Appendices to Creating the Future: a 2020 Vision Plan for Library Service in New York State

  1. “2020 Vision” Development: Background
  2. Regents Advisory Council on Libraries: Background
  3. “2020 Vision” Surveys and Input
  4. The Future of Libraries: A Selected List of Resources
  5. Regents Statewide Policy for Libraries, 2000-2010: Background
  6. Structure and Functions of the New York State Library and New York State Education Department Organization Chart
  7. New York’s Library Systems
  8. Informational Brief: Impact of School Libraries on Student Achievement (Executive Summary)
  9. Remarks to the Board of Regents, April 2012: Gerald Nichols; John Hammond

Appendix A – “2020 Vision” Development: Background

In April 2010, the New York State Board of Regents challenged the library community and the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to develop and recommend to the Board a new “2020 Vision” for library services in order to ensure the greatest access to information for all New Yorkers.  Existing Regents statewide policy for libraries, contained in the document Meeting the Needs of All New Yorkers: Library Service in the New Century, Final Report of the Regents Commission on Library Services was now a decade old.  While much had been accomplished, the library, technology and economic landscape had changed drastically from 2000 to 2010.  Due in part to the severe economic downturn caused by the Great Recession of 2007, library use was increasing dramatically while State funding for libraries was decreasing.  All types of libraries – academic, public, school and special – were facing new and different demands for services and programs from New Yorkers.  It was time for a new vision and statewide policy plan.

 The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries, then under the leadership of Council Chair Bridget Quinn-Carey (2010-2011) welcomed this challenge from the Board of Regents.  The Council sponsored an open meeting at the NYLA Conference in November 2010 to gather new ideas and feedback on the perceived need for a new vision for library services.  The Council then voted unanimously at their December 2010 meeting to establish a 2020 Vision Planning Taskforce under the leadership of John Hammond.   The Planning Taskforce worked with the library and education communities for more than a year to develop a new vision and innovative statewide plan for library services.  There were multiple statewide calls for both ideas and feedback from the library and education communities, from the general public and from other stakeholders such as government officials, business leaders and community groups.  The Planning Taskforce made extensive use of technology to gather ideas and comments.  To ensure inclusiveness, transparency and accountability, the plan development process was publicly communicated via emails to stakeholders, listserv postings, blogs and websites.  Comments from stakeholder groups and individuals were made publicly available on the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries website

NYLA 2011; phto shows John Hammond, Regent Tilles, Gerald Nichols, Deputy Comm. Cannell. Click to see a larger version.The 2011 New York Library Association annual conference offered an opportunity for the library community to share their feedback on an initial draft.  On November 4, an open meeting was held in Saratoga Springs. Regent Roger Tilles, chair of the Regents Committee on Cultural Education, Jeffrey W. Cannell, Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education, Council chair person Gerald Nichols and Council 2020 Vision Planning Taskforce chair John Hammond listened to comments about the first draft.  Over 100 people attended this open meeting, and others provided written comments. These comments, along with those received electronically, assisted the Planning Taskforce in developing a second draft.

After receiving statewide input on the second draft of the new vision and plan, the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries voted unanimously in March 2012 to adopt the final version for presentation to the New York State Board of Regents.  Creating the Future, a 2020 Vision and Plan for Library Services in New York State: Recommendations of the New York State Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to the New York State Board of Regents includes 60 recommendations that are designed to improve library services for all New Yorkers.

On April 24, 2012, this exciting new vision and plan for library services was accepted by the Board of Regents. The Board of Regents also directed Deputy Commissioner Jeffrey Cannell and State Librarian Bernard A. Margolis to work with the Council and others to develop an implementation strategy and detailed action plan. The plan will identify which of the recommendations will be implemented through Regents action, which may require changes to legislation and which may require some other type of action by the State Library, the library community and/or other key stakeholders.

