Grants Funded: 0
Total Requested: $0 Total Awarded: $0
 
Parent Libraries Receiving Grants: 0 Child Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Parent Number of Grants Funded: 0 Child Number of Grants Funded: 0
    Parent/Child Total Awarded: $0
 
Single Libraries Receiving Grants: 0    
Single Number of Grants Funded: 0    
Single Total Awarded: $0    
 
Multi-Type Library Grants
Number of Libraries Submitting: 9 Total Libraries Receiving Grants: 9
Number of Applications: 9 Total Number of Grants Funded: 9
Total Requested: $100,000 Total Awarded: $100,000
 
Parent Libraries Receiving Grants: 0 Child Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Parent Number of Grants Funded: 0 Child Number of Grants Funded: 0
    Parent/Child Total Awarded: $0
 
Single Libraries Receiving Grants: 9    
Single Number of Grants Funded: 9    
Single Total Awarded: $100,000    
 
SLAA Library Grants
Number of Libraries Submitting: 1 Total Libraries Receiving Grants: 1
Number of Applications: 9 Total Number of Grants Funded: 9
Total Requested: $8,518,595 Total Awarded: $8,518,595
 
Parent Libraries Receiving Grants: 0 Child Libraries Receiving Grants: 0
Parent Number of Grants Funded: 0 Child Number of Grants Funded: 0
    Parent/Child Total Awarded: $0
 
Single Libraries Receiving Grants: 1    
Single Number of Grants Funded: 9    
Single Total Awarded: $8,518,595    
 

Section 2 | OBE Summary

Q1: What progress did you make in implementing OBE during this reporting period?

OBE is not a major goal of the New York State Library’s current Five-Year LSTA Plan: 2007-2012. This reporting section is not completed per instructions from the State Library’s IMLS liaison. 
 
Q2: Briefly describe your state's results in meeting its identified OBE goal(s) this reporting period.

 

Section 3 | Project Reports

Project Code: 2009-NY-34632
Project Title: Project Number:
24/7 Online Reference 0070-10-0018
Library Name: Project Director:
Ramapo Catskill Library System Robert Hubsher
Phone Number: Email:
845-343-1131 rhubsher@rcls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$11,055 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$19,587 $30,642
Number of Persons Served:
18,600
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Children, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services Information & referral (I&R), Reference services
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The 24/7 Online Reference project extended library services to a diverse public in the Ramapo Catskill Library System (RCLS), where many residents find it difficult to visit libraries during normal business hours or find it easier to use online support to communicate with reference personnel. This project provided services around the clock, seven days a week, to all patrons served by the library system.
Project Activities/Methods:
The Ramapo Catskill Library System implemented the program using the policies and reference interview scripts supporting the online reference software developed by OCLC, known as QuestionPoint. RCLS participated in the consortium of New York libraries using the "Ask Us 24 x 7" tag, providing online virtual reference to supplement the capacity of system personnel in providing after-hours services to patrons. Many promotional displays, bookmarks and posters helped build awareness for this program.
Project Outputs:
In one year, the new 24/7 reference service experienced a three-fold increase in users. A total of 65% of the 2,237 patrons served were from within the RCLS system. The web interface for the service was prominently displayed in conjunction with the 24/7 graphic on the RCLS and member libraries websites. The library system monitored users’ satisfaction through analysis of the archived chat sessions, allowing the system to improve reference interview scripts and approaches to working with patrons over the Internet.
Project Outcomes:
Providing accessible virtual reference around the clock added information referral expertise to the 47-member libraries and to patrons throughout the library system, strengthening the public’s access to library services throughout the region. RCLS’s participation in other regional New York consortiums helped sustain the growth of this service and contributed to the pool of staff share available for virtual reference coverage regionally and throughout the state. In partnership with OCLC and QuestionPoint, technology to support this initiative has been consistently refined through increased library participation and user feedback by librarians using these service platforms.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:
This is a very rural area of the state, where library patrons are challenged in getting to their libraries for reference services and this project is very much needed. The project’s partnership with other regional virtual reference consortiums is a model for other New York public library systems.

Project Code: 2009-NY-34599
Project Title: Project Number:
A New Beginning: Finding the Right Job for You 0070-10-0016
Library Name: Project Director:
Pioneer Library System Kimberly A. Iraci
Phone Number: Email:
585-394-8260 kiraci@pls-net.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$2,504 $9,869
Number of Persons Served:
8,933
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers, People with special needs  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Economic Development, Outreach Services, Training for the Public Job and career services
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary?green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Collaboration between libraries and employment programs produced a joint partnership providing career workshops for displaced workers. Job skills development through career workshops were held at several library sites in a four-county service area in Western New York State. Project workshops concentrating on four topics were delivered: Career and Skills Assessment, Activating a Job Search, Developing a Winning Resume, and Interviewing and Beyond.
Project Activities/Methods:
The target audience for career programs were participants aged 50 and above, who were displaced due to plant closings regionally, and those with learning and reading disabilities. Libraries partnered with local Department of Labor programs through One-Stop Career Centers to help patrons use additional career services and resources. Cross-agency cooperation helped spur the project through referrals and information sharing. One-on-one assistance in small group workshops afforded job coaching opportunities and a high degree of networking between facilitators and attendees. The customized program allowed students feedback from library facilitators on resumes, letter preparation, and avenues for job search that participants could incorporate into their active employment applications. The project launched a web page (www.owwl.org/outreach/jobs.), and new career titles were also added to the collection.
Project Outputs:
While the program focused its goals on the unemployed in small group training sessions, the use of resources made available through the website demonstrated the value of the coordinated web resources patrons could access as a result of the grant. Among all the web pages (119,331) available to patrons, the jobs pages consistently ranked in the top five or six of all page views for the library system’s website. Additionally, the availability and promotion of job materials resulted in an increase in circulation of career resources of 11% from the previous year. The Pioneer Library System developed a resource page for area job seekers with listings by county available at http://owwl.org/outreach/jobs.html.
Project Outcomes:
The project has demonstrated libraries’ ability to connect job seekers with resources, referrals, and the tools to overcome the barriers of the digital divide through computer skills and searching skills classes, as well as other career-building support services for the job seeker. New partnerships with community agencies provided greater coordination of services with Department of Labor and One Stop Career Centers. Patrons utilized the libraries to build and extend their information networks with job placement services, workshop participants and library facilitators, to become more competent job seekers using 21st Century skills, in turn becoming more viable job candidates in the global marketplace.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Participant comment "Thank You so very much for the classes sponsored by the Library System at Wadsworth Library in Geneseo. The classes were perfect, the instructor excellent and the group fun to work with."
Exemplary Reason:
"A New Beginning: Finding the Right Job for You" is a project that partners with community Department of Labor services to bring much needed workforce development services to library users.

