2020: What’s Your Vision for Library Services in New York State?

On Thursday, November 4, 2010, the “2020: What’s Your Vision for Library Services in New York State?” program was held at the New York Library Association Conference in Saratoga. The program was cosponsored by the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries, the Library Trustees Association of New York State, the New York Library Association and the New York State Library.

This discussion was the first step toward developing a new statewide plan for improving library services for all New Yorkers.  The last statewide plan for library services was adopted by the Board of Regents as statewide policy for libraries in 2000.

Session attendees had the opportunity to hear from the following library leaders:

  • Bridget Quinn-Carey, Chair, Regents Advisory Council on Libraries
  • Roberta Stevens, President, American Library Association
  • Kathy Miller, President, New York Library Association
  • Jeffrey W. Cannell, Deputy Commissioner for the Office of Cultural Education

Attendees then had the opportunity to share their thoughts, ideas, and concerns about library services in the future in small group discussions based on the following questions:

  • What services will New Yorkers expect from their academic, public, school, and special libraries in 2020?
  • What strategies will best position library organizations to deliver those services?
  • What role should the State play in serving libraries and New Yorkers more effectively?

Results of the group table discussions

[Note: there were no tables 2 or 3. Click on thumbnail images to see original flip chart notes.]

Table 1

(see text) | (see text)

Question 1: What services will New Yorkers expect from their academic, public, school, and special libraries in 2020?

  • Instant gratification 
  • Better networking connectivity 
  • Better amenities (seating, cafés)
  • 24/7 access to resources and services
  • Access from home 
  • Connections to resources and support for parents to give their children the best start 
  • Seamless relations among libraries (patrons don’t care where they get it) and other cultural institutions 
  • Libraries actively engaged in creating of community based content 
  • More computer/software for library use 
  • Customer service 
  • Survival skills 
  • The same information delivered multiple ways 
  • Everything at fingertips 
  • Overall access 
  • Library should be part of everyday life 
  • More robust relationships between government and libraries in access to services online 
  • Frequent reinvention 
(see text) | (see text)

Question 2: What strategies will best position library organizations to deliver those services? 

  • New different funding public private partnerships 
  • Look forward—the past is the past 
  • Be constantly in touch with users, especially to track trends and needs 
  • Stop being passive!  Reposition libraries as the providers of information 
  • Recruitment of innovators and digital natives to library staffs 
  • Invest in staff training 
  • Development of fundraising skills by positioning libraries as a key institution in economic, social, and education success of the community 
  • Teach and empower staff to be advocates
  • Work closely with government at all levels 
  • Stop saying “no” or “we can’t”
  • Embrace risk, tolerate failure, cultivate resilience 
  • Reassess traditional services and be willing to let go the past to make room 
  • Have a sacred cow barbeque
(see text) | (see text)

Question 3: What role should the State play in serving libraries and New Yorkers more effectively?

  • Embrace creative leadership 
  • Seek out economies of scale 
  • Foster library innovation and cooperation 
  • Strengthen library systems 
  • Encourage school/public initiatives.  Better still, mandate more collaboration between/among libraries 
  • Reduce paperwork 
  • Allow framed photos of libraries in the halls of government 
  • Be more in touch with communities 
  • Money 
  • Maintain its own workforce 
  • Have key government officials talk about importance of libraries 
  • Recodify library law to reduce inconsistencies and simplify 

Table 4 

(see text) | (see text)

Question 1: What services will New Yorkers expect from their academic, public, school, and special libraries in 2020?

  • Instant access to information 
  • Mobile access 
  • 24/7 facility access 
  • More and deeper tech training 
  • More services to seniors 
  • Staff understanding and acceptance of popular culture 
  • Universal access 
  • Instructional focus for librarians 
  • Easy and seamless discovery (what you want when you want it)
  • Different model for preschool services and caretakers 
  • Don’t teach me how to find it, find it for me 
  • Netflix model—convenience 
  • Library as place; coffee 
  • Docking stations, downloads, gaming 
  • Bandwidth 

 

(see text)

Question 2: What strategies will best position library organizations to deliver those services? 