Major Highlights and Timeline

  • November 2010 – Open Meeting with Council Chair Bridget Quinn-Carey, ALA President Roberta Stevens, NYLA President Kathleen Miller and Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education Jeffrey W. Cannell during 2010 NYLA Conference, Saratoga Springs
  • December 2010 – Summary highlights presented to the Board of Regents; Regents Advisory Council on Libraries appoints 2020 Vision Planning Taskforce
  • March 2011 – First statewide call for input from library and education communities
  • April 2011 –  Summary highlights presented to the Board of Regents
  • June 2011 – Second statewide call for input from library and education communities
  • August 2011 – Statewide opinion survey for the general public, conducted online via local library, library system and State Library websites
  • September 2011 –  Regents Advisory Council on Libraries approves first draft of 2020 vision
  • October 2011 – Call to the library and education communities for comments on first draft of 2020 vision
  • November 2011 –  Open Meeting with Council Chair Gerald Nichols, Regent Roger Tilles, Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education Jeffrey W. Cannell and Planning Taskforce Chair John Hammond during 2011 NYLA Conference, Saratoga Springs
  • December 2011 - Regents Advisory Council on Libraries approves second draft of 2020 vision
  • January 2012 – Call to library and education communities, general public and other stakeholder groups for comments on second draft of 2020 vision and statewide plan
  • March 2012 – Regents Advisory Council on Libraries approves final 2020 vision document and submits to the State Education Department and to the Board of Regents.
  • April 2012 – 2020 Vision document accepted by the Board of Regents.

Appendix B – Regents Advisory Council on Libraries: Background

The Board of Regents, on June 3, 1894, voted to establish the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries "to serve as a library council with whom the University officers may consult whenever the advice or cooperation of experts may be desirable." 
The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries advises the Regents regarding library policy, works with the officers of the State Education Department in developing comprehensive statewide library and information policy and makes recommendations to the Regents concerning the implementation of the program.

There are twelve (12) members of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries.  Members are appointed by the Board of Regents upon recommendation of the Commissioner of Education. Membership is for a five (5) year term. If a member is appointed to fill an unexpired term, he or she is eligible for an additional full five (5) year term. Reappointment may be made after a lapse of one (1) year. Terms of members begin October 1.

The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries meets a minimum of four times a year, typically in January, April, September and December either through face-to-face meetings or conference calls.  The Council meets face-to-face with the Board of Regents at least once a year to discuss library policy issues, typically during the April or May Regents meetings.  The 2007 through 2011 annual reports of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to the Board of Regents are located on the RAC website

Major Goals of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries

In 2008, the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries adopted the following three major goals for their work:

  1. Monitor and Advise. The Regents Advisory Council will monitor and advise on State Education Department and Office of Cultural Education policies, staffing, long-range plans, legislative proposals, regulations affecting libraries, and library implications of other Education Department and Regents Programs. The Regents Advisory Council will also monitor and advise on Federal policy and long-range plans regarding libraries.
  2. Strengthen. The Regents Advisory Council will work to strengthen the programs and services of the New York State Research Library, the Division of Library Development, and other programs and services of the State Education Department that affect libraries.
  3. Communicate. The Regents Advisory Council will ensure that effective communication takes place with the Regents and the Commissioner of Education regarding library matters. The Regents Advisory Council will also ensure that effective communication takes place between the Regents and the library community. The Regents Advisory Council will seek to build an effective consensus on all policies and programs affecting all types of libraries. The Regents Advisory Council will act as an advocate for libraries, library staff, and library trustees.

More information about the Council and its work.

The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries and the “2020 Vision”

Between April 2010 and April 2012, the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries met as a whole twelve times in order to advance development of the “2020 Vision.”  The Council also met with the Board of Regents three times between April 2010 and April 2012 to discuss preliminary findings and provide progress updates.  As described in more detail in Appendix A, the Council held two open meetings, one in November 2010 and one in November 2011 to gather input and feedback from the library community.

The Council created a 2020 Vision Planning Task Force at their December 7, 2010, meeting and appointed John Hammond as Chairperson.  The group was charged to work with the library and education communities in developing the new “2020 Vision.”   The Planning Taskforce met by conference call fourteen times between January 2011 and March 2012. Taskforce members made extensive use of email and also established a Google group to carry out their work. The Taskforce completed its charge in March 2012.