Project Code: 2009-NY-34568
Project Title: Project Number:
ABC--Read to Me: Reaching City Babies and Toddlers 0070-10-0013
Library Name: Project Director:
New York Public Library H. Jack Martin
Phone Number: Email:
212-592-7421 hjmartin@nypl.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$21,400 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$34,018 $55,418
Number of Persons Served:
20,949
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Strengthen families and children Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Pre-school children, Urban populations  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Literacy Programs, Outreach Services Family literacy
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?green check mark
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Recognizing the impact of pre-school literacy programs contributing to school success, the New York Public Library (NYPL) created a program focusing on emergent literacy and language development at member libraries. The project supported greater reading readiness through lapsit programs designed for children from birth to 24 months of age and their caregivers or parents. This outreach program also targeted underserved populations including teens, single parents, immigrant parents, and caregivers. By partnering with New York City human service organizations, NYPL also initiated early literacy parenting skills through presentations and early childhood educational programs.
Project Activities/Methods:
The program included a series of special staff training programs and planning sessions scheduled at 15 targeted branch libraries in the boroughs of the Bronx, Staten Island and Manhattan. A collection of new board books, music resources and story puppets were purchased to support the initiative, with approximately 61 titles provided for each of fifteen participating branch libraries. A quarterly program calendar "Roar" was developed to help promote the story and lapsit programs for babies and toddlers. A staff workshop was presented on leading music and movement with babies, preschoolers, and toddlers during library programs. Staff training about working with teenage parents was held at the Harlem Children’s Zone. Evaluations of the staff programs were conducted following each presentation.
Project Outputs:
In addition to program events and staff training, NYPL established outreach to many young teenage adults through the LYFE Program (Living for the Young Family through Education) to further emphasize the importance of early childhood literacy and parent/caregiver literacy. NYPL offered 13 programs at high schools in Manhattan and the Bronx. A survey tool for caregivers emphasizing the importance of reading and speech in the language development of babies and toddlers was developed and translated into Spanish for use at all branch libraries. A total of 589 lapsit programs were held for 20,845 caregivers and toddlers; 59 librarians and staff working with young children were trained through the program. In a survey of patrons, all 238 respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the lapsit program played an important role in helping young children develop a love of reading.
Project Outcomes:
The Read to Me program provided model learning programs and strategies for caregivers to help them address the importance of early childhood language learning and pre-reading readiness through library programs. Through outreach to special populations, NYPL supported family and literacy programming through community anchor and human service organizations, building a greater awareness of the pivotal role libraries can have in lifelong learning and literacy for children and caregivers.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
The Project LYFE component of the ABC--Read to Me project worked with a core group of ten mothers, who became extremely motivated about reading to their children as a result of the program. The mothers gained new insight on child behavior and attentiveness, learning that toddlers and babies can be extremely active and curious during the reading programs, while still gaining pre-reading skills, such as learning rhymes and songs from familiar children’s poems and fairytales.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-37161
Project Title: Project Number:
Advancing Technology
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Mary Linda Todd
Phone Number: Email:
518-486-4858 mtodd@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$534,794 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $534,794
Number of Persons Served:
7,312,626
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training Technical skills
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?green check mark
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The New York State Library provided state-level leadership, planning, coordination, consultation, and support services to enable library systems and libraries to utilize current and new technology.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library worked with the library community, the Gates Foundation, the Governor’s Office for Technology, the New York State Broadband Council, the United States Department of Commerce and other partners to ensure that libraries had the technological resources and staffing capacity to serve their users in the current electronic environment and into the future. This included, but was not limited to: 1. Assisting library systems and libraries to fully participate in the Gates Online Hardware Opportunity program and the Online Broadband Opportunity program. 2. Assisting library systems and public libraries to fully participate in the national E-Rate Program. 3. Assisting library systems and libraries to fully participate in the national Broadband Technology Opportunity Program offered by the NTIA. 4. Assisting libraries to participate in state-funded broadband grants supported by the Governor’s Office for Technology. 5. Providing a comprehensive library data collection and dissemination program using web 2.0, GIS and other online technologies to make information about library services and programs broadly accessible to the library community and the public. 6. Partnering with library leaders to upgrade NOVELNY-Ready Library criteria and tracking the progress of New York’s 6,300 member libraries of library systems in their efforts to become NOVELNY-Ready. 7. Partnering with library systems and others to significantly improve broadband access and connectivity speeds for the public.
Project Outputs:
The State Library continues to assist in advancing the use of new technologies for libraries and the public by supporting the delivery of technology training and the upgrading and installation of public access computing hardware across the state in partnership with the Gates Library Foundation, the library systems and other organizations. Highlights include providing leadership, coordination and ongoing support for the multiyear Gates Online Hardware Opportunity Grant program on which the State Library staff began intensive work starting in January 2008. This two-year program was completed in early 2010. It brought over $6 million in private and public funds to New York State for public access computing and reached 421 public libraries, installing over 3,200 computers and peripherals. The State Library produced a final impact report: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/gateslib/hardware/impactreport.pdf In Fall 2008, the State Library began work on the Gates Online Broadband Opportunity Program which resulted in a highly successful statewide broadband summit attended by over 300 library leaders and community influencers in June 2009. State Library leadership resulted in a Gates grant award of $947,517 for a two-year statewide broadband grant beginning in November 2009. This new grant is well underway and is improving and sustaining broadband connectivity to at least 1.5 mbps for some 65 libraries and 10 library systems. http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/gateslib/broadbnd/ The State Library also received a Department of Commerce NTIA BTOP grant award in early 2010. Federal stimulus funding of $9.521 million and $5.4 million in matching funds will create public access computer centers in 30 public libraries and 5 E-mobile computer training units http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/nybbexpress/index.html . This project will enable public libraries to extend hours, upgrade connectivity, add more than 800 new public computer workstations, and provide access to 24/7 job search resources in 41 economically distressed upstate New York counties. This project is well underway and will be completed in early 2013. In April 2008, the State Library released revised, more challenging technology criteria for NOVELNY-ready libraries that were developed in partnership with the library community (http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/nvlready/levels.htm ) As of July 2010, 78 percent of New York’s 6,300 libraries are now NOVELNY-Ready libraries. Another was State Library use of technology to support the delivery of six College of DuPage statewide teleconferences to more than 1,220 attendees. With assistance and support from the New York State Library, 344 libraries and library systems have thus far received 2009 E-Rate discounts totaling over $11.5 million. The State Library continued to make creative use of web technologies. Library Development’s robust websites focused on statewide services and programs exceeded 5 million hits this past year. The State Library also made increased use of online technologies to collect and disseminate data about library and library system services and programs. Over 1,000 entities made use of these online data systems for data collection, reporting and dissemination purposes. Some 2,239 users accessed the Bibliostat Connect online product. The State Library also uses GIS technologies to provide detailed information about public libraries and the communities they serve (http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/libs/pldtools/plsmaps/index.html#system ). Staff continued implementing the statewide outcomes based evaluation (OBE) training plan developed with assistance from IMLS with a particular focus on using OBE to evaluate technology projects. From 2009 through 2010, 27 additional people received OBE training. In August 2010 the State Library held an OBE webinar which is now posted on the State Library’s website http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/obe/webinar/obepresentation.htm .
Project Outcomes:
Other Results:
Overall, State Library staff made 84 technology-related site visits, sponsored 20 events attended by 1,490 people, and managed 522 technology grants.
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34518
Project Title: Project Number:
Awesome Customer Service! Beyond a Smile and a Date Due Slip 0070-10-0009
Library Name: Project Director:
Finger Lakes Library System Marisa Iacobucci
Phone Number: Email:
607-273-4074 marisa@flls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$2,352 $9,717
Number of Persons Served:
230
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 4. Strengthen Public Support for Improved NY Library Service
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
In Year 2 of this project, workshops on innovative service were offered for all Finger Lake Library System members to help librarians understand their role in providing exemplary services, including technology services, to patrons. A coaching for performance model was adopted for the training, as well as open-ended conversation simulating the reference interview.
Project Activities/Methods:
A series of topical training sessions were held to help staff overcome traditional boundaries and perceptions in working with select populations. Staff from adjacent library systems also took advantage of the training opportunity. The programs centered on learning to support special populations, teens, and other "difficult patrons" and respond to their needs. The sessions encouraged interactive role-play and challenged staff to overcome past behaviors that were not focused on the patron. The sessions were entitled Coaching for Performance, Reinventing the Customer-Centered Library, Close Encounters with Those People, and Breaking All the Rules.
Project Outputs:
Four training sessions were held in Year 2 with a total attendance of 106 library system staff. The different presenters supported the idea of working to establish more trust with sectors of the patron population.
Project Outcomes:
Participants in all four workshops expressed their ability to communicate more purposefully and compassionately in response to patron inquiries, using several communication strategies to stimulate a better dialog with a consumer. Making patron-friendly decisions supports a more interactive environment, in which patron needs are more clearly expressed and realized. Building a bridge for working with special populations increased library utilization by "reluctant" library groups and patrons.
Other Results:
More friendly signage, the elimination of fines, and the investigation of book requests in a timely fashion were some of the results realized from the workshops.
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34860
Project Title: Project Number:
Brooklyn Public Library 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant Program 0070-09-1019
Library Name: Project Director:
Brooklyn Public Library Andrea Vaughn
Phone Number: Email:
718-230-2168 a.vaughn@brooklynpubliclibrary.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $150,000
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$321,594 $483,594
Number of Persons Served:
121,129
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens, Literacy Programs, Outreach Services Reading development, Reading readiness, Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
In this summer reading initiative, Brooklyn Public Library developed a robust program for a diverse audience to nurture a lifelong love of reading that reached out to both children and families using the BeCreative@Your Library Summer Reading theme.
Project Activities/Methods:
The program used diverse methods at different library branches to encourage participation by different age groups. It included the creation of artwork in the form of murals, quilts and quilt squares based on readings suitable for younger children, and the inter-branch exchange of postcards to be exhibited and read in other branch libraries. The postcards depicted drawings created by children and teens on characters they have come to know through their Summer Reading Program. A greeting explaining the story action was included in the message.
Project Outputs:
The highly attended workshops for branch "mural-making" and "quilt-making" were conducted throughout the library system, attended by 4,104 children and families. Thirty libraries participated in the quilt-making component of the Brooklyn summer reading initiative, and sixty library locations participated in the creation of the murals for the Summer Reading Program. Completed murals were displayed at each Brooklyn Public Library. A total of 564 participants from thirty libraries participated in the third summer reading component: mail art exchange.
Project Outcomes:
The cross fertilization of creative endeavor in the arts with literacy activities through the summer reading program increased participation in the program, as evidenced by "new" signups for other workshops in addition to the summer reading book program. A total of 72.2% of summer readers polled on the Brooklyn reading program website said their summer reading "got better".
Other Results:
Combining art-making and dance-making using the story of Grimm’s Twelve Dancing Princesses and Leo Lionni’s story, Little Blue and Little Yellow, was very popular. These efforts paired library and museum staff in the realms of creative experience as part of summer reading activities. Impromptu discussions about characters, books and reading also took place during the quilt-making classes, where students shared their enthusiasm for the books and characters they tried to represent in their artwork.
Anecdotal Info:
Another creative endeavor at one Brooklyn Library Summer Reading Program involved the use of magnetic words to create individual poems. Teens and children participated in group creation of poems, using creative word combinations and language skills. Creative recitation or read-aloud activities involved different age groups.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34866
Project Title: Project Number:
Buffalo & Erie County 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant Program 0070-09-1002
Library Name: Project Director:
Buffalo and Erie County Public Library System Kathleen J. Goodrich
Phone Number: Email:
716-858-7180 goodrichK@buffalolib.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$76,830 $88,830
Number of Persons Served:
31,577
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens, Literacy Programs Reading development, Reading readiness, Summer reading programs, Family literacy
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Buffalo area summer reading program combined reading reinforcement and participation in library activities to promote a love of reading and increase library utilization. Additionally, librarians embraced arts and cultural performance programs to enrich reading enjoyment.
Project Activities/Methods:
Librarians and staff at the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library (BECPL) utilized the two theme-based summer reading programs for the children and teen components of their programs. Additionally, teams of children at 23 libraries within the system participated in the 11th Annual Battle of the Book Competition. Various performers reinforced the "Be Creative" theme, visiting libraries throughout the system over the summer months, increasing the opportunity for cultural diversity and family or intergenerational activities around literacy themes. Craft supplies for various reinforcement activities were purchased through the grant. The program was promoted through newspapers, school visits, the system website and through flyers, posters and bookmarks. Reading logs were distributed to students to complete and return to the libraries at the completion of the summer reading program.
Project Outputs:
Attendance at the summer reading programs topped 30,000, and 350 children worked in teams at 23 libraries as part of the Battle of the Book Competition, concentrating on book facts, trivia, and competitions to craft bookmarks and graphic novels in various age categories. Children were also encouraged to develop online book reviews and add book comments. A total of 987 separate library programs were offered to children, with total attendance of 28,425. In addition, 263 teen programs were held, with total attendance of 3,117. Children reported reading 6,345 books. Teens reported reading 1,122 books. Newspaper, website and in-house posters helped to promote the program and three websites were developed to support the program.
Project Outcomes:
Summer reading in libraries throughout the BECPL benefited from a blend of literacy activities reinforced by performance arts. Integrating highly useful web-based resources with the creative activities as suggested in the Summer Reading Collaborative’s Handbook provided member libraries throughout the Buffalo region with rich resources for children and teen participation in the program, as evidenced through the bookmark and web commentaries produced by participants of the summer reading program.
Other Results:
The Buffalo and Erie County Public Library reported that the content of the Collaborative Handbook was used in many programs, and the librarians loved the suggested activities.
Anecdotal Info:
A therapy dog named Dora was used as a receptive reading listener as children tested their reading skills and overcame their shyness or fear of dogs. The community experience with pets and reptiles used in the the summer reading program helped fearful children overcome their resistance to a variety of animals and creatures that could be viewed as pets or other inhabitants of the natural world.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34526
Project Title: Project Number:
Building Your Base: Part II 0070-10-0010
Library Name: Project Director:
Mid-Hudson Library System Merribeth K. Advocate
Phone Number: Email:
845-471-6060 54 madvocate@midhudson.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$11,055 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$20,098 $31,153
Number of Persons Served:
700
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Provide tools for the future
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers, Public library trustees  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Technology Infrastructure Intranets and extranets
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Using the expertise and interest of the library system members, a new open source content management system was adopted and organized, providing a well-indexed portal to library services for the Mid-Hudson area libraries.
Project Activities/Methods:
The project required exploration of the more than 1,200 existing web pages to determine a way to priortize user content to ensure ease of access and "findable" resources. Libraries participated in this process at several stages in the development of the final content form. An initial survey polled relevance of user resources. A card sorting exercise helped determine the infrastructure of a new website using the priorities of library system members as determinants. A retreat, in the context of this project, illuminated and reinforced the immediate goals that users and directors hoped to achieve through the web redesign.
Project Outputs:
A total of 73 library system members helped to shape the "relevancy" of newly constructed web resources for the library system. The launch of the new site generated interest and exposure to the methods used for more participatory content creation and collaboration among libraries as a result of news articles published in library trade and teaching publications. One such feature appeared in the new book, "The Accidental Library Marketer" by Kathy Dempsey.
Project Outcomes:
Creating a more responsive and useful website advanced the communication of policy and access to library services throughout the library system. By publicizing the steps involved in collaborative long-range planning, other libraries have been provided help in duplicating the analysis of their goals and the deployment of user resources through a revised web presence.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
"The new structure would be flexible enough to accommodate the different ways people thought and would result in the ability to find complementary resources that were previously solely accessible through unrelated web portals." (comment from library director). Another respondent said: "Flexible site architecture allowed the placement of resources in multiple, findable locations within the site."
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34514
Project Title: Project Number:
Capital District Digitization Project 0070-10-0029
Library Name: Project Director:
Capital District Library Council Susan D’Entremont
Phone Number: Email:
518-438-2500 susan@cdlc.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$33,730 $44,355
Number of Persons Served:
70
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Sustain our cultural heritage Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Cultural Heritage Programs, Digitization and Digital Library Projects Local history, Preservation, Digitization
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This project provided onsite training to additional library council members on digitization projects, with specific workshops on policies for digitization, metadata and the conversion of non-print resources.
Project Activities/Methods:
A digitization field trainer provided onsite support to 39 member libraries and satisfied numerous inquiries by telephone and email. Ten new member institutions contributed significant new digital objects or pages to the digital collaborative website.
Project Outputs:
In total, 792 digital objects were embedded in 2,337 web pages. A compendium of Help Sheets were distributed to all participants. Several half-day workshops devoted to working with complex materials were conducted, allowing standardization of naming and metadata labels.
Project Outcomes:
The outreach for digitization training embraced several new system members including smaller archives and colleges in the Capitol Region. These new members helped sustain the digital growth of the collaborative by digitizing a number of new resources, including realia and three-dimensional objects. The secondary target audience, the statewide public and school populations, were able to utilize the new primary documents in their research and classes as part of their educational pursuits.
Other Results:
With the addition of onsite training, smaller institutions (such as historical societies) successfully captured historical objects in the digital repository, adding new depth and dimension to the online archive.
Anecdotal Info:
The project expanded its capacity by converting three- dimensional objects and other realia to new digital formats. This goal was highlighted by one anecdote regarding the discovery of a cigar box manufactured around the turn of the century by a relative interested in the history of his grandfather’s cigar company.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34595
Project Title: Project Number:
Certification Courses 0070-10-0015
Library Name: Project Director:
North Country Library System Stephen B. Bolton
Phone Number: Email:
315-782-5540 sbolton@ncls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$3,392 $10,757
Number of Persons Served:
535
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training Technical skills
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Two topical teaching strands on building an effective library comprised the focus of this library system’s project. Library certification courses helped library staff achieve a better understanding of ways to deliver services using technology. Additional training focused on website development, Web 2.0 technologies, hardware, networking, operating systems, and applications.
Project Activities/Methods:
Fifteen member libraries and 22 staff participated in a a day-long workshop on Comprehensive Medical Reference. The training focused on consumer health resources freely available on the web and an overview of searching medical literature through professional database resources. Additionally, 19 organizations completed the Information Technology workshops to enhance member libraries’ use of Web 2.0 tools. A program called "Directors Do It All" was offered throughout the library system to ground directors in many aspects of contemporary library service and administration, including technology administration.
Project Outputs:
The success of the training programs was measured by participants’ self assessment of new skills or knowledge. A total of 50% of the participants in the Information Technology Certification course reported gaining five new skills. More than 75% reported attaining 3 new skills, while 100% reported attaining at least two new skills. In a patron survey following training and staff intervention, the percentage of patrons who increased their level of confidence in library staff services totaled 100% of the polled audience. More than 90% of the patrons polled indicated they had learned a useful ITskill as a result of staff intervention at the library.
Project Outcomes:
Improved patron interaction with staff was the major outcome of the project as measured throughout the program. Additionally, each program reported that staff acquired improved confidence in their skills in reference, administration or in responding to technology-related or computing needs of patrons.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34906
Project Title: Project Number:
Chautauqua-Cattaraugus 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant Program 0070-09-1006
Library Name: Project Director:
Chautauqua-Cattaraugus Library System Valle Z. Blair
Phone Number: Email:
716-484-7135 vblair@cclslib.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$6,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$4,863 $10,863
Number of Persons Served:
12,544
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Reading development, Reading readiness, Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Chautauqua-Cattaraugus Library System implemented a systemwide summer reading program to assist the 34 member libraries and branches in developing regional activities to complement the public libraries local initiatives throughout the summer months.
Project Activities/Methods:
The system coordinated a schedule of reading programs and supplemental activities with publications, a reading calendar, and educational materials. Reading logs and certificates for children were distributed for use at all libraries.
Project Outputs:
A total of 2,594 children registered as summer readers in the children’s program, and 173 teens registered in their age category--reading a total of 26,141 books. Of the 772 programs held in libraries, 133 were devoted specifically to teen reading and one was devoted to professional development for staff on building literacy and reading as a leisure choice. The system promoted the summer reading program extensively with announcements on TV (5), radio (9), in newspapers (30), through school visits (18) and on library websites (16). More than 12,000 materials were printed for distribution to children, teens and parents to promote summer reading activities.
Project Outcomes:
Children enrolled in the summer reading program enjoyed the opportunties the program provided to share their interest in characters and stories at library-based events throughout the system. Parents recognized the program’s value in sustaining reading motivation over the summer months as a key benefit for their children’s literacy and reading development.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34921
Project Title: Project Number:
Clinton-Essex-Franklin 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant Program 0070-09-1008
Library Name: Project Director:
Clinton-Essex-Franklin Library System Julie Wever
Phone Number: Email:
518-834-9932 wever@cefls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$6,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$8,000 $14,000
Number of Persons Served:
6,802
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens, Literacy Programs, Mobile Services Bookmobile services
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
A total of 23 member libraries and one bookmobile utilized the "Be Creative" and "Express Yourself" themes to explore reading during the summer months and created special events and learning activities to supplement and promote reading and reading discovery. Special attention to residents, such as homeschooled rural families who normally might not be able to access local libraries for this type of programming, was addressed using the outreach capabilities of the bookmobile.
Project Activities/Methods:
The system implemented a "Take A Bite Out of Books" component to its usual summer reading program, based on a Jeopardy-style quiz game. A series of high-interest titles were purchased for rotation among libraries to help readers compete in the July "Battle of the Book" competition. Building on a "Let’s Talk Tween" workshop the previous year, a continuing education program with consultant helped librarians prepare a program for the teen services program. Educational activities, articles and pictures helped to promote the summer reading program.
Project Outputs:
A total of 1,201 children and 256 teens registered for acitivities in the summer reading program. The 2009 Summer Trailblazer newsletter focused on the success of summer reading and reading development. A total of 28 library staff participated in the reading choice and program training for teens sponsored through this project.
Project Outcomes:
Using a survey, 75% of children and their parents reported the benefit of selecting a themed reading program for summer. Group reading and programming activities helped system libraries sustain continuing interest in the summer reading program.
Other Results:
Member libraries reported partnering and promoting the program with new community partners to build participation and interest in the summer reading program.
Anecdotal Info:
"Thank you for the summer reading program. It really keeps my kids reading all summer." - comment from a parent at Schroon Lake Public Library.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34715
Project Title: Project Number:
Continuing Education for Library Managers 0070-10-0019
Library Name: Project Director:
Southern Adirondack Library System Jill Ryder
Phone Number: Email:
518-584-7300 jryder@sals.edu
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $125
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$16,200 $23,690
Number of Persons Served:
45
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training Library science education and skills, Management skills, Technical skills
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Southern Adirondack "Continuing Education" project developed a certificate program in partnership with the Public Library Association and Adirondack Community College to implement improved library services. The program explored two topics: Networking, and Planning and Facilities. Participants were charged with developing project plans in one of these areas with assistance from course facilitators and library mentors. Through this grant project, training for library administrators was developed in partnership with a regional community college and provided the structure for a continuing education program designed to improve library service plans in core management functions. The project included training topics focused on networking, community, and the implementation of a project plan. The implementation of the program plans developed through the grant will be monitored and supported by the Southern Adirondack Library System (SALS).
Project Activities/Methods:
Topics designed to enhance the perspective and technical skills of library managers were developed and included sessions on Organizations, Personnel, Technology Issues, Planning, and Management of Facilities and Buildings. Consultants were recruited as training leaders. Library action plans based on the training were developed in each of these program areas. Participants earned a certificate of completion in support of professional development activities from the American Library Association and Adirondack Community College.
Project Outputs:
Approximately half of the system’s member libraries were represented in the training sessions, with 81 participants attending. All trainees successfully developed action plans, and 15 libraries implemented recommendations from their action plans in one or more of library service areas. These plans were made available through the library system portal.
Project Outcomes:
Librarians created organizational change in their libraries and in their community interactions through training and discussion. Creating better communication with community officials built support, advocacy, and awareness of library priorities in towns throughout the Southern Adirondack region. The inititiative created a direct correlation between planning and implementation, as part of a comprehensive logic model for changes leading to improved library services in two categories: human resource management and building facility management. 100% of the participating libraries determined that their action plans created improved services within their local library community. 100% of the participating library managers recognized the need and benefit of working closely with the community to improve support for library buildings and facilities.
Other Results:
Coordinating maintenance with town officials allowed select libraries to implement improved access, signage, and repairs with greater cost effectiveness.
Anecdotal Info:
In the Town of Round Lake, a historical hamlet, the Clark Library developed a partnership with Village Trustees to create signage to guide patrons to the Library. The Library also partnered with the Town Planning Department to create directional road signs with the New York State Department of Transportation on new routing signage near a rotary from a major road access point nearby.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34519
Project Title: Project Number:
E Seniors in the Driver’s Seat 0070-10-0008
Library Name: Project Director:
Clinton-Essex-Franklin Library System Betsy Brooks
Phone Number: Email:
518-563-5190 brooksb@cefls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$5,975 $13,340
Number of Persons Served:
296
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Rural populations, Seniors  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Training for the Public Computer training, Information literacy, Internet training
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary?green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This project targeted training for seniors with the help of teens throughout the 12 member library systems in upstate New York to enable them to use electronic services more effectively and with greater confidence. The rural nature of this region, plus the factors of education and isolation, increased the need of training for this population. Patrons expressed their need of basic computer skills to access the wealth of information that can be found online.
Project Activities/Methods:
The training program was modeled after e-citizen training in conjunction with boy scout groups and computer club members. By providing an open forum for learners, the project expanded access to a wide variety of informational and educational resources, including the catalog resources and webpage resources available at individual libraries. Additional self-paced online modules allowed learners the opportunity to improve their understanding of the search strategies and the online interface of Google, library catalogs, and in-house database tools. Mentoring seniors through demonstration classes and the use of young adult mentors provided reinforcement in data entry and user access to many library services. Six classroom presentation workshops helped seniors achieve a change in skills and attitude as a result of training activities. Project publicity and course resources were made available through the system’s website.
Project Outputs:
The project sought to increase resource use and access by 50% as measured by self assessment in pre- and post-training evaluations for over 200 seniors. Topics for training included workshops on email, picture-sharing, Internet safety, access to reliable health resources and Internet search strategies, including the use of Novelny.
Project Outcomes:
This project raised the working knowledge of library services, technology skills and online access to information for seniors and other targeted groups in rural upstate New York. Learning to use the library’s web presence to access information and library services comprised one aspect of the training. However, developing more digital literacy skills using the Internet, email and computer basics provided a foundation on which seniors can build a greater comfort level in accessing the online information needed to live in a digital world.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:
Many parts of upstate New York are very rural and people do not have a library nearby. This project used a population base that is very tech-savy to help another segment of the population that didn’t grow up with computers and needs help in navigating online resources.