  • Understand your audience and communication 
  • Collaboration between difference kinds of libraries and library systems 
  • Compete with Google (we’re non‐partisan as librarians)
  • Watch MTV/be culturally aware 
  • Community connections—forge relationships with nonlibrary groups

 

(see text) | (see text)

Question 3: What role should the State play in serving libraries and New Yorkers more effectively?

  • Give us the money and stay out of our way 
  • Infrastructure/standards for electronic demands places on us by patrons 
  • Increased leadership from State Library and coordinating role 
  • Seed money to encourage collaboration 
  • Create funding models that work—throw out municipal model—make them recharter to voter-directed funding 
  • State Library work more effectively with other State agencies 
  • Make annual report data easier to retrieve and more compelling 
  • More granular information door count, circulation, etc… (look at data we’re currently collecting)

Table 5

(see text) | (see text)

Question 1: What services will New Yorkers expect from their academic, public, school, and special libraries in 2020?

  • Current 
  • Free 
  • Coordination within libraries and types of systems 
  • Online 
  • Recreational—all formats 
  • A physical place and a virtual places 
  • Organization of information 
  • Access—equity  
  • Information literacy—pre-K through adults 
  • Places and information and places of teaching—resource access 
  • Supply help to all—nonjudgmental, personalized service 

 

(see text) | (see text) (see text) | (see text)

Question 2: What strategies will best position library organizations to deliver those services? 

  • Merge libraries—information sharing 
  • More collaboration 
  • Fewer physical facilities—cost of maintaining 
  • Promote library systems more strongly 
  • Improve physical access of buildings 
  • Sense of community—personalization of the experience 
  • Library as community center seen as necessary
  • Better public relations, marketing 
  • Take a look at delivery of public relations—use new outlets 
  • Just do it, involve now 
  • Outreach is important 
  • Systems are hard pressed—totally dependent on New York State funding 
  • Three layers of systems in New York State 
  • Systems a hidden layer behind libraries 
  • Little libraries cannot afford to run a modern library without the systems 
  • Interconnectedness, collaboration, advocate for each other 
  • Go where your patrons are to advocate 
  • School libraries need a more defined message 
  • School libraries aren’t 10 months a year any more—open all summer as the electronic side is available 24/7

 

(see text) | (see text) (see text) | (see text)

Question 3: What role should the State play in serving libraries and New Yorkers more effectively?

  • Job of trustees—advocacy and promotion 
  • Libraries should be considered an essential service just like roads 
  • Frustration with the State—discussing merging library systems, multitype: public, 3Rs, academic 
  • Not much help from the State to help with mergers 
  • Go to the voters, forget our legislators 
  • Why not ask for increased funding?—look at all that we are delivering 
  • Provide service to all the prisons 
  • Leadership on information literacy from the State and State Ed.—need a scope and sequence, fluency curriculum 
  • Curriculum model on fluency curriculum as part of Race to the Top 
  • Asking us to do more with less 
  • Availability of staff at State Library to share and collaborate with rest 
  • Does State government know/understand what libraries do?
  • NYLA’s role with advocacy 
  • Funding at a 15 year low 
  • What is the library message?
  • We need a single spokesperson 
  • Public service announcements 
  • Man on the street Q and A 
  • Five points—need from State Ed.
    • Standards and curriculum 
    • Funding 
    • Professional development 
    • Data and assessment 
    • Advocacy  

Table 6

(see text)

Question 1: What services will New Yorkers expect from their academic, public, school, and special libraries in 2020?

  • More of developing technology 
  • Point of need service 
  • Community hubs 
  • Educational/continuing educational services 
  • Maintain role of “Town Center”
  • Multi-use (i.e. café, exhibition space, classrooms, meeting spaces)
  • Fundraising 
  • Co-create participatory librarianship 
  • Outreach (immigrant communities)
  • Librarians into community—education and training 
  • Student services 
  • Ease of use and access

 

(see text)

Question 2: What strategies will best position library organizations to deliver those services? 