Over the course of the two years, all members of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries were involved in advancing the new “2020 Vision.”  The Council members and State Education Department staff who served on or supported the work of the 2020 Vision Planning Taskforce have an asterisk next to their name.

Members of the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries, 2010 – 2012:

Chairs: Bridget Quinn-Carey, 2010-2011; Gerald Nichols, 2011-2012

Vice-Chairs: Gerald Nichols, 2010-2011; John Hammond, 2011-2012

Current Members: *John Hammond (2016), Executive Director, Northern New York Library Network; Jill Hurst-Wahl (2012), Director, Library and Information Science Program, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University; *Norman J. Jacknis (2015), President, Metropolitan Library Council Board of Trustees; *Sara Kelly Johns (2015), Instructor, Mansfield University School Library and Information Technology Program; Timothy V. Johnson (2012), Librarian for Africana Studies, Anthropology & Food Science, New York University Libraries; Steven M. Manning (2016), Director, Regional Information Center/Computer Services Center, Greater Southern Tier BOCES Regional Information Center; *John P. Monahan (2013), Director, Putnam-Northern Westchester BOCES, Recently retired; *Mary Muller (2014), President, Board of Trustees, Troy Public Library; *Gerald Nichols (2012), Director, Palmer Institute for Public Library Organization and Management, Long Island University, C.W. Post Campus; Sharon E. Orienter (2014), President, Board of Trustees, Rochester Public Library; *Bridget Quinn-Carey (2013),
Chief Operating Officer, Queens Library; Louise S. Sherby (2014), Professor, Hunter College Libraries.

Previous Members: Barbara Hamlin (2011), Trustee, Wood Library, Canandaigua; Dionne Mack-Harvin (2011), Executive Director, Brooklyn Public Library; Samuel L. Simon (2010), Trustee, Ramapo Catskill Library System.

State Education Department: *John Brock, Associate in School Library Services; *Jeffrey W. Cannell, Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education and Acting State Librarian; *Carol Ann Desch, Coordinator of Statewide Library Services and Director of Library Development; Loretta Ebert, Director, New York State Research Library; *Maribeth Krupczak, Library Development Specialist; *Paula Paolucci, Administrative Assistant to the State Librarian; *Ashleigh Whitfield, Graduate Assistant


Appendix C – “2020 Vision” Surveys and Input

The 2020 Vision Planning Taskforce initiated their work by seeking feedback from the library and education communities about their visions for the future of libraries and library services.  The ten questions asked to these groups were:

  1. What are the two most important roles of libraries today?  What will they be in the future?  How will libraries fulfill these future roles?
  2. What are the greatest challenges libraries will face over the next 10 years?  What assets and resources do libraries have that can overcome these challenges?  What are the barriers that will prevent libraries from meeting these challenges?
  3. How can library service be extended to those currently not using libraries?  How do we engage community members in connecting their needs to libraries?
  4. What will be the most important roles of school libraries in the future?  What will increase the visibility and relevance of school libraries?
  5. How can academic libraries be more integral to their own institution’s community? Is there a role for academic libraries beyond the campus?  If so, what is that role?
  6. What can public libraries do to ensure their survival?  How can they better serve their communities?
  7. What will be the most important roles of special and research libraries in the future?  What will increase the visibility and relevance of special and research libraries?
  8. What are the greatest challenges facing New York State’s library systems over the next 10 years?  What are the assets and resources library systems will need to meet these challenges?
  9. How can the State Library and the State Education Department help libraries position themselves to successfully meet the needs of all New Yorkers for library services in 2020 and beyond?
  10. What will be the impact on libraries with the rapid growth of commercial information sources like streaming video, iTunes, and e-books?  How can libraries prosper in a Digital Age?