Project Code: 2009-NY-37155
Project Title: Project Number:
Expanding Library Networking and Collaboration for Improved Learning and Access
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Carol A. Desch
Phone Number: Email:
518-474-7196 cdesch@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$784,716 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $784,716
Number of Persons Served:
16,156,692
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services  
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?green check mark
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The New York State Library provided state-level leadership, planning, coordination, consultation, and support services to enable library systems and libraries to create and expand library networking activities, partnerships and collaborations to improve learning at all levels, and to improve access to library services for all New Yorkers.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library worked with the library community and other partners across the State to assist libraries to increase their capacities for building community support, networking and developing public and private partnerships and collaborations to better serve their users. This included, but was not limited to: 1. Partnering with 73 library systems to help them provide high quality, cost-effective services to meet the needs of local communities. 2. Working in partnership with public libraries and public library systems to strengthen and enhance the delivery of library services through the formation of public library districts and modernization of library buildings. 3. Reducing the number of New Yorkers without a local public library. 4. Monitoring networking grants and service improvement projects. 5. Building a supportive network within State government to advance the quality and availability of library services to all New Yorkers.
Project Outputs:
In 1999 there were 1.3 million unserved New Yorkers living outside the boundaries of a chartered public library. As of September 2010, working in collaboration with others, the State Library helped to provide public library services to 354,963 of that 1.3 million, an increase of 2.4 percent over the prior year. The State Library partnered with a statewide expert taskforce and public library systems in a supportive, collaborative network to expand public library services to more local communities. Four meetings were attended by 48 people. As of September 2010, one more locality had formed new public library district; bringing the total to 40 new districts created since 1999. The State Library also partnered with the 23 public library systems and public libraries to assess the needs for public library construction and renovation in 1,080 buildings in the State. Libraries reported a $2.53 billion need for 2010-2015. The State Library, the public library systems and other State agencies such as the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the State Historic Preservation Office jointly sponsored five regional meetings and one statewide webinar attended by 240 people to discuss collaborative strategies for addressing public library construction and renovation needs in New York with a particular focus on accessibility, energy-efficiency and green technologies. The State Library has worked in partnership with other offices within the State Education Department, the network of 41 school library systems, the state library association and graduate schools of library and information science, to implement an eighteen month action plan for improving the quality of New York’s school libraries and school library systems that resulted from the 2009 summit with school library leaders and state-level education policy. The State Library awarded and monitored 32 LSTA service improvement grants to library systems. Networking for enhanced lifelong learning opportunities in communities across the state was supported through 408 state grants awarded to libraries and library systems by the State Library. State Library staff made 59 site visits related to expanding networking, partnership and collaborative activities for learning and access in local communities. Altogether State Library staff conducted 23 networking events attended by 893 participants
Project Outcomes:
As of September 2010, 354,963 or 27.3 percent of the 1.3 million formerly unserved New Yorkers now have a local library in their community.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35432
Project Title: Project Number:
Expanding Western New York Legacy: Preserving and Digitizing Collections Training 0070-10-0027
Library Name: Project Director:
Western New York Library Resources Council Sheryl Knab
Phone Number: Email:
716-633-0705 12 sknab@wnylrc.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$9,225 $19,850
Number of Persons Served:
35
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide tools for the future Sustain our cultural heritage
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Digitization and preservation training were provided to build a wider expertise regionally and to expand the digital collections supported by the Western New York Legacy project. The target audience included support and archival staff, museums, archives, historical institutions, librarians and members of the Western New York Library Resources Council. The programs focused on promoting the curation of collections related to the culture and history of Western New York.
Project Activities/Methods:
The training classes included a Digitization Boot Camp, a Preservation Institute, and a conservation class on the Care and Management of Paper and Print Collections. The programs were designed to create practical strategies for preserving and digitizing images and objects to add to the collections already available online. Five collections were improved or added, including: 1825: a Pivotal Year on the Frontier, the Buffalo Architecture Collection; The Early Records of the Sacarissa Lodge; The Grand Island Dispatch, a newspaper; and the Dr. RV Pierce Medial Artifacts.
Project Outputs:
Ten collections were developed for online use in conjunction with 13 training opportunities for regional participants. Evaluations were completed for each program and respondents strongly agreed that the sessions met their expectations and that the presenters had a good command of the subject. A total of 516 publications, lesson plans, documents and bibliographies were created as part of the project and two websites were further developed.
Project Outcomes:
Building a regional core of digitization experts through the program enabled member institutions to collaborate and support one another in preservating the cultural history of Western New York. Digitizing five new collections enabled the Western New York Legacy Project to expand access to significant regional collections for the public and stimulate new collaborations with schools and students for digital literacy exploration and curriculum enrichment using primary documents and artifacts.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35415
Project Title: Project Number:
Explore Your Shore Discovering Community History @ Your Library 0070-10-0005
Library Name: Project Director:
Upper Hudson Library System Mary J. Fellows
Phone Number: Email:
518-437-9880 228 mary@uhls.ny.us
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$11,053 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$17,680 $28,733
Number of Persons Served:
2,734
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Children, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Outreach Services, Staff Development Education and Training, Training for the Public  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Explore Your Shore: Discovering Community History@Your Library trained staff to develop family literacy programs using the theme: “Hudson 400” to coincide with New York’s Quadricentennial celebrations. Intergenerational and interactive family and leisure reading activities highlighted the collaboration among libraries, local historical societies and schools that partnered in this project.
Project Activities/Methods:
Collaborations with outside agencies to stimulate library parterships were a core activity of the project. A wide range of activities were developed to correlate to the "historical" emphasis in the Explore Your Shore program. Library staff worked to develop outreach activities based on the rich Hudson River area traditions, including quilting, papermaking, folk art, and oral histories of the region; pioneer activities including historical dress, games, songs and foods. An emphasis on four target areas: Dutch history; Native American culture; ecology, and Hudson River commerce helped make the programs interesting for children and adults alike. A life-size doll representing Henry Hudson helped children and families embrace the idea of community history, and "Henry" was transported to many library events, making collaboration activities with the cultural offerings in the City of Albany successful.
Project Outputs:
A total of 34 staff were trained and became involved in the activities for the Explore Your Shore program, which drew over 2,700 participants. A video of Henry’s travels was uploaded to the Upper Hudson website at www.uhls.org/videos/ Hudson_Exploring_3000.wmv/
Project Outcomes:
A total of 80% of the participating librarians created three new partnerships in their communities supporting this initiative and also identified how they could be melded to family literacy efforts at their libraries. Strategies for incorporating literacy activities into the program were accomplished at all libraries. Libraries became more skilled in presenting engaging family literacy programs as well. In total, 90% of the libraries surveyed indicated that their ability to support these programs improved.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34920
Project Title: Project Number:
Finger Lakes 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant Program 0070-09-1005
Library Name: Project Director:
Finger Lakes Library System Annette Birdsall
Phone Number: Email:
607-273-4074 annette@flls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$6,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$1,458 $7,458
Number of Persons Served:
16,362
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens, Literacy Programs, Mobile Services Reading development, Reading readiness, Summer reading programs, Bookmobile services
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The 2009 Summer Reading@New York Libraries theme formed the basis of the program activities used to promote summer reading in the Finger Lakes region including partnerships and promotion with school libraries, area summer recreation programs, farmers’ markets, local reading and library blogs and local news weeklies.
Project Activities/Methods:
A total of 33 libraries throughout the system participated in the summer reading program, which encompassed performance of arts and activities programming using the themes for children and teens promoted throughout the 2009 Summer Reading@New York Libraries program. Program materials were purchased to helped build an interest and local awareness of the summer reading program
Project Outputs:
A total of 3,981 children and 827 teens registered for the summer reading program and 575 local programs drew 16,362 attendees to local summer reading events and activities held in conjunction with the summer reading program for children and teens. Performance programs and mini-grants helped libraries offer a varied and rich patchwork of activities throughout the summer, which included storytimes at zoos, face painting, pre-school programs, puppet shows, and drama programs.
Project Outcomes:
Children, teens and families recognized the collaboration between public and school libraries, which raised reading interest in the summer reading program.
Other Results:
Member libraries reported partnering and promoting the program in new and inventive ways across many platforms and user groups.
Anecdotal Info:
"We could not keep the books on the shelf. Patrons loved our selection of craft and art books purchase through the mini-grants. One program called Comic Creations helped children to draw and write real comic strips, as a result of a workshop combined with drawing activities".
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34929
Project Title: Project Number:
Four County 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1011
Library Name: Project Director:
Four County Library System Starr LaTronica
Phone Number: Email:
607-723-8236 slatronica@4cls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$6,000 $700
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$7,000 $13,700
Number of Persons Served:
19,435
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Reading development, Reading readiness, Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Four County Library System engaged summer readers to sustain an interest in books and learning over the summer months, which helped libraries become more central in the vision of teaching and learning within the community.
Project Activities/Methods:
Planned activities included performances and mini-grants to member libraries. These supplemented the ongoing reading program by providing additional copies of reading resources or by providing performance events for children and teens that were publicized through a web-based calendar. Examples of the featured programs included readers’ theater, bookmaking workshops, note card exchanges with book reviews and many other activities. The Bookmobile provided additional outreach for the summer reading program in the Four County Library System.
Project Outputs:
A total of 5,147 children and teens registered for summer reading programs. Attendance at 844 planned activities held throughout the system was far higher, reported at 19,400. The web-based calendar for summer reading activities received 2,703 hits. Intensive print promotion through newsletters and postings sustained interest and attendance throughout the member libraries. The program was promoted by 78 media outlets, 23 presentations conducted at schools, and 38 local businesses and organizations displayed summer reading materials, in addition to the website promotion at individual libraries.
Project Outcomes:
Families and children recognized that libraries are a leader in educational, cultural and recreational programs throughout the summer. Engaging children and teens in reading and leisiure activities in the summer created new library clientele during the rest of the year.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
One library created a teen program independently with activities parallel to the children’s program, but with different content. The staff has had "many compliments from happy, excited, impressed adults" who hope that the summer program will lead to a year-round monthly program for teens.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34515
Project Title: Project Number:
Heritage New York 0070-10-0031
Library Name: Project Director:
Central New York Library Resources Council Penelope J.M. Klein
Phone Number: Email:
315-446-5446 pjklein@clrc.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $10,625
Number of Persons Served:
5,000
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Sustain our cultural heritage
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This technical training and digitization project added to the earlier contributions by the Central New York Library Resources Council cultural institutions, broadening the Central New York Heritage digital repository at cnyheritage.org.
Project Activities/Methods:
Several new organizations, including a seminary, a law library, local colleges and the Syracuse University Archives, were selected to participate in digital projects training. In total, 16 additional institutions received training in support of the digitization projects underway in the region. Three pilot projects were selected to continue the development of an online repositiory for digital objects.
Project Outputs:
Five workshops and numerous resources were created to support the digitization program, including training materials, the digitization plan, a Digi-wiki and Central New York Heritage promotional displays. A Central New York Project Management Digitization Handbook provided guidelines and benchmarks for participating in the project, recommending metadata standards and workflows for digitization projects. Quantitatively, more than 600 objects from three collections were digitized in the second year of this pilot: 40 scrapbooks on the life of immigrant Russian communities in Jordanville, the archives of documents on Elizabeth Blackwell, the first female student to receive a medical degree from Geneva Medical College, and collections from the Dewitt Community College.
Project Outcomes:
The project has succeeded in creating a uniform platform for the creation of a digital archive via training for 19 institutions currently contributing to the respository. Widening the scope of participation by institutions in the four county region substantially increased the usage and interest in digital collections by member institutions.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35615
Project Title: Project Number:
Hudson Valley Historic Newspapers 0070-10-0026
Library Name: Project Director:
Southeastern New York Library Resources Council Tessa Killian
Phone Number: Email:
845-883-9065 14 killian@senylrc.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $10,395
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$16,719 $37,739
Number of Persons Served:
5,562
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Sustain our cultural heritage
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Children, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary?green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Southeastern New York Library Resources Council (SENYLRC) digitized new local history records using a method and infrastructure that included creating text through optical character recognition, linked image files, metadata and article-level segmentation for full online access at www.hrvh.org.
Project Activities/Methods:
Based on survey feedback, an additional decade of news from the Kingston Freeman from 1903-1912 was selected for inclusion in the digital archive. Additionally, sample issues from another regional newspaper, The Rockland County Messenger, were also digitized. The project was successful in coordinating a multi-step conversion involving disparate contract sources to obtain satisfactory resolution and integration of the records. Testing the integration of image and text files as a quality control measure involved search and retrieval, an examination of indexing controls, and resolution of type conversion flaws and item header clarification. Public outreach to promote the site was posted on the Daily Freeman itself and related Ulster and Dutchess County blogs. Emails were targeted to schools, school libraries and all SENYLRC consortia members. Postcards with site information were distributed widely through meetings, conferences, and public libraries. Additionally, a paper survey was created for distribution at public library sites. Evaluation activities helped the project determine future digitization resources.
Project Outputs:
A total of 5,586 unique site visits using the news archive for genealogy research occurred and 561,828 page views were recorded. A total of 26,342 news pages were loaded onto the server, requiring an estimated 886 hours of actual processing. In content, 26,342 images and 30,077 XML or content files were loaded successfully to the website.
Project Outcomes:
Patrons were satisfied with the ease of use of the digital archive, as measured by a patron survey, where 94% of the respondents indicated they were either very satisfied or satisfied with the search capabilities of the site. 75% of patrons surveyed also indicated a preference for searching in an online environment as opposed to microfilm searches. Creating a digital archive provided a process and methodology for future digitization projects so that the member institutions of the Southeastern New York Library Resources Council can continue the technological and cultural access to the regional history of the Hudson Valley.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:
This project has leveraged LSTA funds and has produced an award-winning cultural history website - www.hrvh.org

Project Code: 2009-NY-34531
Project Title: Project Number:
Learn and Meet Online with Web Conferencing 0070-10-0011
Library Name: Project Director:
Mid-York Library System J. Wooldridge or Linda Manfredo
Phone Number: Email:
315-735-8328 jwooldridge@midyork.org; lmanfredo@midyork.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$50,900 $58,265
Number of Persons Served:
127
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Provide tools for the future
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training Technical skills
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This initiative created the opportunity to see libraries as online destinations and communities. Member libraries, the community at large, and students in regional high school distance learning programs were able to utilize the webinar and conferencing tool to hold online programs, training, and discussion. The Mid-York Library System also used the new WebEx online classroom to provide a training tool for system members in large groups and one-on-one sessions to enable staff to practice leading synchronous online meetings.
Project Activities/Methods:
Mid York subscribed to webinar technology for resource and database training, library management conferences, local high school distance education programs and many other community-based meetings. Following in-depth training by InSync, one trainer was able to then peer-train many other library staff members in small groups or through individual online sessions.
Project Outputs:
A total of 48 workshops, programs or conferences were conducted in the Webex environment; 127 staff attended various programs and workshops using the WebEx software.
Project Outcomes:
The webinar paradigm for teaching and learning has helped generate communication and partnership among rural libraries, improved the use of database resources, and enhanced library education opportunities for high school students.
Other Results:
The success with this form of conferencing has led Mid-York to sustain its subscription in 2010-11, following the end of the grant-supported purchase.
Anecdotal Info:
"Web Ex has been a great asset to our library which is about 30 miles from our library system headquarters. We have used it for library system meetings when the driving has not been safe for travel or when we were short-staffed." (Director, Barb Coger, Hamilton Public Library) *" If we didn’t have WebEx - we would miss out on the valuable contributions from members who can’t make it to Mid-York for one reason or another" (H. McManus, Utica Public Library)
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34720
Project Title: Project Number:
Library Directors and Trustees: Working Together to Manage Change 0070-10-0020
Library Name: Project Director:
Southern Tier Library System Ristiina Wigg
Phone Number: Email:
607-962-3141 wiggr@stls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $2,325
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$1,100 $10,790
Number of Persons Served:
277
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Strengthen communities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers, Public library trustees  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training, Training for the Public  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary?green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This training initiative reached the trustees of 39 member libraries in the Southern Tier Library System to extend communications to new supporters and trustees and strengthen support for funding and managing 21st Century library and technology services.
Project Activities/Methods:
Ten workshops were developed with an emphasis on how to provide library services in a changing environment. Bernard A. Margolis, NY’s State Librarian, presented a program entitled "A Library State of Mind," while another program asked: "Now that you’ve found out what the patron wants, what do you do?" This series of workshops and presentations addressed how to incorporate new communication tools such as Facebook and Twitter successfully.
Project Outputs:
Many elements of the training have been developed as accessible links for future use. A wiki on Library 2.0 and community is available at http:// usercenteredchange.pb.works.com/ and resources for trustees have also been updated to include access to PowerPoint presentations, a webinar and a new handbook. Evaluation surveys were conducted to assess the value of the training programs and on average, 65% of the respondents indicated that the libraries changed their business protocols as a result of the information presented in the workshops.
Project Outcomes:
Using technology and Web 2.0 more effectively helped libraries develop new patron groups and new interactive communications with patrons. Using applications that can be accessed on mobile devices helped libraries create a more dynamic presence as part of an outreach strategy for market penetration. New user services, including circulation notices and program announcements, have helped libraries to build grass-roots connections with the user communities.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
The Alfred Box of Books Library created the first Facebook page in the system at www.facebook.com/pages/Alfred-NY/Alfred-Box-of-Books-Library/4200263100 after attending the workshop, Serving Library Customers Today. After attending the Socialnomic workshop, one attendee said, "I assembled a list of resources with which I could approach and explore social networking." Another attendee commented, "I would say that workshops like this one consistently expand consciousness and bring library-oriented people together as a team."
Exemplary Reason:
This project promoted cooperation between library staff and their library trustees and brought many people into the 21st Century world of technology.