  • Space 
  • Budget planning process in place 
  • Flexible staff—new roles 
  • Community ties/partnerships/collaboration 
  • Planning on a higher level—community changes and assessing if library can meet them 
  • Growth technology plan 
  • Forward-looking trustees 
  • Collective purchasing, service bundling 
  • System wide/centralized services and providers (shared services)

 

(see text)

Question 3: What role should the State play in serving libraries and New Yorkers more effectively?

  • State policies/certifications of trustees 
  • Leveraging purchasing power (catalogues, databases, delivery)
  • Commitment to maintain stable funding, stabilized funding 

Table 7

(see text) | (see text)

Question 1: What services will New Yorkers expect from their academic, public, school, and special libraries in 2020?

  • Keeping up with technology changes 
  • Fast, convenient delivery of services 
  • More participation in the gathering of information 
  • E-textbooks 
  • Technology use by/for community groups 
  • Public libraries—create young readers 
  • Place to learn, to read and write 
  • Digital services and downloads 
  • Content creation centers 
  • Training in technology for staff—well trained staff

 

(see text) | (see text)

Question 2: What strategies will best position library organizations to deliver those services? 

  • Staff with diverse skills, age range, and background 
  • Provide facilities that can deliver needed services including website 
  • Libraries/systems test new ideas 
  • Libraries/systems as leaders in technology and content creation 
  • Interactive communication with the community (listening and engaging)
  • Actively recruiting young people into librarianship 
  • Marketing, advocacy, telling our story 
  • Help libraries and systems remain financially viable 
  • Engage digital natives 
  • Review and update libraries/systems minimum standards and regulations 
  • Strategies for improving out visibility 
  • Flexible and adaptive librarians 
  • We should pursue collaborations and partnerships

 

(see text) | (see text)

Question 3: What role should the State play in serving libraries and New Yorkers more effectively?

  • Provide funding for libraries/systems 
  • Aggregate best practices Statewide 
  • Educate the public on the importance of libraries/systems and how they work together 
  • Partner with systems to help member libraries serve patrons 
  • Remove barriers to innovation 
  • State should be more cutting edge 
  • Provide adequate funding and resources for regional needs 
  • Mandated trustee training 
  • Participation in cooperative purchasing 
  • Increased presence/clout in K-12 
  • Reward innovation at regional/local level 

Table 8

(see text)

Question 1: What services will New Yorkers expect from their academic, public, school, and special libraries in 2020?

  • Mobile technologies 
  • Helping the unserved 
  • Community issues—affordability and accessibility 
  • 24/7 access 
  • Cutting edge technology/services 
  • Access/cooperation among types 
  • Authenticating info 
  • Place for community dialogue

 

(see text)

Question 2: What strategies will best position library organizations to deliver those services? 

  • Strong library systems to deliver their services 
  • Strong recruitment—training and career opportunities 
  • Better systems of communications to audiences 
  • Better in touch with end user needs 
  • Community anchor—patron and student driven 
  • Flexible—ready for change, flexible job roles, continued education, multiple sets 
  • Selling ourselves—unbiased approach

 

(see text)

Question 3: What role should the State play in serving libraries and New Yorkers more effectively?

  • Reinvent itself 
  • Little role as possible!
  • Flexibility in regulations 
  • Equity in State aid 
  • Predictable funding—stability in timing 
  • More advice/tech assistance 
  • Strong and robust State Library Association 

If you would like to contribute to this statewide discussion, please download and fill out the worksheet [pdf icon 42k] and send it to either the address listed on the second page or email it to NYSLRegComments@mail.nysed.gov.  Any questions about this program or the discussion toward developing a new statewide plan can be sent to this email address as well.

Last Updated: November 23, 2010 -- asm