Some 95 responses were received, 36 of which were from statewide library and education leadership organizations.  Many respondents indicated a growing need for libraries to keep up with technology in order to best serve their local communities, as well as a need to update their physical spaces to encourage New Yorkers to view them as community centers.  Several major areas of need were identified:

  • Ensuring equity of access to information in all formats;
  • Preserving digital materials
  • Partnerships between public, school, academic and special libraries should be created and strengthened;
  • Reliance on the New York State Library and the State Education Department to act as government liaisons and library advocates;
  • Combating uninformed perceptions about the importance of libraries
  • The need for certified school librarians in all school libraries, including elementary schools;
  • Increased marketing and community outreach programs;
  • The need for changes and updates in library regulations and legislation; and
  • The need to educate non-users about library services, bringing more people to the library.

Responses to these questions and other comments have been posted on the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries website.

The second round of this initial call for input invited all New Yorkers to participate in the development of the plan through a short survey.  Libraries in New York State were asked to post a downloadable widget to their websites, which would lead the general public to a survey created using SurveyMonkey.com.  Questions included:

  1. What services should New Yorkers expect from their libraries in the Digital Age?
  2. How can libraries better engage community members in connecting their needs to libraries?
  3. How can library services be extended to those not currently using libraries?
  4. What will be the impact on libraries of the rapid growth of commercial information sources like streaming video, iTunes, and e-books?
  5. Please provide us with any other thoughts or ideas you have on improving library services in New York State
  6. What type(s) of libraries do you use? (check all that apply)
    • Public
    • School
    • College
    • Special (hospital, museum, government, business, etc.)
    • Other (please specify)
  7. How often do you visit a library?
    • At least once a week
    • At least once a month
    • At least once a year
    • Infrequently
    • Never
    • Other (please specify)
  8. Your contact information (optional):
    • Name
    • Zip
    • Email Address
  9. Your Library's Name

Some 600 New Yorkers responded to the survey.  A significant number of respondents indicated that they use their public libraries (Table A, Chart A), and many stated that they visit their library at least once a week (Table B, Chart B).

Table A: What type(s) of libraries do you use? (check all that apply)

Answer Options

Response Percent

Response Count

Public

98.8%

556

School

22.7%

128

College

27.4%

154

Special*

15.1%

85

Other

 

15

answered question

563

skipped question

33

chart depicts what types of libraries used; data as in Table A above

Table B: How often do you visit a library?

Answer Options

Response Percent

Response Count

At least once a week

71.07%

398

At least once a month

23.39%

131

At least once a year

2.50%

14

Infrequently

2.50%

14

Never

0.54%

3

Other (please specify)

 

5

 answered question

560

skipped question

71

chart depicts how often libraries are visited; data as in Table B above

            New Yorkers agree that libraries should focus on the needs of their local communities, potentially using surveys to discover what the people want. Survey respondents value and use traditional services, yet also look toward a future of non-traditional offerings, such as book kiosks, art exhibits, 3D printers, rentable I-Pads and Kindles, and library cards with the ability to download music and e-books.  Based on the comments received, users expect libraries to:

  • Provide the services of qualified librarians
  • Provide up-to-date technology
  • Offer technology and computer training
  • Provide services to young adults and children
  • Offer diverse and creative programming to all New Yorkers
  • Market themselves online and through traditional media formats
  • Offer job search assistance
  • Be open for a greater number of convenient hours
  • Serve as community centers
  • Partner with community organizations
  • Continue to provide print materials

The Taskforce reviewed all of the comments and recommendations presented by the library community, education organizations and the general public when developing the first draft of the plan. The first draft was released to the library community in October, 2011. The second draft was widely disseminated for comment in January, 2012 to education and library organizations, individuals who had previously responded, and additional statewide, nonprofit business and media organizations and the general public. 