Project Code: 2009-NY-34521
Project Title: Project Number:
Long Island Memories - The Long Island Library Resource Council Regional Digitization Program 0070-10-0030
Library Name: Project Director:
Long Island Library Resources Council Herbert Biblo
Phone Number: Email:
631-632-6650 hbiblo@lilrc.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$7,500 $18,125
Number of Persons Served:
144
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Sustain our cultural heritage
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Cultural Heritage Programs, Digitization and Digital Library Projects  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This project expanded the collaborative efforts of more than 40 institutions, including local government and a school library, to create a digital archive focused on the history of Long Island. The repository has preserved art, newspapers, oral histories, manuscripts and memorabilia for the general public, with researchers adding to the availability of regional history archives across New York.
Project Activities/Methods:
The project spanned a two-year timeline. In conjunction with the training, additional collections/materials were digitized, including a journal by World War II prisoners of war. Participating libraries linked to the collections on their websites, in addition to housing the digital objects in the Long Island Memories website.
Project Outputs:
The Long Island Memories site has evaluated its success by quantitative measures of website activity. In the project year, the site recorded 90,252 visits. Five workshops were held with attendance by 144 participants and 31 institutions reflected and linked to material from the Long Island Memories on their respective websites.
Project Outcomes:
The project added content, depth and finding aids supporting the research of historians and researchers using the enhanced collection. The expansion of this digital archive reflects libraries’ commitment to provide access to historical resources otherwise unavailable to the public in a standardized format compatible with current digitization standards.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
The site has assisted a British author researching World War I about the contributions of women in the war. "Winona Ryder" was an American supporting the war effort as a canteen worker who lost her life in France during World War I. The details of her life were preserved in the Long Island Memories archive and made available for this author’s research. Additionally, the US Army has utilized the digital content about Camp Upton located on the site to complete a text, The Army Medical Department, 1917-1971, written by Mary C. Gillett. A veteran from World War II contributed journal accounts from World War II prisoners of war to a school curriculum initiative, creating a new primary document resource from veterans war accounts.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-37503
Project Title: Project Number:
LSTA Administration
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Bernard A. Margolis
Phone Number: Email:
518-474-5930 bmargolis@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$369,346 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $369,346
Number of Persons Served:
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
SLAA LSTA Administration  
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The purpose of the Administration Project was to provide support for overall administration of the LSTA funds awarded to the State Library and its parent organization, the New York State Education Department. The federal LSTA program is administered for the residents of New York State by the State Library to ensure that such funds are used properly and effectively. The funds are administered objectively and fairly so that all library types included in the state’s 7,000 libraries can benefit from LSTA funding, in accordance with the State Library’s IMLS-approved current LSTA Five-Year Plan.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library, as a part of the New York State Education Department, is the officially designated state agency charged with the responsibility of administering the federal LSTA program of funding for the State’s libraries. As such, the State Library functions as the central coordinating organization for all libraries in the state, and is the sole entity to receive and disburse this federal money. The funds are disbursed in accordance with accountability to the federal grantor agency and in accordance with the stated activities in the State Library’s current LSTA Five-Year Plan. Under the terms of LSTA, the State Library is authorized to use up to 4% of the State’s allotment to support administration of the program. The $369,346 Administrative Cost amount entirely consists of indirect costs charged by the State Library’s parent agency, the New York State Education Department. Staff costs associated with LSTA administrative duties are paid by State funds. LSTA funded indirect cost supports New York State Education Department offices and New York State Civil Service that benefit the federal programs and activities. The State Education Department offices which are supported by indirect costs include Budget Coordination, Fiscal Management, Grants Finance, and Human Services.
Project Outputs:
As a result of the proper administration of the LSTA funds, effective statewide library services are enacted. All necessary federal, state, local laws, rules, and regulations related to the LSTA program are followed. Additionally, the State Library’s current Five-Year LSTA Plan is effectively administered, the activities of the Plan are carried out, and the goals stated in the Plan are realized.
Project Outcomes:
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-37497
Project Title: Project Number:
Making New York State History Materials Accessible
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Loretta Ebert
Phone Number: Email:
518-473-1189 lebert@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$258,705 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $258,705
Number of Persons Served:
174,151
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Sustain our cultural heritage Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Cultural Heritage Programs  
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Building on existing collection strengths, the New York State Library (NYSL) broadened and strengthened access to New York State historical and genealogical materials in order to improve access to this material for all New Yorkers, both onsite at the NYSL and remotely.
Project Activities/Methods:
The NYSL’s Public Services New York State History Work Group continued to identify and acquire published historical resources about New York State localities. The History Work Group has divided responsibility for various portions of the state among the members, who identify materials including local newspapers on microfilm for purchase and attempt to locate “fugitive” local history publications. The State Library’s Documents and Digitization Unit continues to scan materials in the State Library’s historic collections that focus on different aspects of New York State’s history. Library collection development Subject Coordinators used staff and customer suggestions to select priority historical items to be digitized. In addition, staff from Public Services scanned items from Special Collections in response to customer requests and, whenever practical, made these items available to the public online. To increase access to New York history materials in the State Library collections, Library staff created finding aids to materials in the Manuscripts & Special Collections Unit and added these finding aids to the Library website. The NYSL worked in partnership with other units in the Office of Cultural Education (State Archives and State Museum) on digitization projects, exhibits and public programs. NYSL staff participated in meetings of the Archives Advisory Committee and have attended and exhibited at statewide conferences and meetings on New York State history. The State Library also conducted a number of history-related public programs/classes between 10/2008 and 9/2010
Project Outputs:
From 10/1/2008 through 9/30/2010, 53 new finding aids to materials in Manuscripts/Special Collections were added to the NYSL’s website allowing the NYSL to increase access to these unique materials dramatically. An additional 12 finding aids (already online) were revised and reposted. There were 689,095 requests (pageviews) for files in the Finding Aids directory and the Civil War finding aids (which are in a different directory) out of a total number of requests for the entire NYSL site of 15,009,999.* The NYSL estimates this represents about 175,630 visitor sessions, which is 4.6% of the total of 3,818,042 sessions.* A total of 1,287 people attended 23 history-related public programs held between 10/1/2008 and 9/30/2010 and 342 people attended 10 genealogy programs and training classes. *When the Library moved to a new server in 2009, data was not recorded for two months so the actual totals are a little higher.
Project Outcomes:
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-37495
Project Title: Project Number:
Making Resources Available Through Technology
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Loretta Ebert
Phone Number: Email:
518-473-1189 lebert@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$2,766,357 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $2,766,357
Number of Persons Served:
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Provide tools for the future
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services, Interlibrary Loan, Virtual Library Services Government information services and archives, Reference services, Document and materials delivery, Portals and related Web projects
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The New York State Library (NYSL) used its resources and technology to make information available for scholarship and research, interlibrary loan, and reference. The NYSL serves the government, libraries, and people of New York onsite, by telephone, mail, and e-mail, through interlibrary loan, and via its website.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library (NYSL) provided access to its resources through its online integrated catalog/information system, Excelsior; the scanning of full-text NYS documents and other items; interlibrary loan; reference assistance to onsite and offsite customers and its website serving as a gateway to electronic information. The NYSL also provided consulting and backup services to 78 selective Federal Document Depository libraries in NYS to improve public access to Federal government information. In 2009, the Library began allowing customers with a “P” NYSL Borrower’s Card to directly request ILL materials via Iliad, the online ILL software. The Library expanded access to online information by adding new STM-related and business-related online resources, as well as a number of online journals and e-books. The list of commercial online databases on the NYSL website was revised to include information about customer access to specific databases and provide improved subject access. New web pages and finding aids were created to improve access to Library collections. The Documents and Digital Collections unit is responsible for scanning NYS documents and items in the Library’s historic collections to meet the research needs of the people and government of NYS. In December 2008, the Library released a revised, second edition CD of the papers and correspondence of Sir William Johnson which features more digitized images, improved accuracy of the scans and electronic indexing, allowing for searching of the entire collection on CD. In Spring 2009, the NYS Library and NYS Archives entered into a contract with The Generation Network (TGN) for a digitization and indexing project. The NYSL and NYSA will provide TGN with selected historical materials. TGN will digitize and index these items and will provide free, unrestricted access of the images digitized through this contract to all NYS residents on the Ancestry.com site via a NY webpage. In October 2009, four new web pages were developed to highlight and link to NYS Museum publications digitized by the NYSL. In September 2010, the Library published and released a new CD entitled “The Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation and Related Documents from the Collection of the New York State Library.” Library staff investigated and evaluated alternative digital management systems to replace the Library’s existing system. After investigating the options, NYSL selected and purchased ArchivalWare. The NYSL continued to expand borrowing privileges to NYS residents. NYS Resident Borrowers receive direct borrowing privileges and access to NOVELNY databases. In September 2009, the information on the NYSL website about applying for a NYSL Borrower’s Card was revised to include detailed information on the types of NYSL Borrower Cards and a downloadable copy of each Borrower Card application. In May 2009, the Library began offering a mediated fax service for the public for a fee. The Library will send and receive faxes for customers. NYSL staff continue to utilize the Library’s computer classroom for providing staff and customers with hands-on training for electronic resources. The Library continued to provide customized presentations delivered offsite to governmental and non-governmental organizations. Presentations to non-governmental organizations included the SUNY Upstate Medical University, Columbia County Council on the Arts, Capital District Community Loan Fund, the Salvation Army, American Association of Grant Professionals, Researching New York Conference and the NYS Coalition Against Domestic Violence. During 2009 and 2010, Library staff worked with attorneys in NYS Department of Health, NYS Department of Labor, NYS Office for Temporary and Disability Assistance and NYS Department of Environmental Conservation to offer classes in legal and medical online databases that provided attorneys who attended the class with CLE credit.
Project Outputs:
From 10/1/2008–9/30/2010, the NYSL posted 564 "offers" lists from selective depository libraries on its website as part of its regional responsibilities in the Federal Document Depository Program. From 10/2008-9/2010, the State Library received 60,709 interlibrary loan requests; 50,610 of these requests were filled. As of September 2010, the State Library had 28,784 e-journals and newspapers; 53 new finding aids were added to the NYSL website; and 12 finding aids were revised. From 10/1/2008-9/30/2010, there were 3,818,042 visitor sessions and 15,009,999 page views on the New York State Library website. (The number of visitor sessions and page views only covers a 22 months; when the Library website moved to a new server, there was an error in configuring the log files which prevented the log data from being recorded.) During the same period, there were 175,630 visitor sessions and 689,095 page views for the Manuscript & Special Collections finding aids. Twelve new collection/services-related web pages were created and added to the NYSL website. There were 1,164,275 searches on Excelsior, the NYSL online integrated catalog, and 1,218,659 searches on the Library’s online databases. Visitors to the NYSL website downloaded 457,818 digital documents. As of 9/30/2010, there are 4,580 individuals with NYS Resident Borrower cards. Reference transactions (including ready reference, extended reference, correspondence, and email) for 10/1/2008–9/30/2010 were 198,103. A total of 49 training sessions were held in the computer classroom and at offsite locations that focused on using online resources, the Internet and the Library website. The total attendance at these sessions was 882. Library staff also conducted 27 grants training sessions, including grants information available through online resources, for staff from local community groups. Total attendance at the grant training sessions was 71. Library staff scanned 227,298 pages of New York State documents and downloaded 4,005 born-digital New York State documents from 2008-2010. An additional 31,805 pages of historic documents and special collections materials were digitized. A total of 780 pages of materials were added to the digital documents management system from scans done in the Document Delivery Unit for customers.
Project Outcomes:
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Comments on NYSL digital documents: “I’m a researcher at the National University of Ireland in Galway, Ireland. I’m currently working on some material which is similar to material from New York described in the Bulletin of the New York State Museum, 1900, volume 39 - Paleontologic papers / by John M. Clarke PH. D., state paleontologist, October 1900. I was able to access this document through the NYSL Digital Collections which, may I say, is a fantastic service. I have been looking unsuccessfully for this article for some time before becoming aware of the Digital Collections archive!” “Wonderful - I know someone in the Judicial Institute that will be very excited to hear of this. It is a big help to me.” “I’m glad to see the State Library digitizing some of these important Native American documents – this will make these important documents accessible.” Comments on attendees at online training sessions: “Thank you very much. We appreciate you both taking the time to train our staff. The training was excellent and we will all find it so valuable. As we gain more experience accessing resources and reference materials, we will be in touch for follow up.” “The speakers were very helpful and learning about the alert feature was very interesting.” “We appreciate your efforts to come to Southeastern (NY Library Resources Council) to show how to use the website. People attending the workshop commented that the information was useful and valuable.” Comments from customers with Reference and email questions: “The information you just sent me is very useful and I greatly appreciate the time and effort you put into this.” “I had tried a few other avenues and nobody would take the time to help me. Thank you.” “I just wanted to send a note of thanks to you. You’ve been immensely helpful in a situation in which I’m trying to help out my nephew. Now that he knows where to go and what he’s looking for, he should be all set. Once again, thank you.” “Thank you so much for all your efforts with regards to trying to locate the article for me. Thank you for the advice about going out to Queens--that will be my next step.” “Thank you very much. You guys are good. This is most helpful. I knew something did not quite ring true when I read the article.” “The librarian was able to track down some very old and complex NY state statutes for (her company). The information was needed on a rush basis for…. This was a convoluted request. He deftly pieced together the bits of information we had and he located the exact statues we needed. And he did all the research in time for our deadline.” “Thank You for making this an easy process for me. Your customer service has been EXCELLENT!!!” “ I wanted to express my gratitude for incredibly efficient, knowledgeable and courteous response I received from librarian ---- when I asked for help last month with a research project. She not only found the articles I requested but two others in different issues I might’ve missed. She then arranged for prompt duplication of these publications which were delivered to my email address. I live near Washington, DC, and am writing a novel. The NYSL is the sole repository of The Cohoes Cataract, as far as I know. It would’ve cost me a lot to visit Albany and spend time making copies of microfilm. ” Comments from new Borrowers: “I want to thank you enormously for this! As an unaffiliated scholar, the resources you provide are invaluable. The service you provide contributes not only to the full and free dissemination of knowledge, but also makes a profound ethical contribution insofar as resources sometimes restricted to a privileged few are made democratically available to all.”
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35012
Project Title: Project Number:
Mid-Hudson 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1003
Library Name: Project Director:
Mid-Hudson Library System Christina Ryan-Linder
Phone Number: Email:
845-471-6060 clinder@midhudson.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$2,705 $14,705
Number of Persons Served:
50,631
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Reading development, Reading readiness, Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Mid-Hudson Library System used the collaborative themes "Be Creative" and "Express Yourself" to inspire a broad range of activities to supplement a rich reading presentation program using hand-held Flip Mino video cameras to create new patron-produced movie clips, which encouraged storymaking as well as storytelling.
Project Activities/Methods:
The unifying themes of "Be Creative" and "Express Yourself" helped inspire program activities that were broad-ranging child-centered activities such as games, movement, dance, drama and videography. Educational-related performers expanded the program to include interactive and participation programs supporting an interest in stories, events and places associated with the Mid-Hudson region. Many promotional activities supported the program including newsletters, blogs, online calendars, YouTube postings, school visits and program announcements through media outlets.
Project Outputs:
A total of 58 libraries participated in the children’s reading program and 40 libraries participated in the teen program, enrolling 8,151 children and 958 teens. Libraries reported that 63,255 books were read by children and 4,423 were read by teens over the summer period. Three professional programs for staff were held as part of the preparation for the 3,360 programs held throughout the Mid-Hudson region. The total attendance in summer reading exceeded 50,000. Twelve libraries received funding for the Flip Mino video camera project to stretch the creativity aspect of the summer reading theme.
Project Outcomes:
Librarians benefitted from the extensive training and resources provided. Children and teens actively participated in community activities to build literacy skills through creative endeavors, such as reader’s theater, buddy reads, and historical dramatization as part of the story exploration and quadricentennial themes associated with Hudson River celebrations throughout the Mid-Hudson region.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35018
Project Title: Project Number:
Mid-York 2009 LSTA Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1016
Library Name: Project Director:
Mid-York Library System Diana R. Norton
Phone Number: Email:
315-735-8328 2 dnorton@midyork.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$11,872 $23,872
Number of Persons Served:
29,991
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Reading development, Reading readiness, Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The summer reading program services offered by the Mid-York Library System afford libraries an opportunity to expand and improve library services through public outreach and programming to build their patron base and community support. The project capitalized on a variety of cultural activities and extended the literacy and reading interests of children, teens and families.
Project Activities/Methods:
Library staff attended workshops geared to explore the range of activities that could be incorporated in a summer reading initiative including puppetry, crafts, dramatizations and gaming. Mini-grants were distributed to member libraries to enhance the reading themes through activities such as "Under the Big Top," a circus event featuring stations to promote an interest in reading. A popular program, "Children Reading to Dogs" used the buddy system to engage small children in reading using dogs as story listeners. The website calendar tool "EventKeeper" was utilized by libraries to post regional summer reading events and activities.
Project Outputs:
A total of 5,308 children and 601 teens registered for summer reading through the member libraries of the Mid-York Library System. Children reported reading 8,806 titles. The program held 1,215 public programs and two professional development workshops. Many educational materials were developed and library partnerships with schools were strengthened as a result of 20 school visits and 32 website program announcements, along with numerous public service promotions through local media and business outlets. Additionally, the library system developed numerous game and activity sheets to recognize reading achievement. Artwork depicting children’s book characters and book titles were displayed at libraries throughout the system. 50% of the libraries reported increased circulation and 91% of participating libraries reported an increase in the number of books children borrowed over the summer months.
Project Outcomes:
With the support of manuals and reading materials, librarians engaged children and teens in the summer reading program, reporting significant strides in library card registration and community participation. Librarians valued the emphasis on planning and the variety of creative ideas afforded by regional workshops on managing a summer reading program for various age groups.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35019
Project Title: Project Number:
Mohawk Valley LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant Program 0070-09-1004
Library Name: Project Director:
Mohawk Valley Library System Sue Rokos
Phone Number: Email:
518-355-2010 srokos@mvls.info
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$6,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$35,000 $41,000
Number of Persons Served:
15,384
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens  
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The three-fold purpose supported by the Mohawk Valley Library System included support for the 23 member libraries and branches in carrying out the activities related to the New York State Library’s Statewide Summer Reading Program; strengthening child and family participation in literacy and reading activities; and providing additional emphasis on the online summer reading activities to build greater participation by children and teens.
Project Activities/Methods:
The program paired reading activities with art programs to build and sustain an interest in reading over the summer. Activities included story programs, book discussion, crafts, and film showings. Public service announcements and website promotion helped provide outreach activities to sustain an interest in library activities scheduled throughout the summer.
Project Outputs:
A total of 2,431 children and 622 teens registered for summer reading programs and read 10,061 and 2,725 titles respectively. A total of 605 public programs with an attendance of 14,705 were held throughout the summer. A workshop on programming for summer reading enabled librarians and staff to successfully implement the summer reading collaborative themes: "Be Creative at Your Library" and "Express Yourself." The programs were promoted through the use of online calendaring tools, online registration, and several summer reading websites, as well as print and media announcements.
Project Outcomes:
Using a survey, parents reported that their children’s interest and enjoyment of reading increased as a result of summer reading programs. Libraries extended their partnerships with regional cultural arts agencies to expand on the themes of "Be Creative" and "Express Yourself" at the library.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
At the Fort Plain Library, a program called "What’s the Scoop?" engaged children in making ice cream as a culminating activity. The children were very excited by the activity and the opportunity to use their reading and measuring skills to "create" a summer delectable.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35435
Project Title: Project Number:
Monroe County Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini Grant 0070-09-1012
Library Name: Project Director:
Monroe County Library System Patricia Uttaro
Phone Number: Email:
585-428-8045 puttaro@libraryweb.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$5,260 $17,260
Number of Persons Served:
42,650
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Library staff and volunteers, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Literacy Programs  
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Increasing recognition of summer reading programs and their value to school age children and teens provided the rationale for active programming with schools and community organizations, such as the Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) within the Monroe County service area.
Project Activities/Methods:
Mini-grants to member libraries enabled enrichment programming to occur throughout the city of Rochester, NY and surrounding areas in Monroe County. Classes were designed in cooperation with schools for students attending the local BOCES. A curriculum encompassing arts, writing and music was developed in support of the "Be Creative" theme. Many performance programs were designed to appeal to the English as a Second language (ESL) populations that have settled in this area. Additionally, a video clip competition for teens was developed as part of the reading challenge activities for this age group. Promotion for the program included the distribution of brochures, newspaper inserts, bookmarks, reading logs, and posters. More than 19,000 flyers were distributed. Peer reading, sidewalk art, and the making of student videos demonstrated the range of interactive reading and literacy activities conducted in this library system throughout the summer.
Project Outputs:
A total of 32 member libraries participated in the summer reading program with enrollment figures of 10,882 children and 1,561 teens. Attendance at all events grew to 42,650 participants, an increase of 3% over the previous year. A total of 19,396 materials were distributed to schools, business, and community organizations; 26 libraries utilized their website calendar to promote the activities for summer reading and linked to the summer reading websites sponsored by the New York State Library. A summer reading newspaper insert also promoted books and the summer reading theme.
Project Outcomes:
Engaging children and teens in reading and literacy activities resulted in the growth of the summer reading program. Libraries reported that attendance at their programs for summer reading were "the highest ever." Assisting ESL children with reading skills through peer mentoring programs allowed the libaries to develop relationships with a growing special population.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
"Most memorable is when a mother tells us that her reluctant son is finally learning to enjoy reading through the incentives of the summer reading program." (reported by a Library staff member).
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34539
Project Title: Project Number:
Monroe County Library Website Service Improvement 0070-10-0023
Library Name: Project Director:
Monroe County Library System Sally Snow
Phone Number: Email:
585-428-8051 Sally.Snow@libraryweb.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$11,055 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$40,750 $51,805
Number of Persons Served:
700,000
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Children, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Monroe County Library System accomplished several upgrades to its website to become more interactive and responsive to patrons and provide greater information on library calendars and activities through a corresponding presence on YouTube.
Project Activities/Methods:
Substantial training on podcasting, video editing, You Tube site development and other website additions enabled staff to re-engineer the library system website to include desired social networking components. A more complete library profile and news promotion vehicle has been established through YouTube and Twitter posts.
Project Outputs:
Substantial growth in the web traffic has resulted from having a more dynamic web page. Patrons, who utilize the web portal as their gateway to library services, are provided with a calendar of events, a Spanish-language portal, twitter feeds, YouTube showcases and a more intuitive search interface for library collections.
Project Outcomes:
Providing a splash page of library information and services within the Monroe County Library system has extended a sense of community for regional users. Patrons throughout the region can assess events and services, programs, and resources through the unified web portal.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34522
Project Title: Project Number:
Moving Forward: Making Web 2.0 Work for Libraries 0070-10-0032
Library Name: Project Director:
Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO) Dottie Hiebing
Phone Number: Email:
212-228-2320 dhiebing@metro.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$15,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$24,000 $39,000
Number of Persons Served:
5,500
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers, Urban populations  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services, Staff Development Education and Training, Virtual Library Services  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Following the launch of an expanded web presence, the Metropolitan New York Library Council continued to work with member libraries on utilization of their new website functionality designed for greater patron and staff interaction.
Project Activities/Methods:
Three workshops on project planning needed to enhance the system’s web services were held. An ongoing project review helped identify ways to create outreach to targeted users through the website.
Project Outputs:
As a result of new social networking opportunities, 355 people have "liked" to the METRO Facebook presence and 456 people are following METRO on Twitter. Web Design consultants are continuing to monitor and address the needs of the system’s website audiences to continue upgrading aspects of the site through the content management system.
Project Outcomes:
By creating and monitoring a more interactive web platform, libraries and librarians recognize the impact of social networking presence as tools for building participation in outreach and virtual library services. The addition of a Facebook presence has allowed ongoing conversations and feedback to take place regarding training or web issues.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35050
Project Title: Project Number:
Nassau Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1009
Library Name: Project Director:
Nassau Library System Renee McGrath
Phone Number: Email:
516-292-8920 renee@nassaulibrary.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$3,800 $15,800
Number of Persons Served:
102,291
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens  
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Nassau Library System included summer reading activities based on the local Long Island News in Education program and the themes of "BeCreative@YourLibrary" provided through recommended statewide summer reading resources. This enhanced summer reading program also built upon the Hudson River Quadricentennial celebrations based on the voyages of Henry Hudson and Samuel de Champlain. The program used these additional opportunities to strengthen leisure reading activities and to work with school media specialists to help build a wider audience and participation in summer reading activities.
Project Activities/Methods:
The Nassau Library System published a Summer Reading Supplement for publication in Newsday, Long Island’s largest newspaper. The supplement used the themes of the statewide summer reading program and provided a 16-page reading and game resource to assist families and children in selecting reading resources in fiction, nonfiction and biography, with specialized highlights for content in audio and e-book formats. Each page of this resource included word games, rhyming activities, games promoting reading and writing, as well as tips on how to write a story. The summer reading outreach to special population groups included announcements in the two largest weekly newspapers in Nassau County: the Long Island Herald and the Anton Community Newspapers. Materials in Spanish were directed to distinct clienteles in the Noticia Hispano Americana and in a weekly entitled The Community Journal, which serves African-Americans.
Project Outputs:
The above-mentioned materials were circulated to more than 200,000 homes in multiple separate editions. Additional promotions at 55 movie theaters through the creation of a post movie trailer resulted in an awareness-building campaign which reached approximately 180,000 Nassau residents. The program noted a significant increase in teen reading participation, reporting 3,418 additional teen participants, as compared to the previous program year. Overall, both children and teens read 10% more books in the program as compared with the previous program year. Several municipalities worked with school library media specialists to encourage participation in the summer reading program.
Project Outcomes:
The increase in participation in the Nassau Library System summer reading programs demonstrated the value of providing widespread community advocacy for library programs through highly accessible news publications with significant circulation. Combining new learning and participation activities with the theme of "Be Creative" resulted in a wealth of dance, art, and imaginative programs which increased summer reading participation. The broad creativity theme for the summer reading program helped libraries demonstrate their creativity in developing highly varied programs.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-36869
Project Title: Project Number:
New York Online Virtual Electronic Library (NOVELny)
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Loretta Ebert
Phone Number: Email:
518-473-1189 lebert@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$3,201,847 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $3,201,847
Number of Persons Served:
11,462,594
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services Statewide database licensing
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The purposes of the New York Online Virtual Electronic Library(NOVELny) project were to provide a source of high-quality, reliable, up-to-date information available only through licensing/subscription, to make information available to libraries that lack the resources to obtain it individually, and to level the playing field for all New Yorkers by permitting individuals to share access to the same resources regardless of economic, geographic, or physical circumstances.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library (NYSL) provided an electronic collection of books, journals, magazines, newspapers, encyclopedias, and other databases licensed on a statewide basis for free public access through local libraries and remote locations such as home, school, and office. In addition, the NOVELny project provided training in use of the databases and provided general policy oversight through the NOVELny Steering Committee composed of representatives from the library community and the State Library. The New York State Library NOVELny help desk registers libraries and refers them to the individual vendors for technical problems and database statistics.
Project Outputs:
In the period October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2010, the NOVELny databases program adjusted the number of databases available from fourteen to nine and introduced two new vendors to the NOVELny suite. This change preserved the breadth of content presented through NOVELny and permitted the addition of a long-requested general encyclopedia available to all eligible libraries in New York State. Eligible libraries include academic, public, school and special (not-for-profit) libraries. Over 5,500 libraries are registered for NOVELny and 342 people participated in 42 NOVELny training sessions. In this time period, 76 million searches were performed in NOVELny databases. The NOVELny Steering Committee met seven times. The NOVELny Statewide Education and Information Program, implemented during this reporting time period, was developed to increase the usage and visibility of the New York State Library’s NOVELny statewide database program. The marketing and communication plan for this project consisted of multiple activities involving different target audiences. During this reporting period, the formation of collaborative partnerships (NOVELny inserts were included in the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles driver license renewals and registrations) and the launch of a NOVELny Facebook page, contributed to a major increase in NOVELny usage.
Project Outcomes:
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Some comments received: A frustrated patron could not find a months-old article on the NY Post’s website. [The article was] easily found in the newspaper resource on NOVEL, and [I] was able to teach the patron as well. I teach [] health professionals who do not have free access to licensed databases in hospital/college libraries. They are very happy to hear about the free, full-text health resources available through NOVELny. I have social studies teachers who have students use [the encyclopedia] more often than their textbook. Excellent for both personal and professional research!
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35074
Project Title: Project Number:
New York Public Library LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1020
Library Name: Project Director:
New York Public Library Lillian Rusing
Phone Number: Email:
212-930-0031 lillian_rusing@nypl.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$13,500 $25,500
Number of Persons Served:
195,353
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Strengthen families and children Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The New York Public Library Summer Reading Program has been shaped by the combined efforts of the New York City Department of Education and all metro-area entities involved with literacy and education to sustain reading over the summer months as a preparation for school-based activities in the Fall.
Project Activities/Methods:
A combined reading list and reading log helped promote summer reading providing a constructive tool for use by families and children that promoted the "Be Creative" at your library theme. The summer reading program included celebrations at library locations throughout the boroughs in which children could complete their reading logs and enjoy the "creative" themes of programs mounted at individual library locations. The numerous science, art, puppet, dancing, singalong, magic and read-aloud programs included programs such as: The Art of Mime, Bid Daddy X and the Greeks, Butterfly Yellowgold, Latin Music Voyage, Letters to Harriet Tubman, Presley and Melody, and many other activities to engage children and teens in arts and age-appropriate literacy programs.
Project Outputs:
A total of 75,009 children and teens participated in the program, averaging five books per participant, with a total of 380,120 books read. This total represented an increase or more than 8% from the previous year. The consolidated reading list/reading log helped participants visualize their reading accomplishment. A total of 76 library locations held read-aloud programs, and 26 library locations held reading intensive board games; 63 locations held activities--including arts and crafts programs--that dovetailed with books held in library collections. For the teens, innovative gaming and computer exploration sessions were held to introduce the activities available through the summer reading website.
Project Outcomes:
Engaging readers in an array of interactive and entertaining activities supported children’s interest in summer reading over the summer. Using the well-developed reading logs as a multi-purpose tool for the program and the summer reading website helped engage youth and children in supplemental activities that made reading fun.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
One library reported that the summer reading celebration drew 30 teens to the Jefferson Market Library, where Michelle Zink, a noted author, read from her new book, The Prophecy of Sisters, while her teenage son performed music from the soundtrack developed for the audio or e-book market. In a discussion following the reading and performance, teens identified what makes a book, story or event appealing to teens. This conversation was invaluable to program planners in working with youth for future programs.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34597
Project Title: Project Number:
Newspaper Digitization Project 0070-10-0024
Library Name: Project Director:
Northern New York Library Network John Hammond
Phone Number: Email:
315-265-1119 john@nnyln.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$22,193 $32,818
Number of Persons Served:
4,401
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Sustain our cultural heritage
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Children, Rural populations  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects, Virtual Library Services Portals and related Web projects
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Newspaper Digitization Project expanded a digital archive, adding more regional news resources to the online digitized newspapers created at http://news.nnyln.net.
Project Activities/Methods:
The process of selecting and scanning more than 500,000 additional pages of content from 13 newspapers comprised the major work of this grant initiative. Newspapers from the Adirondack regions including Saranac Lake, Lowville, Lake Placid, Potsdam, Watertown, and Ogdensburg allowed for even greater access to historical records for this historic newspapers website. An online survey conducted in April 2010 provided feedback regarding the website’s convenience and accessibility.
Project Outputs:
A total of 512,800 pages were incorporated into the website, with web searches totaling 10,121,205 by 529,203 visitors. A total of 97% of the 79 survey respondents indicated their preference for web-based access to these newspaper resources.
Project Outcomes:
Free online access to local resources serving the research needs of individuals of all ages strengthened the changing role of libraries in preserving local history documentation for global consumption.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
"I am doing a huge project on the extended Kent family that came from New Jersey to New York in the 1700’s ... Though I started many years ago, I am now in a terrific collaboration with two other online researchers, writing a scholarly, well-sourced history of the family. I cannot tell you the help your site has been to us. Not having ever lived in New York, this has been a huge boon to me." A Website User
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35063
Project Title: Project Number:
Nioga Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant Program 0070-09-1021
Library Name: Project Director:
Nioga Library System Thomas Bindeman
Phone Number: Email:
716-434-6167 bindeman@nioga.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$1,500 $13,500
Number of Persons Served:
20,559
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Pre-school children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens, Literacy Programs Summer reading programs, Family literacy
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Nioga Library System created both professional development and patron programs to ensure the success and growth of its summer reading program. A total of 21 member libraries participated in wide-ranging activities to engage families, children and teens in leisure reading and literacy programs.
Project Activities/Methods:
Nioga libraries trained a storyteller to develop interactive storytimes in locales throughout the library system that encouraged children’s creativity. Many collaborations with community agencies and businesses helped increase the visibility of summer reading in communities throughout this largely rural area. Teen writing workshops and theater performances expanded on the broad creative theme chosen for the summer reading program initiative.
Project Outputs:
A total of 4,917 children and 731 teens registered for summer reading and more than 20,500 patrons participated in programs. More than 5,000 books were circulated to children and teens; 38 visiting artists provided varied programming to enrich the summer reading theme. A broad range of museum and arts programs also helped tie in their themes to extend the emphasis on information discovery and reading enrichment as part of the challenge of combining summer fun with learning opportunities over the summer.
Project Outcomes:
Libraries increased their visibility in the community by sustaining and improving partnerships with more than 70 community agencies and businesses that contributed support and publicity for summer reading programs. Teen participation increased as a result of more writing and creative activities that captured the creative spirit of the summer reading theme.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
One library staff member reported a great turnout for summer reading programs, saying: "Our YA circulation doubled; I believe this is due to the LSTA funding received to purchase materials for the program." A parent stated: "My kids really enjoyed the summer reading program this year. I got my teenage son to bring his sisters and brothers to the library, and he participated in the program too!"
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34591
Project Title: Project Number:
NioKids 0070-10-0014
Library Name: Project Director:
Nioga Library System Thomas Bindeman
Phone Number: Email:
716-434-6167 14 bindeman@nioga.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$2,396 $9,761
Number of Persons Served:
37,431
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects, Literacy Programs  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