List of Organizations and Groups Providing Input:

  • BOCES Regional Information Centers
  • Curtis L. Kendrick, University Dean for Libraries and Information Resources, on behalf of The City University of New York
  • ConnectNY
  • Friends of the New York State Library
  • Library Trustees Association of New York State
  • Literacy Nassau
  • Literacy New York
  • Long Island University, Palmer School
  • Medical Library Association, Upstate New York and Ontario Chapter
  • The Member Library Directors of Nassau County, Executive Board
  • New York Alliance of Library Systems
  • New York Library Association:
    • Academic and Special Libraries Section
    • Public Libraries Section
    • Rural Libraries Roundtable
    • Section of School Librarians
    • Youth Services Section
  • New York State Archives
  • New York State Big 11 Comprehensive Research Libraries Conservation Program Offices
  • New York State Conference of Mayors
  • New York State Council of Educational Associations
  • New York State Higher Education Initiative
  • New York State Historical Records Advisory Board
  • NYS Public Library System Outreach Coordinators
  • New York State Reading Association
  • New York State Science Education Leadership Association
  • New York State Reference and Research Resources Councils
  • NOVELNY Steering Committee
  • Public Library System Directors Organization
  • Public Library System Youth Services Consultants and Managers
  • School Library Systems Association of New York State
  • SUNY Council of Library Directors
  • State University of New York Librarians Association
  • Syracuse University, School of Information Studies (seven members)
  • Suffolk Library Administrators' Seminar
  • University at Buffalo Department of Library and Information Studies, Graduate School of Education
  • Utica College

Libraries:

  • Clifton Park-Halfmoon Public Library, Board of Trustees
  • The Community Library, Cobleskill
  • Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County
  • Rochester Public Library
  • Wells Memorial Library, Marie-Anne Azar Ward, Board President

Library Systems:

  • Cayuga-Onondaga BOCES SLS
  • Finger Lakes Library System
  • Jefferson-Lewis BOCES School Library System
  • Mid-Hudson Library System
  • Mid-York Library System
  • Mohawk Valley Library System
  • Nassau Library System
  • North Country Library System
  • North Country School Library System (SLS) Directors
  • Rochester Regional Library Council
  • Southern Adirondack Library System

Appendix D – The Future of Libraries: A Selected List of Resources


Appendix E – Regents Statewide Policy for Libraries, 2000-2010: Background

  In 2011, the New York State Library presented a written status report on the implementation of Meeting the Needs of All New Yorkers: Library Services in the New Century, Final Report of the Regents Commission on Library Servicesexternal link opens in a new window (2000) to the Board of Regents and to the library community. This detailed status report, entitled A Final Review: Implementation of the Recommendations of the Regents Commission on Library Services, 2000 to 2010external link opens in a new window, documents progress on each of the ten recommendations for improving library services. It also describes the many ways in which the libraries, library systems and other library and education organizations in New York State worked together and individually to advance statewide goals for improvement of library services, highlights progress made and identifies several remaining challenges.  The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries used the contents of A Final Review to help inform development of the new recommendations in Creating the Future, a 2020 Vision and Plan for Library Services in New York State: Recommendations of the New York State Regents Advisory Council on Libraries to the New York State Board of Regents.

For more detailed information on implementation activities and highlights of progress on each recommendation, view the full status reportexternal link opens in a new window.

Appendix F – Structure and Functions of the New York State Library

The mission of the New York State Education Department — “To raise the knowledge, skill, and opportunity of all the people in New York” — provides direction for libraries, archives, and museums, as well as the formal educational structure of schools and colleges.

The Office of Cultural Education, which includes the New York State Library, operates under the following principles: a focus on the public as primary audience; a focus on statewide impact and value; including an educational component accessible to a variety of learning levels in all activities; stewardship of collections, including research and availability for use; and digital technology as a component of all activities.

The mission of the New York State Library, through the Division of Library Development and the Research Library, is “to provide leadership and guidance for the planning and coordinated development of library services and to serve as a reference and research library for the people of the State.”

The New York State Library provides information and library services to New Yorkers through the Division of Library Development and its Research Library.