By creating a "NioKids" website, the Nioga Library System promoted and provided E-resources and activity information throughout a three-county service area for children and their caregivers. This literacy-based project allowed patrons to select among activities throughout the system’s service area using the Niokids.org website. The Nioga Library System initiated this project to provide equitable access to media collections for entertainment and education throughout its service area, in response to a systemwide recognition of the financial need of its service population. It also provided related computing peripherals and opportunities for recreational activities for families at intergenerational library events.
Project Activities/Methods:
The NioKids website was launched in the Spring of 2009 at all 21 member library sites. Additionally, quality educational software for children under the age of nine (web resources) has been continually evaluated and updated to reflect changing seasons and local events. A monthly calendar of special events and area resources includes museum and other cultural arts programming throughout the area. E-resources were identified so that webtots, web kids, web tweens, and web grownups can easily access age-specific resources of high interest and learning value.
Project Outputs:
The principal output for the grant was the development and promotion of the www.niokids.org website. Evaluations of the site were conducted in both the preliminary investigation and development, as well as in the implementation phase of this project.
Project Outcomes:
Providing family literacy resources and events throughout the system enabled children to practice and develop reading and digital literacy skills, while exploring libraries and other cultural venues throughout the region through virtual access. This project strengthened family programming at libraries and provided improved and equitable access to entertainment and education resources. The NioKids initiative supports a fundamental priority of the system in offering lifelong learning opportunities for all Nioga Library System patrons with special attention to children under the age of nine.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35210
Project Title: Project Number:
North Country Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1023
Library Name: Project Director:
North Country Library System Emily Owen, Youth Services Coordinator
Phone Number: Email:
315-782-5540 eowen@ncls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$6,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$4,400 $10,400
Number of Persons Served:
16,736
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Reading development, Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
North Country used the LSTA funding to assist the 65 member libraries by providing mini-grants. The resulting mini-grant programs helped to generate positive publicity for libraries’ public programs and an awareness of the pivotal role of public libraries in supporting leisure reading and summer reading activities.
Project Activities/Methods:
Library staff attended a one-day workshop within their county to encourage collaboration and idea sharing on summer reading as preparation for staff in preparing their public programs. The programs--called "Team Up!"--encouraged idea sharing and partnerships with other agencies and educational performers who could broaden the scope of the reading program. Four area workshops were conducted by library system staff. Librarians also shared their enthusiasm with school library staff to engage students in summer reading programs prior to the end of the school year. The "Be Creative" theme was widely circulated with links to the summer reading website at the New York State Library and the North Country Library System summer reading programs site. Creativity was stressed in this year’s reading programs and resulted in many workshops that encouraged student writing and poetry.
Project Outputs:
A full 100% of the participating libraries promoted summer reading and 94% promoted their programs through multiple channels, including print, web, radio, Public Service Announcements, newspaper stories, and school visits. A total of 14,058 children, families and caregivers attended a total of 786 programs for children, and 2,618 teens attended a total of 186 programs geared for teens and ’tweens. More than 46% of the enrolled summer reading participants exceeded the program’s reading quota. Children reported reading 16,466 titles, while teens read 1,557 titles.
Project Outcomes:
Building an awareness of summer reading programs at public libraries remained a principal goal for North Country libraries. Libraries successfully implemented a host of public programs attracting families and children to be a part of the excitement generated by the "Be Creative" theme.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35218
Project Title: Project Number:
Onondaga Public Library LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1013
Library Name: Project Director:
Onondaga County Public Library Rosalind NaPier
Phone Number: Email:
315-435-1825 rnapier@onlib.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$11,957 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$141,325 $153,282
Number of Persons Served:
28,821
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens, Literacy Programs Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Providing summer reading programs gave libraries in the Onondaga County Public Library System the ability to support the reading skills of children and teens, while showcasing libraries’ fundamental outreach to children, youth and families as target groups in builiding new library consumers.
Project Activities/Methods:
The Onondaga County System stretched the LSTA grant resources by partnering with local business to provide reading logs and supplemental resources for participants, and focused on providing enrichment activities and family programs at each member library that included music, magic and "zoo" presentations that engaged a wide family audience. Additional project activities included book clubs, games such as Harry Potter "Jeopardy", drama clubs, crafts, and writing activities. Readers’ theater, a popular tradition in many summer reading programs, proved popular with children in grades 2-5 at the North Syracuse libraries. Promotion for summer reading programs was extensive and included library and school newsletters, school visits, direct mailings, Facebook promotion and local TV and newspaper announcements.
Project Outputs:
A total of 7,135 children and 1,276 teens registered for the Onondaga summer reading program and reported reading 89,946 and 8,336 books respectively. A total of 1,120 programs were conducted including two professional development workshops; 126 different print materials were produced in conjunction with the summer reading program, including calendars, bookmarks, brochures and reading lists.
Project Outcomes:
For each of the programs, attendees rated the success of the activities between 90% and 100% for "enjoyment" on a program questionnaire. Children demonstrated breakthrough reading achievement in many libraries, as evidenced by anecdotes of comprehension and reading based on reading selections.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Teens at the Mundy Branch Library discussed their interest in the first person narrative stories and diaries, and indiciated that seeing the world through other eyes was valuable. Teens at this library were inspired to start writing their own personal stories.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-37160
Project Title: Project Number:
Partnerships in Resource Sharing and Access
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Carol A. Desch
Phone Number: Email:
518-474-7196 cdesch@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$279,678 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $279,678
Number of Persons Served:
612,910
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services  
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?green check mark
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The New York State Library provided state-level leadership, planning, coordination, consultation, and support services to enable library systems and libraries to improve and expand upon resource sharing and access.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library worked with the 73 library systems and all types of libraries to expand partnerships to benefit resource sharing activities regionally, statewide and nationally. This included, but was not limited to: 1. Assisting library systems to increase resource sharing among all types of libraries through statewide and regional programs. 2. Partnering with large and small research institutions to improve resource sharing and preservation programs in order to expand the public’s access to unique library research materials. 3. Partnering with the nine regional multi-type reference and research library resources systems to improve resource sharing among libraries of all types and sizes. 4. Enhancing resource sharing among different types and sizes of libraries and library systems.
Project Outputs:
The State Library worked in partnership with nine regional automation projects with the reference and research resources systems to enable regional projects involving virtual catalogs, record enhancement, ILL, digitization, preservation and other resource sharing projects. These projects involve all types of libraries within New York State--public, school, academic and special libraries. In addition, the State Library worked in partnership with the nine regional reference and research library resources systems to expand the public’s access to the collections of college and university libraries and special libraries, including hospital and other medical libraries. This included 18 regional resource sharing projects for hospital and medical information and nine regional coordinated collection development plans including 202 academic libraries participants. State library staff also partnered with the library, museum and archival communities to produce a new statewide preservation plan in April 2010 http://www.oce.nysed.gov/imls08/swpresplan.pdf Altogether, State Library staff partnered in a total of 287 resources sharing projects. State Library staff made two site visits related to resource sharing activities. State Library staff also conducted three information events related to resource sharing that were attended by some 85 people.
Project Outcomes:
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35149
Project Title: Project Number:
Pioneer Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1017
Library Name: Project Director:
Pioneer Library System Ellen Reynolds
Phone Number: Email:
585-394-8260 ereynolds@pls-net.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $275
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$3,909 $16,184
Number of Persons Served:
27,369
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens  
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The summer reading program in the Pioneer Library System was designed to create a positive library experience, allowing families to experience library programs which encouraged reading as a fulfilling leisure activity.
Project Activities/Methods:
Preparation for the summer activities included staff planning and training workshops to prepare staff at the 42 library system member libraries for working with different age groups. Adult reading programs were introduced at ten libraries and teen programs were carried out at 16 libraries, using the themes from the national collaborative for summer reading programs. Culminating celebrations used ideas of "creative" expression such as mime, storytelling, ventriloquism, music, and crafts programs to involve participants. The importance of community building was prominent and led to many more social activities and celebrations at libraries, some of which featured camp-outs, movie marathons, Harry Potter events, dance-exercise events and ice cream socials. A Fall follow-up evaluation workshop enabled librarians to track the success of their varied reading initiatives and generate ideas for the next year’s reading programs.
Project Outputs:
A total of 4,696 children and 653 teens registered for the summer reading program and reported reading a total of 27,881 titles; 209 library program activities were scheduled and additional unstructured reading activities were also introduced. The program was promoted extensively through newspaper, radio, television and in partnership with local organizations and businesses. Libraries conducted on-site school visits in 28 communities. A "Keep Your Kids" reading report card sticker enticed students and parents to participate in public library summer activities in 26 school districts, along other branded products for school librarians to distribute prior to the end of the school year.
Project Outcomes:
Sustaining the use of the library by the target populations for summer reading programs was highly successful. 82% of the students participating in the summer reading program in the Pioneer Library System had participated in prior years, which demonstrated that students themselves were drawn to public library summer reading initiatives. 67% of parents participating in an evaluation of the program indicated that their children read more during the summer as a result of the library efforts to host summer reading activities. Creating programs for children, families and adult readers at the library provided "a fun place" to spend time, an outcome stressed by reading advocates as a target goal to encourage leisure reading.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
A popular activity at Pioneer Library System was reading to therapy dogs and the opportunity to have unstructured conversations about books in display or on the librarian’s desk.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34665
Project Title: Project Number:
Practical Digitizing: Decisions, Details and Development 0070-10-0028
Library Name: Project Director:
South Central Regional Library Council Mary Carol Lindbloom
Phone Number: Email:
607-273-9106 mclindboom@scrlc.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$11,000 $21,625
Number of Persons Served:
55
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects, Staff Development Education and Training, Technology Infrastructure Digitization, Digital library projects
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Activities in this training program were developed in conjunction with a consultant and web developer and offered as online tutorials. Additionally, members of the Library Council continued to support the The Tools of History (TofH website developed previously with LSTA funds http://www.toolsofhistory.org/) through site visits and technical support for digitization projects.
Project Activities/Methods:
Six workshops encompassing topics of copyright, scanning, digital imaging, photoshop, and tagging with metadata elements provided the basis of a curriculum in digitization for all South Central Resource Library Council (SCRLC) staff. Larger topics on project management, metadata, scanning, copyright, and collection management/sustainability were woven into the workshops with the assistance of invited speakers. A tutorial on digitizing resources was added to the developing website Tools of History (TofH). A culminating workshop provided a capstone experience--allowing all participants to exchange and share their experience and techniques on assembling digital projects. The project was continuously monitored for relevance and interest by users through qualitative feedback and evaluation surveys.
Project Outputs:
A total of 17 member libraries and organizations participated in this project and 12 members actively engaged in adding collections to the website. A total of 812 digital objects were created and 36 staff members attended hands on practical training. Evaluation surveys measuring confidence levels in skills relative to the digitization process showed an average gain in confidence of 30% as compared to pre-workshop assessments. All participating staff reported successful use of unique digital resources as measured at 6 weeks after training. Additional skills inventories will be monitored at six-month and year-end post training intervals
Project Outcomes:
The majority of program participants (71%) successfully created digital objects to conserve in the Tools of History repository with little or no assistance from SCRLC staff. Staff from member libraries agreed that the training had a positive impact on program planning and decision-making for their libraries or cultural institutions. Researchers, educators and end users report successful use of the Tools of History site for teaching and life-long learning.
Other Results:
Unanticipated outcomes were reported in this project. The project created an online tutorial allowing library staff to learn the process for delivering continuing education programs in a distance learning environment. Using alternative training models may lead to more one-on-one and group training endeavors in online environments.
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35436
Project Title: Project Number:
Public Library Administration and Management Program 0070-10-0001
Library Name: Project Director:
Queens Borough Public Library Thomas Galante
Phone Number: Email:
718-990-0794 tgalante@queenslibrary.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$21,400 $20,000
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$22,600 $64,000
Number of Persons Served:
25
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training Library science education and skills, Management skills, Technical skills
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This training initiative exposed Queens Borough Public Librarians to current ideas and resources to help determine the impact of changing library services and technologies in libraries. Additionally, the training provided strategies librarians could utilize in interacting with patrons and staff in a changing service environment. The project emphasized legal, personnel, customer service, telecommunications, automated systems and facilities management issues in a public library setting.
Project Activities/Methods:
Twenty-five librarians with at least two years of experience were selected to participate in this five-part training initiative. Case studies were used in conjunction with other management tools, such as personnel handbooks and grant management policy guides, to help determine management decisions concerning a wide variety of patron, staff, and facility issues and interactions. Topics such as gaming in libraries and the management of additional teen programs in libraries, as well as the use of non-librarians to support activities programs, provided the basis for active discussions of issues librarians have faced in reaching out to a broader public in new service capacities. A survey was administered after each training session to evaluate the perceived value for participants.
Project Outputs:
Twenty-five librarians from ten branch libraries in Queens participated in the workshops. A total of 98% of the program participants reported that the course was excellent or very good in a satisfaction survey; 21 bibliographies, lesson plans, and course documents were prepared.
Project Outcomes:
Active discussions concerning current dilemmas and situation management in the branch libraries of the Queens Borough Public Library strengthened librarians’ ability to maintain and improve client satisfaction in providing varied and changing patron services. Participants recognized that management decisions impacting service operations required careful evaluation prior to implementation to prevent adverse response/reaction by various affected stakeholders. A partnership with Long Island University infused the training with emerging topics in library service and personnel development.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35234
Project Title: Project Number:
Queens Borough Public Library LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1022
Library Name: Project Director:
Queens Borough Public Library Denise Clark
Phone Number: Email:
718-990-8551 denise.clark@queenslibrary.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $10,000
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$10,000 $32,000
Number of Persons Served:
97,364
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Queens Borough Public Library used the LSTA funds to support reading comprehension and writing activities using arts and crafts activities to stimulate imaginative programs in 62 community libraries. The program demonstrated the collaboration among borough library programs, strengthening the visibility of the program through shared core reading lists distributed throughout the metropolitan New York area.
Project Activities/Methods:
Queens Borough children and youth were exposed to many, varied program activities where writing or performing promoted active participation in the program. Drama events, plays, puppet shows, quiltmaking, online blogs and cooking activities comprised some of the wide-ranging programs that were introduced. A Queens Borough "Teen Book Slam" was continued from the previous year, featuring an online book discussion program and trivia contest. Librarians and staff were offered one professional development workshop. The program was coordinated with the Brooklyn and New York Public Libraries, using a common registration portal. Cablevision and Mets telecasts promoted summer reading activities. Publications created to promote the program included children and teen booklists in English and in Spanish, a Baby-Toddler Booklist, and reading pads. Library staff also conducted outreach visits to schools.
Project Outputs:
A total of 35,894 children and 9,201 teens registered for the summer reading program. Children reported reading 270,993 books, while teens read 26,804 titles. A total of 253,000 copies of all materials were distributed through schools, day care, and community after-school programs throughout the borough. Online access to the Performers and Programs Database (created with LSTA funds several years ago) was made available to libraries’ webpages as a resource for program activities. 75% of teens in the book slam program completed all the recommended books, and the number of teens who read all the recommended titles increased by 33% over the prior year.
Project Outcomes:
Teens and young adult participants in the summer reading program engaged in a wide variety of performance and writing activities, helping the system to raise the number of active partipants in this program by 10%. 75% of teens in the book slam program completed all the recommended books, and the number of teens who read all the recommended titles increased by 33% over the prior year. Working with other metropolitan New York library systems, libraries were able to present a unified, citywide reading program that would allow children and teens to better share their reading experiences.
Other Results:
As a result of a drama workshop at the Woodhaven Community Library, children created a video called "The Haunted Library" which was posted on YouTube.
Anecdotal Info:
Two participants from the Hollis Community Library read over 100 books each. The Children’s Librarian recognized their achievement and provided each with a donated IPOD (no LSTA funds used) at a celebration marking the end of summer reading.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35219
Project Title: Project Number:
Ramapo Catskill Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-09-1010
Library Name: Project Director:
Ramapo Catskill Library System Randall Enos
Phone Number: Email:
845-343-1131 e renos@rcls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$19,184 $31,184
Number of Persons Served:
56,524
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Ramapo Catskill Library System activities that promoted reading included visual literacy initiatives as part of its summer reading program. To support the creative theme, RCLS libraries engaged in many arts-oriented programs for children and teens.
Project Activities/Methods:
As preparation for the summer reading initiative, libraries attended a planning workshop focused on idea sharing and collaboration which included hands-on demonstrations of activities that could be implemented with children and teens. The workshop allowed libraries to adapt and plan for programs for both children and teens that captured the "Be Creative" theme, including non-fiction reading choices such as Learning to Draw and Learning to Cook that capitalized on popular book titles in library collections. A wide variety of book talks, book reviews, book discussions, and storytimes reinforced reading. The focus on improving literacy included interpretations through artwork, posters, visualizations, and video production. Mini grants for performers, flip cams, and special projects were distributed to member libraries.
Project Outputs:
A total of 10,003 children and 1,453 teens registered for summer reading programs and recorded reading 76,418 and 4,820 books respectively. A total of 2,525 programs were conducted in conjunction with summer reading. A wide variety of book lists, bookmarks, and announcements were prepared to promote summer reading.
Project Outcomes:
Librarians expressed strong satisfaction with the professional development workshop opportunity on summer reading as measured by a questionnaire. Participation by teens increased considerably at many libraries, as measured by program attendance. The library system reported that allotted spaces for program attendance were inadequate to support demand at many programs for both children and teens. Intergenerational activities generated by reading buddies throughout the system expanded children’s awareness of new and different reading choices.
Other Results:
Partnerships with community centers attracted new Spanish-speaking families to the library. English as a Second Language programs were also incorporated into the summer reading program.
Anecdotal Info:
The teen librarian at the Moffat Library of Washingtonville reported that "We were able to bring in an audience that we haven’t seen in the library (teenage boys age 11-17)".
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34642
Project Title: Project Number:
Reaching New Horizons 0070-10-0025
Library Name: Project Director:
Rochester Regional Library Council Deborah Emerson
Phone Number: Email:
585-223-7570 demerson@rrlc.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$10,625 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$9,200 $19,825
Number of Persons Served:
500
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Provide tools for the future
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training, Technology Infrastructure  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This project entailed two primary components: the development and member-driven use of a content management system, and a training program engaging leaders and staff in workshops on new library trends. The grant activities blended both leader and staff training, and provided workshops in response to a regional needs assessment survey. The adoption of new website technologies improved communication among member libraries and expanded the continuing education opportunities of participant members throughout the Rochester Regional Library Council (RRLC).
Project Activities/Methods:
The grant project contained a blend of online and onsite training to remove barriers associated with traveling to an offsite location for training, while still affording scheduled interaction with the presenters. A leadership institute was conducted over six months involving several library system partners in the greater Rochester and Buffalo regions. Courses on logic models, copyright and current technologies were also held. The content management software allowed members to post information on training events and a "What’s New?" column, as well as an online archive of the "Linking Libraries" newsletter. The new website with collaborative input and Web 2.0 components can be viewed at http://rrlc.org.
Project Outputs:
A total of 9 workshops serving 353 participants were held during the project, and 15 regional librarians participated in the leadership institute over a six-month timespan, culminating in a certificate of completion. Based on a needs survey, the system implemented a content management system incorporating new Web 2.0 components and collaboration. Partnerships were created or sustained with the Western New York Library Resources Council and two other organizations, the Non-Profit Works and Net Results. User surveys determined a strong positive evaluation for those who participated in the online classes, with 92.6% of respondents indicating they would recommend these classes to a colleague.
Project Outcomes:
Alternative forms of training and communication and online programming proved successful in training regional library staff and leadership. Training partnerships with external non-profit agencies helped librarians learn new project management and use of web development software such as MovieMaker, PhotoStory, and Audacity to continue to provide more relevant content for the system’s website.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34516
Project Title: Project Number:
Revving Up Digital Media Services 0070-10-0002
Library Name: Project Director:
Chautauqua-Cattaraugus Library System Anne D. Plyler
Phone Number: Email:
716-484-7135 aplyler@cclslib.org or cway@cclslib.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$13,883 $21,248
Number of Persons Served:
1,399
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Provide tools for the future
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Children, Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Providing access to resources in mobile formats represents a shift in patrons’ access and use of library resources supported through this inititative. By providing training and new digital audiobook collections, both patrons and staff adapted to new resources and digital access to online resources.
Project Activities/Methods:
The library system created a user survey to assess the need of digital players and resources prior to the purchase of new resources.
Project Outputs:
Eighty-five staff from member libraries participated in the decision process and training on a new mobile book format; 27 of the system’s 36 member libraries were represented during the year; 21 additional training sessions for patrons and 12 workshop classes drew 269 participants. Approximately 634 unique library users and 425 new patrons began using these new outreach services. A total of 91.3 % of the respondents from an online survey indicated that the digital media provided a new source of reading and entertainment.
Project Outcomes:
Both library automation and book downloads to Mp3 players provided new access to resources using digital formats within the system. Utilization of library resources increased and the alternative online access to these resources helped to accommodate the varying lifestyle and worklife schedules of patron groups in this library system.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Several comments demonstrated the effectiveness of the digital book training and access initiatve: "I read a lot more that I did previously." "I saved time and learned to use an Mp3 player." "I can listen at times when it’s not possible to read or complete other tasks at the same time." Those with visual impairments also were better served. One such user commented: "Reading became difficult due to tired eyes...I can enjoy books again."
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34517
Project Title: Project Number:
School Librarians as 21st Century Leaders 0070-10-0006
Library Name: Project Director:
Erie 2-Chautauqua-Cattaraugus BOCES SLS Susan M. Bartle
Phone Number: Email:
716-672-4371 sbartle@e2ccb.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$150,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$125,000 $275,000
Number of Persons Served:
1,371
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training Technical skills
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
A total of 41 school library systems collaborated to share training, information, and best practices with librarians, teachers, and administrators to continually improve library services in P-16 learning environments. Three specific concentrations--literacy, leadership, and technology--were selected as focal points to correspond with New York State Education Department initiatives and goals for 21st Century Learners. Improved communication channels such as RSS feeds, wikis, blogs, and webcasts were established and promoted to school personnel and other targeted partners that helped shape future programs slated for presentation during the project time period. Topics included were Collaborative Leadership, Reading and the Elementary Media Specialist, Reading and the Secondary School Specialist, and some courses from the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Advocacy Institute. School librarians began to develop plans of service improvement based on the programs and webinars conducted during the year.
Project Activities/Methods:
Improved communication channels such as RSS feeds, wikis, blogs, and webcasts were promoted to school personnel and other targeted partners to ensure collaboration among media specialists. A School Library System Association portal was expanded. Training Topics developed for this project included Collaborative Leadership, Instructional Design for Digital Literacy, Reading and Gender. Supporting Elementary Media Specialist, Reading and the Secondary School Specialist, and courses from Simmons College. Regional institutes on technology, literacy and library programming were presented to library media specialists and school personnel. Evaluations of the workshops were conducted. Professional development resources were added to the system’s collection.
Project Outputs:
A total of 904 media specialists attended 28 scheduled workshops along with additional staff, yielding a total attendance figure of 1,371. A total of 1,121 participants completed evaluation surveys rating the training in many categories, including practicality of information. In this category, 87% of respondents, felt that the workshops were good to excellent.
Project Outcomes:
This project supported New York State Education Department initiatives to improve technology standards in teaching and learning and school leadership in the use of technology to support digital literacy. School media and teaching staff learned to use new communication channels to sustain continuous improvement in the delivery of content and technology practices in their work with professional administrators, teachers, student populations and colleagues in all 41 school library systems. Online communication tools were developed to sustain school library leaders and disseminate best practices in teaching, learning and technology implementation. Training media specialists in new technologies and communication strategies extended the learning potential of these workshops to an estimate of 4,250 teachers, who could implement these same teaching strategies employed in their classrooms. As a result of excellent staff participation in grant activities, school media specialists developed their ability to involve students and teachers in literacy projects. The digital repository of online course resources will continue to serve the school media specialists and teachers in their design of instructional strategies for literacy education.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35229
Project Title: Project Number:
Southern Adirondack LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini-Grant 0070-10-1001
Library Name: Project Director:
Southern Adirondack Library System Sara Dallas
Phone Number: Email:
518-584-7300 dallas@sals.edu
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$6,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$6,000 $12,000
Number of Persons Served:
19,067
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Reading development, Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Southern Adirondack Library System set educational and recreational activities as a priority in the summer reading program to encourage children and families to read throughout the summer, in recognition of research supporting the value of sustained leisure reading as preparation for the improved student performance upon return to school in the next term.
Project Activities/Methods:
The library system supported 34 public libraries with funding from the mini-grant and prepared library staff in youth services for the summer reading program by holding a featured hands-on workshop using graphic novels to promote literacy. A noted guest speaker with an extensive background in young adult programs facilitated the workshop. Libraries were encouraged to develop community partners to increase attendance at summer reading programs, especially those that could support the "Be Creative" theme. Materials printed using funding from the grant included bookmarks and reading logs.
Project Outputs:
A total of 5,189 children and 750 teens registered for summer reading programs throughout the Southern Adirondack Library System, reading 45,136 and 6,720 books respectively. A total of 734 summer reading program activities were held with 19,067 participants. A significant number of educational activities were held to sustain an interest in the program, including 17 school visits, 31 newspaper announcements or stories, 26 community or business organization postings, and 7 TV/radio media spots.
Project Outcomes:
33 libraries (97%) created collaborative partnerships within the community for summer reading programs that will continue to be a source of support for literacy/reading/library programs in the future. 82.7% of participating libraries indicated that the graphic novel workshop would contribute to improved library services for teens in the upcoming year. More than 50% of the member libraries were able to develop a relationship with a creative partner in line with the program’s selected theme to build a synergy of activities in the arts.
Other Results:
The Fort Edward Library created a Heritage Day float with support from children using Native American motifs and the "Be Creative Theme" from the reading program, which won first place for the "Best Appearing Float" and was pictured in the regional daily newspaper.
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35235
Project Title: Project Number:
Southern Tier Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini Grant 0070-09-1014
Library Name: Project Director:
Southern Tier Library System Lorie Brown
Phone Number: Email:
607-962-3141 brownl@stls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$5,795 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$5,120 $10,915
Number of Persons Served:
26,980
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
In the Southern Tier Library System, the summer reading program provided an opportunity for staff to review library services for children and youth, to try new programs, and to reinforce the role of leisure reading in academic achievement. Additionally, the program sought to increase partnerships and awareness of reading program activities available through community libraries.
Project Activities/Methods:
Library staff participated in five regional workshops to evaluate multiple facets of their reading programs, including reader advisory tools and awareness of online resources. The trainings also helped libraries share easily replicable programming ideas and create a benchmark to work toward in planning new services for children and youth. An evaluation survey, designed to monitor progress toward benchmarks, was developed and used. Outreach to school and community organizations helped to promote the summer reading program. A unifying theme for displays called The Pink Refrigerator Project, based on the book by Tim Egan, helped many of the 49 library outlets to create a prominent summer reading display in libraries that sustained interest in and curiosity about summer reading program activities. Public programs were held at 48 member libraries.
Project Outputs:
A total of 3,266 children and 418 teens registered for summer reading programs in member libraries in the Library System, reading 18,202 and 1,769 books respectively. A total of 1,057 programs, including five professional development programs, were offered with a total attendance of 26,980 participants. Twenty-six different print resources were created for distribution throughout the system including handouts, bookmarks, publicity flyers and resource lists. Two public television service announcements were aired and many radio outlets also promoted the program. Twenty-five outreach visits to schools helped to build an awareness of the reading lists and create enthusiasm among students to sustain reading achievement in the summer months. Several Ready-to-Go or Out-of-the-Box activities helped libraries deliver ongoing, replicable programs using available stories and props.
Project Outcomes:
Libraries and staff were encouraged to assess library services for children and youth by creating benchmarks to assess their progress toward new service goals. By creating a benchmark of new community partnerships (one common goal), libraries were able to promote the library as a valuable community resource. Libraries recognized the need to reevaluate and update realia, book displays, and book club ’meetings’ to incorporate newer technology and social media online to address the changing use and access patterns of their clientele.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34512
Project Title: Project Number:
Spanish Language Outreach 0070-10-0007
Library Name: Project Director:
Brooklyn Public Library Sharron Lahey
Phone Number: Email:
718-230-2013 s.lahey@brooklynpublic library.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$21,400 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$362,979 $384,379
Number of Persons Served:
4,096
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services to persons having difficulty using libraries 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen communities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Non/limited English speaking persons  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Outreach Services Services to ethnic and cultural groups
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The purpose of the project was to conduct a comprehensive community needs assessment to help develop a program plan for effectively rolling out a mobile Internet-enabled bookmobile called a Bibliobus, to serve the underserved Spanish language populations in Brooklyn.
Project Activities/Methods:
A project director, who is also the Outreach Coordinator, was hired and materials were purchased. The Bibliobus, which began service in early 2009, is stocked with over 2,200 Spanish language books, CDs and DVDs for patrons of all ages and all reading levels. It visits at least seven locations each week.
Project Outputs:
The Bibliobus circulated 6,058 items to 1,030 patrons. The Outreach Coordinator conducted 121 education programs to 2,216 Spanish-speaking patrons at library branches, schools, and daycare centers.
Project Outcomes:
Outreach was increased to Brooklyn’s underserved Spanish-speaking community, a group that constitutes a large segment of the borough’s population. The bookmobile model allowed the library to bring materials directly to residents in Spanish-speaking neighborhoods
Other Results:
Due to the success of this project, the Brooklyn Public Library has decided to continue the program beyond the grant funding period, absorbing the costs of the Outreach Coordinator into its personnel budget and is planning to seek additional funding from corporate, foundation, and government funding.
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34563
Project Title: Project Number:
Staff Development for Change, Innovation and Leadership 0070-10-0022
Library Name: Project Director:
Nassau Library System Elizabeth Olesh
Phone Number: Email:
516-292-8920 eolesh@nassaulibrary.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,161 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$19,000 $31,161
Number of Persons Served:
156
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Provide tools for the future
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Staff Development Education and Training  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This library staff training program emphasized the efficiency and penetration of new communication vehicles, their ability to target select audiences and to motivate libraries to adopt Web 2.0 tools and new media for outreach and news dissemination within Nassau County libraries.
Project Activities/Methods:
Six highly interactive workshops led by organizational consultants were held. The programs centered on how newer technology applications have been used and their effectiveness in providing and managing innovative library services. Such workshops included such topics as: gadgets, mobile access, library futures, designing the digital experience and new media channels for libraries. Guest speakers of national stature led these workshops in an effort to help libraries build and assess their Web 2.0 journey. Evaluations conducted after each program via an online survey confirmed that hands-on small workshops helped staff benefit from community impact programs at local libraries.
Project Outputs:
A total of 253 staff attended these workshops. Over the project period, 620 participants attended training which represented 125% of the targeted goal for this training. Qualitative evaluation comments reflected participants’ awareness of Web 2.0 technologies, but stressed the importance of team-building and the motivation to experiment with new media that the training afforded participants. New branch library pages in YouTube, Facebook and Twitter created as a result of the training have provided the content for greater outreach and audience penetration in the user community.
Project Outcomes:
Library directors and staff targeted in this training initiative learned new technologies and their best use in library branches, noting that YouTube and Twitter feeds have become popular alternate news sources for patrons in the Nassau Library System. Creating new environments for the dissemination of library news has allowed the work and popularity of library programs to be better disseminated throughout the Nassau Library System community.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34598
Project Title: Project Number:
Starburst Accessibility Project 0070-10-0017
Library Name: Project Director:
Onondaga County Public Library Mark Allnatt
Phone Number: Email:
315-435-1876 mallnatt@ocpl.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$11,055 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$18,481 $29,536
Number of Persons Served:
66
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services to persons having difficulty using libraries 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide tools for the future Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
People with special needs Blind and visually-impaired persons, Deaf and hearing-impaired persons
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Outreach Services, Software and Equipment Special needs services, Adaptive technology
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary?green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
In this project, the Onondaga County Public Library responded to the need for assistive computer technology to serve some 2,200 residents with vision impairment. The program provided additional adaptive hardware and software to libraries strategically located throughout their service area. Working with this special population helped to accommodate the tremendous growth in the demand and use of adaptive equipment, which was formerly located at only one downtown library. Additionally, the project helped this special patron group browse the online catalog for the library’s large print book collection, various types of media, and downloadable content, which improved services for this target population.
Project Activities/Methods:
ZoomText and Jaws software were installed on designated computers in select libraries. Staff and volunteer training was provided to support the use of these assistive tools in libraries designated as recipients of the adaptive devices. Patrons were encouraged to try the adaptive equipment in the new locations by staff and through program announcements printed and distributed throughout the library system.
Project Outputs:
Fifteen staff members received training to assist patrons in the use of the new ZoomText and Jaws software followed by eleven additional workshops in five additional libraries. In total, 9 branch libraries and one community organization received training for a total of 46 trainees; 21 end-users, (patrons with disabilities) also received special training or assistance in the use of the software for reading Braille or other resources. Several Reference notebooks were distributed to each participating library. Additional self-paced learning modules on audio cassette were purchased to introduce the features of the software. The library’s website (www.onlib.org) was updated so patrons could learn about the service enhancements. A partner organization, the National Adult Education Organization, agreed to install additional adaptive equipment at fifteen workstations in their training center at a local shopping center to enable seniors and low-vision adult populations to practice and apply the skills learned in their adult education classes. The program was well publicized through the newsletters of various participating libraries.
Project Outcomes:
Serving a relatively large disabled population in multiple locations using adaptive equipment has provided new avenues of access to library services for patrons with handicapping conditions. Librarians and staff have become more responsive to the needs of elderly and sight-impaired patrons and the services available to patrons through the library and other community resources.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
A library reported that a mother and son, both with vision disabilities, have become regular library customers, enabling the student to finish his coursework and prepare school reports. The new equipment has helped the student access library resources and satisfy curriculum requirements for his school projects. Another library reported the steady use of the new equipment by a young man disabled in an accident who could now get to a library location using a motorized wheelchair to use the newly installed adaptive equipment.
Exemplary Reason:
The "Starburst Accessibility Project" is a well-organized project that meets the needs of a special population in its service area.