The Division of Library Development works in partnership with the state’s 73 library systems to bring cost-effective, high-quality library services to New Yorkers via the state’s 7,000 school, public, academic, and special libraries. Staff experts work with librarians, trustees, school administrators, public officials, and local leaders to solve problems and find new ways of making library services and resources available to their community. Library Development administers more than $100 million in state and federal funding for New York’s libraries and helps New York’s libraries take full advantage of federal and private funding programs like the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA), NTIA Broadband Technology Opportunity Program grants, E-rate telecommunications discounts, and Gates Library Foundation grants.

The Research Library is the principal library for the people and government of New York State and serves the research needs of individuals, schools and universities, and the business and scientific communities. With over 20 million items and a strong focus on the culture and history of New York State, the Library circulates books to individuals onsite and through interlibrary loan to public, academic, school and special libraries statewide. One of the 125 largest research libraries in North America, the Research Library is the only state library to qualify for membership in the Association of Research Libraries.

Visitors to the library access the comprehensive local history and genealogy collection, law library, federal and state document collection, and use free internet and wireless service. All New York residents 18 years and older may apply for a Resident Borrower’s Card.

The Library provides all New Yorkers with access from their local library, home, school, or office to the New York Online Virtual Electronic Library (NOVELNY), a rich online resource of information, reference materials, full text magazines and newspaper articles, and scholarly publications. NOVELNY can be accessed with a local library card or a valid New York State driver license/non-driver ID.

The Talking Book and Braille Library is a regional library for the National Library Service and is part of the Research Library. TBBL serves some 30,000 disabled adults and children in 55 upstate counties.

The New York State Library is situated in the Office of Cultural Education in the New York State Education Department.  The Library is located in the Cultural Education Center on Madison Avenue in Albany, New York.

Organization Chart, New York State Education Department, 2012

NYSED organizational chart 2012; click to view and download a PDF version


Appendix G – New York’s Library Systems

The New York State Library works in partnership with the three types of library systems to carry out planning and coordination for the development of library services throughout the state.

New York’s 7000 libraries are served by an interlocking network of 73 library systems, consisting of 23 public library systems, 41 school library systems, and nine Reference and Research Library Resources Systems and Councils (also called Councils) (3Rs). These systems were created by the Regents, the Executive and the State Legislature to provide services designed to address the needs of their member libraries and to provide economies of scale in making shared services available to libraries that could otherwise not afford them. Systems also equalize the quality of library services throughout the state.

Public Library Systems: Public library systems were created in the late 1950s to serve public libraries. They provide a range of direct support services to public libraries that enable them and their branches to serve their communities better. All but one of the 755 public libraries and 314 branch libraries (1069 outlets) are members of one of the state’s 23 public library systems. The 26 central and co-central libraries of the public library systems provide extended public service hours and reference and information service to residents throughout the service areas of the systems.

Public library systems vary in their structure and governance. Of the 23 public library systems, 16 are cooperative systems—associations created by agreement of the boards of the members, which are chartered libraries that retain their autonomy. Four systems are federated systems created by the board or boards of supervisors of the counties involved. Three are consolidated systems chartered as a single entity under a board of trustees; all public libraries in a consolidated system's service area are branches of that library system. Examples of services offered by public library systems include—

  • Operation of computer networks for managing circulation and access to online catalogs of resources, reference requests, interlibrary loan, electronic databases, e-books and access to the Internet
  • A program of free direct access to resources and services of all system member libraries
  • Support for the latest technologies and telecommunication services including the New York Online Virtual Electronic Library (NOVELNY), Internet and full-text electronic journals, newspapers and e-books
  • Support for a central library that provides extended public hours and a strong research and reference collection
  • Interlibrary loan, daily delivery and other resource sharing services
  • Programs that assist local communities without libraries to obtain library services
  • Creating and maintaining web sites for the system and member libraries
  • Outreach and literacy services for individuals and groups in need of services such as job and educational information, adaptations for people who are disabled, aged, incarcerated or residing in institutions
  • Access to books and library materials in large print and non-print formats; assistance with registration and service from the NYS Talking Book & Braille Library (Upstate) and the New York Public Library's Andrew Heiskell Braille & Talking Book Library (New York City and Long Island)
  • Staff expertise in areas such as library law, library budgeting and management, technology, collection development, youth services and outreach
  • Professional development and training for library staff and trustees
  • Annual statewide summer reading programs in coordination with the New York State Library
  • Cooperative grants administration and grant writing assistance
  • Marketing, public relations and printing services
  • Centralized purchasing, ordering and processing of library materials
  • Connect with the New York State Library, school library systems, reference and research library resources councils, and school, academic and special libraries for access to specialized resources

Reference and Research Library Resources Systems and Councils (also called Councils) (3Rs): The state's nine councils were chartered in 1966 to improve reference and research library resources throughout the state and to provide a means for the development of interlibrary cooperative plans and services such as regional catalogs and region-wide resource sharing. They have two main purposes: to provide direct services to academic, health-care, business, and other special libraries and to the state's other library systems; and to provide a connection among all libraries in the state. As of 2011, the state had 271 degree-granting institutions of higher education, including 83 public, 147 independent, and 40 proprietary. The Councils provide a wide range of support services to their member libraries, including the following:

  • Support for the latest technologies and their application, including digitization projects, social networks, e-books, Internet access, lists, websites, locator tools, equipment and software
  • Interlibrary loan, document delivery services, reciprocal borrowing cards and other resource sharing services
  • Special library research services for hospital libraries to ensure access to major research collections
  • Staff expertise in areas such as medical information, advanced technology, collection development, management, reference services, digitization, and information literacy
  • Programs of professional development and training for library staff and trustees on site, online and through video conferencing
  • Coordination of state funding programs for academic collections, hospital services, regional resource sharing and documentary heritage
  • Working with the New York State Library to develop the New York Online Virtual Electronic Library (NOVELNY)
  • Cooperative grants administration, consulting and grant writing assistance
  • Marketing, advocacy and public relations services
  • Web sites for the council and member libraries

School Library Systems: School library systems were created in 1984 to serve school libraries. They provide support services designed to improve the quality of service in the state's elementary and secondary school libraries. These systems afford all member libraries the resources and opportunities that most single school libraries could not afford on their own. School library systems are governed by the boards of trustees of the Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) or by the major urban boards of education. Forty-one school library systems serve 4,437 school library media centers in 713 public school districts and 485 nonpublic schools statewide. School library systems provide a wide range of support services, including:

  • Promote information literacy for students and support implementation of the Common Core Standards
  • Use the latest technology to make print and electronic resources accessible to students and the education community through connections to all libraries in New York State
  • Establish special collections of materials through Cooperative Collection Development projects and provide electronic resources through cooperative purchases
  • Provide for professional development and specialized training opportunities on the latest advancements in technologies for the education community, clerical and administrative staff and school librarians
  • Provide access to information and library resources locally, regionally, statewide and beyond
  • Provide access to the latest advances in library and education technology

Appendix H – Informational Brief: Impact of School Libraries on Student Achievement (Executive Summary)

The New York Comprehensive Center (NYCC)/RMC Research Corporation, in consultation with the New York State Education Department, the New York State Library and the New York Library Association, has produced a new publication entitled, Informational Brief: Impact of School Libraries on Student AchievementPDF file external link opens in a new window.  This comprehensive brief provides a current and rigorous research analyses which demonstrates the positive impact that school libraries and school librarians have in advancing student learning.  

By referencing numerous studies conducted throughout the United States, the brief illustrates the importance of school libraries in the lives of all students, particularly when it comes to literacy, college and career readiness, assessment and graduation rates.  The brief is framed around the New York State Board of Regents Reform Agenda.

The New York Comprehensive Center (NYCC) is one of 16 regional comprehensive centers funded by the U.S. Department of Education.  NYCC works with the New York State Education Department to support education leaders and encourage student achievement.

More information about NYCCexternal link opens in a new window | The full NYCC publicationexternal link opens in a new window and the executive summary external link opens in a new window


Appendix I – Remarks to the Board of Regents, April 2012

Last Updated: November 21, 2012 -- asm