Project Code: 2009-NY-35433
Project Title: Project Number:
Stepping Back 0070-10-0021
Library Name: Project Director:
Westchester Library System Terry L. Kirchner
Phone Number: Email:
914-231-3223 tkirchner@wlsmail.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$11,055 $5,564
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$10,782 $27,401
Number of Persons Served:
529,000
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers, Seniors  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services Community information services
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Westchester Library System’s project evaluated its online presence and website usability with patrons and staff while upgrading components of the integrated library system throughout their 38 member libraries and their separate websites.
Project Activities/Methods:
The project established focus groups to evaluate web access, catalog access, information display, and other functionalities sought by public service staff and patrons. By assessing user perceptions and use patterns, the system established project initiatives to offer a common platform interface and federated search capabilities to help patrons complete queries more successfully. An in-depth survey was developed and distributed to different segments of the library population. Users’ experiences with such features as online tutorials, keyword search lists, inter-library loan screens, listings of similar holdings, and right-hand truncation of search terms, as well as Web 2.0 features, were examined. Librarians were polled to assess keyword searching, inter-library loan searching and other features of the system.
Project Outputs:
The library system investigated numerous aspects of searching using the online catalog to determine which training and search methods were most successful for key populations. Results for more than 20 catalog options were analyzed. The core functions of an online catalog were assessed and priortized as action items for future improvements. The bibliographic functions of the catalog and availability of holdings remained paramount in the search experience. Recommendations for other catalog functionalities were determined as a result of the survey completed by library staff.
Project Outcomes:
Librarians expressed an interest in upgrading aspects of the library catalog as a research tool while public patrons underscored the finding capacity as a core functionality in their use of an online catalog. The Library System gained knowledge and understanding of the search experience by multiple target groups to improve the portal and web presence of its integrated library system.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34718
Project Title: Project Number:
Suffok Historic Newspapers 0070-10-0004
Library Name: Project Director:
Suffolk Cooperative Library System David Concar
Phone Number: Email:
631-286-1600 1334 dconcar@suffolk.lib.ny.us
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$13,700 $6,850
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$5,000 $25,550
Number of Persons Served:
769,381
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 1. Statewide Electronic Access to Information Resources
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas Sustain our cultural heritage
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Adults, Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Digitization and Digital Library Projects  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Member libraries of the Suffolk Cooperative Library System selected local publications containing Long Island history and information for the digitization initiative, Suffolk Historic Newspapers, based on a needs assessment of the local history represented in that online collection to date. The scope of the project was expanded to include additional news sources: The Patchogue Advance, The Mid-Island Mail and The Corrector.
Project Activities/Methods:
The microfilm records of newspapers selected for digitization were evaluated by staff trained as part of the initiative. Staff training took place at seven libraries and one historical society. Additional public presentations on the Suffolk Historic Newspaper project were conducted at five libraries and two genealogical societies. New promotional materials were added to the website (http://shn.suffolk.lib.ny.us) and the public was invited to several demonstration promotions to advance the use of the Suffolk Historical Newspaper archive. Public user and library staff evaluations were conducted to assess the usefulness and benefits of this collection. Outreach to schools was increased and has become a regular component of the program’s outreach activities. Promotional flyers were revised to include peer training activities.
Project Outputs:
In total 73,485 pages from five newspapers were added to the collection with coverage beginning in 1822. A total of 63 public school librarians attended workshops to introduce the archive to school libraries and populations. Usage, as measured by website visits, has shown steady increases through all the project years, and now averages 2,489 visits per month. Evaluations conducted with various user populations provided valuable information on users’ site preferences. Measures of scope, usability, search satisfaction and image quality were all positive. Respondents are continuing to seek greater content and a more complete historical record.
Project Outcomes:
The targeted audience has demonstrated a growing interest in the newspaper archive as demonstrated by the upturn in web statistics and user reports.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35286
Project Title: Project Number:
Suffolk Cooperative Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini Grant 0070-09-1007
Library Name: Project Director:
Suffolk Cooperative Library System Barbara Moon
Phone Number: Email:
631-286-1600 bmoon@suffolk.lib.ny.us
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$60,000 $72,000
Number of Persons Served:
159,913
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Suffolk Library System’s program supported the summer reading activities for children and teen programming at 57 public libraries, with a concentration on providing summer reading inserts in the Newsday in Education publications used by schools to reach children and youth in their homes.
Project Activities/Methods:
The outreach component of the Suffolk Library System program enabled children and families to receive a 16-page insert with library locations, reading lists, reading activities, genre guides, in addition to a select guide to "Great Reads" that included ebook and audiobook selections. This guide supported literacy and writing activities for the intended audience, with a focus on the summer reading theme of "Be Creative@Your Library." An annual teen reading event, The Battle of the Books, was held at a central Suffolk location. Thirty-seven libraries sent teams to participate in the activities and competition, with 281 contestants and more than 100 student coaches and coordinators. Materials were purchased to facilitate the creation of die-cut signage and displays for all member libraries. Collaboration with Nassau Library System libraries resulted in the distribution of similar reading resource inserts in the neighboring Nassau County’s schools, public libraries and newspapers.
Project Outputs:
A total of 38,512 children and 6,050 teens registered for summer reading in Suffolk County libraries and reported reading 324,637 and 25,286 book titles, respectively. Publications were distributed to 145,000 households and daycare or summer program facilities through school libraries at over 200 schools. Ninety-one visits were made by public librarians to promote the summer reading program at area elementary, middle and high schools. More than 400 teens and their families attended the jeopardy-style games for the Battle of the Books event, using the library as a regular meeting place to write quiz questions and to practice for the actual event. The newspaper insert circulation was increased by 41% from the previous year, reaching many more schools. In 2009, 232 school librarians received direct mailings, an increase of 68% over the previous year.
Project Outcomes:
The summer reading program received widespread support from school librarians, increasing community awareness and building support for summer reading as a school-based activity in partnership with public libraries. The competition for teens in the Battle of the Books event strengthened family participation in reading for understanding and provided a new family leisure reading participation event: the "Winter Competition" in which 17 advanced teams demonstrated their book knowledge. This event fostered reading as a year-round activity for children, teens and families.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-36941
Project Title: Project Number:
Summer Reading at New York Libraries
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Cassandra Artale
Phone Number: Email:
518-474-1479 cartale@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$224,141 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $224,141
Number of Persons Served:
1,491,477
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Library staff and volunteers, Statewide public  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Reading development
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
“Summer Reading at New York Libraries” focuses on three main purposes: 1) improving literacy and academic performance by promoting reading during the summer months, 2) improving children’s access to library materials and activities which will encourage them to become lifelong library users, and 3) fostering a love of reading for young people through public library programs and services. The New York State Library coordinates this statewide program to assist public libraries and library systems in promoting and enhancing participation in local public library summer reading programs. This has resulted in participation by approximately 1.5 million children and teens for 2010. The State Library coordination consists of: 1) dedicated state library staff to coordinate and lead Summer Reading at New York Libraries; 2) membership in the Collaborative Summer Library Program (CSLP), a 49-state collaborative which creates an annual reading program theme and slogans, program manual, educational program materials using theme-based art work created by nationally recognized illustrators, an audio and a television public service announcement, and a forum for problem-solving and discussion around public library summer reading activities; 3) statewide educational activities for parents, children, educators, decision makers and the library community to encourage both participation and support; 4) customization of national materials to fit the needs of New Yorkers with a branded name and logo: “Summer Reading at New York Libraries;” and 5) an on-line registration tool for summer reading, available to all public libraries through Summer Reading at New York Libraries.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library (NYSL) provides summer reading program educational materials to all public libraries and public library systems. These materials include: a manual of summer reading resources created by CSLP as part of New York’s membership, New York State Library-created fact sheets and flyers translated into multiple languages, and New York State-themed recreational reading lists for children and families. In addition, the State Library exhibits and promotes the program to parents, caregivers and educators through year-round events so that the maximum number of children and teens can participate and benefit. Beginning in 2009, a promotional firm has been working with the New York State Library and the coordinator of “Summer Reading at New York Libraries,” to promote summer reading to diverse groups throughout New York State. A clear unified message on the importance and fun of summer reading in New York State has been achieved by use of a “Summer Reading at New York Libraries” logo. This also enables NYS customization of national materials to fit the needs of New Yorkers. To encourage interest in the program, a statewide launch was held in 2010 at the Langston Hughes Library in Queens, New York, that introduced Secret Agent 23 Skidoo, the spokesperson for “Summer Reading at New York Libraries”, who performed “Make Wave,” the summer reading theme song, along with other family-friendly “kid hop” numbers. The New York State Library prepared a Research Brief and an annotated bibliography on The Importance of Summer Reading: Public Library Summer Reading Programs and Learning. The Research Brief is available on the New York State Library’s Summer Reading web page: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/summer/research.htm. Educators and Librarians throughout New York State, and the country, were made aware of this summer reading research summary through postings on various websites, such as American Library Association; dissemination of information through national and New York State Library listservs; and presentations at educational conferences and meetings in New York State. Partnerships at the State level enabled New York’s public television stations to air CSLP-created public service announcements, and reach early childhood educators with information about the appropriate public library summer offerings. Beginning in 2009, NYSL promoted collaboration between school library media centers and their local public library in support of summer reading by providing all school library media specialists with an electronic version of a specially created School Library Partner Manual. 2009 and 2010 also marked the beginning of collaboration with the NYS legislature. In 2009, the Assembly’s Summer Reading Challenge began supporting local public library summer reading programs. Beginning in 2010, the Senate began similar support and included “Summer Reading at New York Libraries” materials along with their reading materials for children. We continue to work with the legislature, public broadcasting, and schools to provide the same message of the value of summer reading to children and families throughout New York State. To assist local public libraries in reaching underserved families in rural areas and to utilize the latest technology to attract teens and other groups, in 2010 the New York State Library began offering an on-line registration tool for summer reading programs to public libraries statewide. This web-based product enables children to participate from any location and keep track of their reading, write reviews, and learn about public library resources all summer long.
Project Outputs:
In the period October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2010, “Summer Reading at New York Libraries” program was offered throughout the state through New York’s 1,100 library outlets. All 23 Public Library Systems participated, helping member libraries share best practices. During this period, 22 of the 23 Public Library Systems held a total of 190 professional development workshops to train 2,989 library professionals in carrying out the summer reading program in their libraries; a total of four presentations were made to New York State educational groups on the importance of summer reading reaching 205 attendees; and a total of four site visits were conducted which had a total of 155 attendees. In 2010, the first of a four-year series of summer reading promotional workshops was held with an audience of 45 librarians. Also in 2010, training workshops were held on managing the new on-line summer reading registration software product. 165 librarians attended one of eleven live training sessions held throughout New York State. An additional 138 librarians participated in one of four training webinars. For the first year of this offering, 271 of 756 public libraries (35.8%) used this on-line registration tool as part of their summer reading program. Beginning in 2009 an on-line and downloadable School Library Partner Manual was created to help school libraries collaborate with local public library summer reading programs. In 2010, the School Library manual was downloading and/or viewed from the New York State library website a total of 102,926 times. “Summer Reading at New York Libraries” web presence was continued, updated and expanded—three web sites were used during this period: 1) www.summerreadingnys.org, summer reading related literacy games and activities for children and families, links to local public libraries, library staff planning ideas, and promotional materials. Due to technological difficulties, this site was only available from July 2010 to September 2010. During that three-month period there were 13, 505 page views. 2) http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/summer/index.html, a coordinated location for online summer reading resources, research related to the academic value of summer reading, current information, manuals, reading lists, and flyers produced in eleven languages. There were 323,975 page views. 3) http://performersandprograms.com/index.html, originally created through an LSTA grant; this database assists library staff and educators to locate local performers for summer reading educational program events and educational activities. There were 1,329,866 page views for this site over the two summer seasons.
Project Outcomes:
A research brief and annotated bibliography, The Importance of Summer Reading: Public library Summer Reading Programs and Learning, available on the State Library’s web site (http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/summer/research.htm) indicates that children and students who read during the summer months perform better academically when school resumes in the fall. Public and School Librarians throughout the country and New York State use this document to educate parents, educators, and decision makers on the importance of public library summer reading programs. The youth services librarian from Queens, New York, explained that this is very valuable in working with parents to encourage their children to participate in the library’s program. One library reported using this document with their local school librarian to reach the school’s PTO and Board of Trustees. During the 2010 summer reading season, more libraries were able to reach the underserved and improve access for all children and teens. Libraries in the capital region of New York State developed new strategies to include the underserved in their libraries’ programs. A post-project survey showed that 100% of respondents reported employing at least one new strategy to expand services to underserved users. The regional coordinator commented on this effort: “So much of effectively serving people with disabilities is awareness of their needs. I have seen our libraries’ awareness grow significantly this summer. I would recommend this grant project to any other library system as one that makes a real difference in their libraries’ day-to-day service!” Public library use of the on-line registration is reaching children and teens in more remote areas and enabling collaboration between public libraries and schools to benefit their common population. In several areas, children have printed out book reviews written throughout the summer and presented them during their classes in the fall.
Other Results:
Over 97% of public libraries statewide and 100% of public library systems participated; participation in summer reading programs at New York libraries has grown a phenomenal 440% since 2000, a time when libraries are being forced to cut personnel and hours, and face reduced or stagnant funding. This high level of participation shows the priority placed on summer reading and use of public libraries by families and communities throughout New York State.
Anecdotal Info:
The New York State Library received favorable comments from across the state, as well as feedback on very creative projects undertaken by libraries statewide. Using the 2010 theme of “water,” one library was visited by a maritime museum scientist and a diverse group of families learned about the water cycle and the importance of the Hudson River to us all. Another public library created an entire summer reading program in both Spanish and English and had bilingual staff available to accommodate both languages in order to give the library’s growing Spanish-speaking population a chance to enjoy summer reading and books. New York State summer reading data collection and evaluation show the following overall trends: 1) Value in program promotion through collaborations with community organizations and local businesses and use of their resources; and 2) Statewide promotion and assistance through the State Library and the public library systems helps each library develop a high quality program customized for their community.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-36886
Project Title: Project Number:
Targeting Library Services to Meet Changing Needs for Literacy, Education and Outreach
Library Name: Project Director:
New York State Library Cassandra Artale
Phone Number: Email:
518-474-1479 cartale@mail.nysed.gov
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$99,011 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$ $99,011
Number of Persons Served:
911,104
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services to persons having difficulty using libraries 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Non/limited English speaking persons  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Outreach Services  
Start Date: End Date:
10/1/2008 9/30/2010
Statewide?green check mark Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The New York State Library provided state-level leadership, planning, coordination, consultation, and support services to enable library systems and libraries to target and reach out to individuals of diverse backgrounds and those who have difficulty using libraries and library services.
Project Activities/Methods:
The New York State Library staff worked with library systems and libraries to help them identify and serve diverse populations and persons of all ages who are not traditional library users. Activities included, but were not limited to: 1. Partnering with public library systems and public libraries and other community organizations to reach out to and provide library services to special target groups including: Native Americans, persons incarcerated in state and county correctional facilities, persons with physical and learning disabilities, the elderly, persons speaking languages other than English, the unemployed and underemployed, adults who are illiterate, persons living in geographically isolated areas, and others that have difficulty using the library. 2. Support services and grant programs to libraries and systems to help them offer model community-based programs for adults and families who need literacy services; 3. Partner with: a) the New York State Department of Labor, b) public broadcast stations in NY, c) other state libraries through Project Compass, to provide libraries and library systems with the resources needed to: help job seekers, offer workforce readiness resources, and help library users with entrepreneurial/business development within New York State.
Project Outputs:
The New York State Library staff developed a model job information web site for libraries to share new job information resources statewide. The web site went online in January 2009 and had 7,225 hits between October 1, 2009 and September 30, 2010. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/outreach/careers.htm The New York State Library partnered with the Project Compass, a project created by the North Carolina State Library and WebJunction and funded by a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The project’s goal is expansion and improvement of State Library workforce development services for public libraries during the current economic crisis. The State Library shared information gained through Project Compass with libraries statewide, expanded contacts with agencies that assist job seekers, and developed public computing centers which focus on assisting job seekers in 30 public libraries and 5 mobile sites throughout New York. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/outreach/careers.htm#compass The New York State Library partnered with public television stations WMHT and WCNY for “Help Wanted: Tools for Tough Times,” a grant-funded series of television programs that address the current economic crisis and its effects on New York families and individuals. “Help Wanted” focuses on the stories, needs, issues, and solutions for specific job seekers. It also explores resources for workforce development including re-training for a new career, consumer protection and family finances. The series airs statewide on New York’s nine public television stations. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/outreach/helpwntd.htm and http://helpwantedinteractive.org/ The New York State Library: a) produced a web page specifically for Help Wanted and provided links and technical assistance to “Help Wanted” web master; b) collaborated on the development of program themes: Employment Resources, Job Training, Consumer Protection, Family Finances; and c) publicized and promoted “Help Wanted” throughout the state. In response to the needs of New York’s job seekers and the needs of public libraries which are directly serving them, the New York State Library worked with the NYS Department of Labor (DOL) to produce a joint webinar on successful partnerships between public libraries and One Stop employment centers across the state. Held on February 4, 2010, through the DOL’s WebEx software hosting system, the webinar was successful in reaching and involving staff from 28 of New York’s 71 One Stop Employment Centers. An estimated 41 public library and public library system staff participated. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/outreach/careers.htm#guides New York State Library staff assisted public libraries and systems with special grant projects for library services to Native Americans, people incarcerated in state and county correctional facilities, persons with physical and learning disabilities, the elderly, persons speaking languages other than English, adults who need literacy services, and persons living in geographically isolated areas. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/outreach/links.htm and http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/outreach/index.html#Basics During 2009, State Library staff continued to work with ten New York State (state-funded) Family Literacy Library Services grant recipients (public libraries and public library systems) to plan and implement model family literacy projects. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/familylit/07awards.htm During 2010, the State Library began work with ten NYS Family Literacy grant recipients which involve 253 libraries and branches with a total service population of over 8 million New Yorkers. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/familylit/09awards.htm
Project Outcomes:
Other Results:
During 2009 State Library staff continued to work with twelve New York State (state-funded) Adult Literacy Library Services grant recipients (public libraries and public library systems) to implement adult literacy projects in local communities across the State. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/literacy/07litawd.htm . During 2010 the State Library began work with eleven new NYS Adult Literacy Library Services grant recipients which involve 276 libraries and branches with a total service population of over 8 million New Yorkers. See: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/literacy/09litawd.htm In addition, an online application system for both NYS Adult and Family Literacy grants was developed in 2008 and implemented in 2009. The application period for 2011-13 NYS Adult and Family Literacy Library Services grants is now underway through the streamlined process the online application system makes possible.
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34520
Project Title: Project Number:
Technology Training Project 0070-10-0003
Library Name: Project Director:
Four County Library System Pamela Brown
Phone Number: Email:
607-723-8236 pbrown@4cls.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$15,678 $23,043
Number of Persons Served:
124
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Library technology, connectivity, and services 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Provide access to information, resources and ideas
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Library staff and volunteers  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Information Access and Services  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This project created a videoconferencing training solution for the needs of member libraries for point-to-point communication to alleviate the need for travel.
Project Activities/Methods:
The library system purchased and installed a Polycom multi-user phone solution for meetings and webcams for each of its member libraries. Libraries received assistance and training on the use of Skype as a point-to-point videoconferencing solution for web conferences and interactive communication with personnel at other locations. A directory of user/library addresses was published at http://intranet.4cls.org.
Project Outputs:
A total of 124 conference calls were conducted using the VOIP phone equipment and 31 libraries within the system utilized the Skype interface and webcams to conduct meetings or conferences over the web during the project activity period.
Project Outcomes:
Utilizing technology to overcome travel and budget barriers to conduct system-wide training has helped the library system members expand the use of their telecommunications equipment and has helped them with the acceptance of technology as an viable business communication strategy.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-35347
Project Title: Project Number:
Upper Hudson Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini Grant 0070-09-1015
Library Name: Project Director:
Upper Hudson Library System Mary Fellows
Phone Number: Email:
518-437-9880 mary@uhls.lib.ny.us
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$14,160 $26,160
Number of Persons Served:
30,021
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary?green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
Building interest and enjoyment of reading as a leisure activity over the summer remained a paramount goal throughout the summer reading program. This objective was reinforced by recognition of the value of summer reading in helping students maintain their reading skills as a preparation for the fall school term.
Project Activities/Methods:
In addition to building recognition of summer reading programs, the Upper Hudson Library System devised a four-part challenge to help libraries build monetary and community support of their of summer reading programs. Successful libraries were offered a stipend based on their success in reaching defined levels of achievement for each of four activities. The stipend was commensurate with goals set forth for participation in the Library Partnership Challenge component of the program. Each library was challenged to reach out to their community in new ways to involve individuals, businesses, organizations, and local media in promoting and participating in summer reading program activities. An assessment of library participation was based on a rubric for achievement. The success of the program was evaluated by a survey of participants. Professional development activities for staff were conducted to help libraries kick off their summer reading programs and use the collaborative resources provided by the New York State Library. In addition to town and individual library website postings, many libraries used the school vote opportunity to display summer reading posters, banners and reading resource lists for families and children as take-aways. Large screen displays in library and school lobbies helped acquaint students and parents with the games and interactive activities mounted on the site.
Project Outputs:
A total of 5,331 children and 731 teens registered for the Upper Hudson Library System summer reading program. Children reported reading 29,778 books, and teens reported reading 3,135 books. Attendance at all 1,095 programs totaled 30,021. Public library staff conducted 28 school visits in addition to publishing many newspaper and media announcements. The Public Service Announcement was aired two times, and radio stations provided at least three slots for summer reading promotion; 27 announcements were published in area newspapers. 208 different print materials were created; and 51,393 copies of these materials were distributed.
Project Outcomes:
Increasing outreach to community partners was a primary goal for this project. As measured by a survey, 100% of participating libraries reported developing two new partnerships in this year’s summer reading program. Additionally, 100% of library staff participating in this project reported gaining new skills in building advocacy and support for summer reading.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
One library reported: "Not only did the Challenge offer good ideas, but it motivated me to do more than in previous years. It was fun challenging myself." Another librarian said: " A really positive aspect of the Challenge is that having it on your mind while planning is very motivating. It encourages going into more creative thought and action."
Exemplary Reason:
This project encouraged and rewarded libraries to develop new community partnerships, which will help those libraries sustain services in these challenging economic times.

Project Code: 2009-NY-35348
Project Title: Project Number:
Westchester Library System LSTA 2009 Summer Reading Mini Grant 0070-09-1018
Library Name: Project Director:
Westchester Library System Susan Sterling
Phone Number: Email:
914-231-3235 tkirchner@wlsmail.org
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$12,000 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$26,000 $38,000
Number of Persons Served:
45,534
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 2. Access to Library Resources for Lifetime Improvement
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen families and children
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Children, Young adults and teens  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Education-Related Services for Children and Teens Summer reading programs
Start Date: End Date:
1/1/2009 9/30/2009
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary? OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
The Westchester Library System’s 38 member libraries were able to use summer reading resources and funding to offer special programs. During the two months of summer reading activities, 29 libraries received small stipends to offer additional reading events, celebrations, special performace events, or festivals. The library system also provided two training workshops for library staff geared to assist libraries in using the themes "Be Creative" or "Express Yourself."
Project Activities/Methods:
Summer reading programs at Westchester libraries included intergenerational programs, reading marathons, the issuance of reading passports, and the completion of reading journals. Kickoff festivities at area libraries used funding to invite educational performers and artists to celebrate the creative theme. Individual libraries developed additional activities surrounding the creativity theme such as "Cerealism" in which children learned how to create pop art cereal boxes. Several libraries utilized the Spanish language resources promoting reading and library membership to special populations. Promotion was a key element and was viewed as the reason underscoring a significant increase in participation at many Westchester libraries.
Project Outputs:
A total of 21,000 children and 743 teens registered for the summer reading program and reported reading 550,000 children’s and 2,312 young adult books; 2,811 programs were conducted throughout the system’s 38 libraries, with a total attendance of 45,534 participants. Public library staff helped disseminate resources through 38 school visits and provided articles and inserts for many news outlets. A guide called: "Books to Share 2009" was developed by the Westchester Library System for distribution throughout the system, in addition to the 2009 Historical Fiction, 2009 Future Fiction & Fantasy and Westchester’s Choice Fiction 2009. More than 10,000 copies of these resources were distributed through libraries and schools. Additionally, the library system created a news insert with support from a local sponsor, called "Read Your ’Art’ Out", which was well-integrated with the arts and performance themes.
Project Outcomes:
Participating libraries reported substantial growth in the attendance at summer library programs as gauged by attendance, with several libraries reporting gains of 50-100% over the previous year.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
South Salem Public Library held its 4th annual summer reading program for teens. Attendance reflected a 40% increase in participation and an increase of nearly 100% in books read by the teen population as compared to the prior year. Portchester Public Library was able to increase their Spanish book circulation by 18% over the summer and attracted 1,332 children to their reading program. Ardsley Public LIbrary worked with a well-known illustrator who read to children and helped children to create their own art projects, incorporating stories into cereal art box projects.
Exemplary Reason:

Project Code: 2009-NY-34532
Project Title: Project Number:
Wii Programming for Older Adults 0070-10-0012
Library Name: Project Director:
Mohawk Valley Library System Sue Rokos
Phone Number: Email:
518-355-2010 srokos@mvls.info
Library Building:
LSTA Funds Expended: Cash Match:
$7,365 $
In Kind Contributions: Total Cost:
$21,745 $29,110
Number of Persons Served:
1,080
LSTA Purpose: State Goal:
Services for lifelong learning 3. New York Libraries Meet Changing Needs for Services
IMLS Primary Performance Category: IMLS Secondary Performance Category:
Enhance a lifetime of learning opportunities Strengthen communities
Primary Users: Secondary Users:
Rural populations, Seniors  
Primary Services: Secondary Services:
Outreach Services, Virtual Library Services  
Start Date: End Date:
4/1/2009 3/31/2010
Statewide? Partnership?
Exemplary?green check mark OBE-Related?
Project Purpose:
This initiative used technology for library programming and interactive gaming in libraries and outreach sites with special populations. Wii equipment, games, cameras and accessories were introduced at 56 library sites.
Project Activities/Methods:
Seven libraries or branch library buildings received training assistance for Wii programming. Thirty library staff were trained to support this type of programming. In addition to working with senior groups within the libraries, library staff made new contacts at ten outreach sites. A workshop on intergenerational gaming programs and using teens as volunteer assistants helped sustain the gaming program at many community outlets. Through the grant, many local materials: publicity flyers, lesson plans, blogs, videos, photographs, and surveys were developed to help promote the Wii programming schedule. Online networking outlets, including the Mohawk Valley Wii webpage: http://www.mvls.infor/Wii/index.html) were effective advertising for the library’s gaming program.
Project Outputs:
The grant program reached 59% of the target population and exceeded the goals for community outreach, conducting a total of 41 library programs and 15 outreach programs. Seniors surveyed through the program responded very favorably to the Wiii library programming: 83% of those surveyed indicated they would continue to participate in future social opportunities using the gaming software.
Project Outcomes:
Building bridges between libraries, communities and constituents, this program demonstrated how new library services can successfully embrace mutiple outreach populations.
Other Results:
Anecdotal Info:
Exemplary Reason:
Library staff were trained to use new technologies to accomplish outreach goals to engage a special population to use libraries.
Last Updated: March 23, 2011